FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   PreferencesPreferences   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Forum index » Medicine forums » General talk
crossmatching blood before transfusion
Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 1 of 1 [9 Posts] View previous topic :: View next topic
Author Message
Guest






PostPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2005 4:57 pm    Post subject: crossmatching blood before transfusion Reply with quote

My brother had several transfusions because he was losing quite a lot of blood
from his colon. I think. I have been getting reports from various family
members but not his doctor who will only talk to one family member.

It is my understanding that blood is routinely crossmatched before a transfusion
and now apparently my brother is having a reaction to the blood he received and
will need to undergo dialysis because "his kidneys have failed" because of
incompatibility of the blood transfused.

How could this have happened if the blood is crossmatched. What is the
procedure for crossmatching blood?

Ora
Back to top
Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 28 Apr 2005
Posts: 1218

PostPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2005 11:39 pm    Post subject: Re: crossmatching blood before transfusion Reply with quote

Quote:
How could this have happened if the blood is crossmatched. What is the
procedure for crossmatching blood?


Blood is crossmatched unless there's a dire emergency and it's needed
in a great hurry. (In which case they give O-neg and hope for the best)

In a crossmatch they mix the plasma of the donor's blood with the red
cells of the recipient's blood, and vice versa. This alerts them to the
presence of antibodies that cause acute transfusion reactions (they
cause cells to agglutinate), but even crossmatching doesn't prevent
late transfusion reactions which are caused by antibodies in smaller
amounts, and antibodies that develop later as the body makes them.
However, it's EXTREMELY rare for one of these late reactions to be so
severe as to cause renal failure (since they happen slowly, by
definition). Reactions so bad they cause renal failure happn fast, and
most of them are due to human error in giving the wrong blood. Either
that, or his kidneys are failing for some other reason.

Anyway, your story is a strange one.

SBH
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Thu Jul 14, 2005 1:15 am    Post subject: Re: crossmatching blood before transfusion Reply with quote

On 13 Jul 2005 18:39:37 -0700, "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com"
<sbharris@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

Quote:
How could this have happened if the blood is crossmatched. What is the
procedure for crossmatching blood?

Blood is crossmatched unless there's a dire emergency and it's needed
in a great hurry. (In which case they give O-neg and hope for the best)

In a crossmatch they mix the plasma of the donor's blood with the red
cells of the recipient's blood, and vice versa. This alerts them to the
presence of antibodies that cause acute transfusion reactions (they
cause cells to agglutinate), but even crossmatching doesn't prevent
late transfusion reactions which are caused by antibodies in smaller
amounts, and antibodies that develop later as the body makes them.
However, it's EXTREMELY rare for one of these late reactions to be so
severe as to cause renal failure (since they happen slowly, by
definition). Reactions so bad they cause renal failure happn fast, and
most of them are due to human error in giving the wrong blood. Either
that, or his kidneys are failing for some other reason.

Anyway, your story is a strange one.

SBH

Thanks very much, Steve. It seemed strange to me too but it was all based on
"hearsay evidence" since ICU personnel like to have one family contact and
stories get confused in the re-telling. I still don't really know what is
happening over there. Can't talk to the doctor, the nurse wants to talk to only
one family member who is a bit of an airhead. He finally consented to talk to
two family members, both daughters of my brother. My brother has five siblings
who are all very interested in his recovery and none of them can talk to anyone
besides his two daughters who are not inclined to pass along accurate
information.

But he is feeling much better now so I guess the dialysis was an appropriate
move. His daughters still don't know where the blood was coming from and no one
else will tell anyone anything. Sad situation.

Ora
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2005 9:42 pm    Post subject: Re: crossmatching blood before transfusion Reply with quote

On 13 Jul 2005 18:39:37 -0700, "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com"
<sbharris@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

Quote:
How could this have happened if the blood is crossmatched. What is the
procedure for crossmatching blood?

Blood is crossmatched unless there's a dire emergency and it's needed
in a great hurry. (In which case they give O-neg and hope for the best)

In a crossmatch they mix the plasma of the donor's blood with the red
cells of the recipient's blood, and vice versa. This alerts them to the
presence of antibodies that cause acute transfusion reactions (they
cause cells to agglutinate), but even crossmatching doesn't prevent
late transfusion reactions which are caused by antibodies in smaller
amounts, and antibodies that develop later as the body makes them.
However, it's EXTREMELY rare for one of these late reactions to be so
severe as to cause renal failure (since they happen slowly, by
definition). Reactions so bad they cause renal failure happn fast, and
most of them are due to human error in giving the wrong blood. Either
that, or his kidneys are failing for some other reason.

Anyway, your story is a strange one.

SBH

Now they are saying that the reaction might have been caused by sensitivity or
allergy to the dye used in the two different angiograms which they performed.

Ora
Back to top
Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 28 Apr 2005
Posts: 1218

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:28 pm    Post subject: Re: crossmatching blood before transfusion Reply with quote

nospam@aol.com wrote:
Quote:
On 13 Jul 2005 18:39:37 -0700, "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com"
sbharris@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

How could this have happened if the blood is crossmatched. What is the
procedure for crossmatching blood?

Blood is crossmatched unless there's a dire emergency and it's needed
in a great hurry. (In which case they give O-neg and hope for the best)

In a crossmatch they mix the plasma of the donor's blood with the red
cells of the recipient's blood, and vice versa. This alerts them to the
presence of antibodies that cause acute transfusion reactions (they
cause cells to agglutinate), but even crossmatching doesn't prevent
late transfusion reactions which are caused by antibodies in smaller
amounts, and antibodies that develop later as the body makes them.
However, it's EXTREMELY rare for one of these late reactions to be so
severe as to cause renal failure (since they happen slowly, by
definition). Reactions so bad they cause renal failure happn fast, and
most of them are due to human error in giving the wrong blood. Either
that, or his kidneys are failing for some other reason.

Anyway, your story is a strange one.

SBH

Now they are saying that the reaction might have been caused by sensitivity or
allergy to the dye used in the two different angiograms which they performed.

Ora

COMMENT:

That's a LOT more likely.

BTW, such things from dye are generally reversable. The kidneys
recover.

SBH
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2005 11:02 pm    Post subject: Re: crossmatching blood before transfusion Reply with quote

On 15 Jul 2005 17:28:04 -0700, "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com"
<sbharris@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

Quote:


nospam@aol.com wrote:
On 13 Jul 2005 18:39:37 -0700, "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com"
sbharris@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

How could this have happened if the blood is crossmatched. What is the
procedure for crossmatching blood?

Blood is crossmatched unless there's a dire emergency and it's needed
in a great hurry. (In which case they give O-neg and hope for the best)

In a crossmatch they mix the plasma of the donor's blood with the red
cells of the recipient's blood, and vice versa. This alerts them to the
presence of antibodies that cause acute transfusion reactions (they
cause cells to agglutinate), but even crossmatching doesn't prevent
late transfusion reactions which are caused by antibodies in smaller
amounts, and antibodies that develop later as the body makes them.
However, it's EXTREMELY rare for one of these late reactions to be so
severe as to cause renal failure (since they happen slowly, by
definition). Reactions so bad they cause renal failure happn fast, and
most of them are due to human error in giving the wrong blood. Either
that, or his kidneys are failing for some other reason.

Anyway, your story is a strange one.

SBH

Now they are saying that the reaction might have been caused by sensitivity or
allergy to the dye used in the two different angiograms which they performed.

Ora

COMMENT:

That's a LOT more likely.

BTW, such things from dye are generally reversable. The kidneys
recover.

SBH

He has had two dialysis treatments and will be having another one today. His
bleeding has stopped and we are all hoping and praying for his recovery. It has
been a rough few days since all this happened.

Thanks for your encouragement - it really helps.

Ora
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2005 7:02 pm    Post subject: Re: crossmatching blood before transfusion Reply with quote

On 13 Jul 2005 18:39:37 -0700, "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com"
<sbharris@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

Quote:
How could this have happened if the blood is crossmatched. What is the
procedure for crossmatching blood?

Blood is crossmatched unless there's a dire emergency and it's needed
in a great hurry. (In which case they give O-neg and hope for the best)

In a crossmatch they mix the plasma of the donor's blood with the red
cells of the recipient's blood, and vice versa. This alerts them to the
presence of antibodies that cause acute transfusion reactions (they
cause cells to agglutinate), but even crossmatching doesn't prevent
late transfusion reactions which are caused by antibodies in smaller
amounts, and antibodies that develop later as the body makes them.
However, it's EXTREMELY rare for one of these late reactions to be so
severe as to cause renal failure (since they happen slowly, by
definition). Reactions so bad they cause renal failure happn fast, and
most of them are due to human error in giving the wrong blood. Either
that, or his kidneys are failing for some other reason.

Anyway, your story is a strange one.

SBH

Now it turns out that he has the anti-wright antibody and he has been told that
he should wear a medic-alert bracelet in case he needs another transfusion in
the future. I can't find anything about the anti-wright antibody other than
that found on http://www.cbbsweb.org/enf/abscreen_aabb4mo.html which doesn't
tell me very much.

It occurred to me that the anti-wright antibody and/or anti-wright antigen might
be called something else. Can you help me.

Thanks.

Ora
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2005 6:02 pm    Post subject: Re: crossmatching blood before transfusion Reply with quote

On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 21:02:49 GMT, nospam@aol.com wrote:

Quote:
On 13 Jul 2005 18:39:37 -0700, "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com"
sbharris@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

How could this have happened if the blood is crossmatched. What is the
procedure for crossmatching blood?

Blood is crossmatched unless there's a dire emergency and it's needed
in a great hurry. (In which case they give O-neg and hope for the best)

In a crossmatch they mix the plasma of the donor's blood with the red
cells of the recipient's blood, and vice versa. This alerts them to the
presence of antibodies that cause acute transfusion reactions (they
cause cells to agglutinate), but even crossmatching doesn't prevent
late transfusion reactions which are caused by antibodies in smaller
amounts, and antibodies that develop later as the body makes them.
However, it's EXTREMELY rare for one of these late reactions to be so
severe as to cause renal failure (since they happen slowly, by
definition). Reactions so bad they cause renal failure happn fast, and
most of them are due to human error in giving the wrong blood. Either
that, or his kidneys are failing for some other reason.

Anyway, your story is a strange one.

SBH

Now it turns out that he has the anti-wright antibody and he has been told that
he should wear a medic-alert bracelet in case he needs another transfusion in
the future. I can't find anything about the anti-wright antibody other than
that found on http://www.cbbsweb.org/enf/abscreen_aabb4mo.html which doesn't
tell me very much.

It occurred to me that the anti-wright antibody and/or anti-wright antigen might
be called something else. Can you help me.

Thanks.

Ora


I found it. It is anti-WRA. From what I have found so far that is quite common
but the WRA antigen is quite rare.

Ora
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2005 11:48 pm    Post subject: Re: crossmatching blood before transfusion Reply with quote

In article <mgbqe1pmrdfq4cpjc73pgil9gmdoov54ki@4ax.com>,
<nospam@aol.com> wrote:
Quote:
On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 21:02:49 GMT, nospam@aol.com wrote:

On 13 Jul 2005 18:39:37 -0700, "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com"
sbharris@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

How could this have happened if the blood is crossmatched. What is the
procedure for crossmatching blood?

Blood is crossmatched unless there's a dire emergency and it's needed
in a great hurry. (In which case they give O-neg and hope for the best)

In a crossmatch they mix the plasma of the donor's blood with the red
cells of the recipient's blood, and vice versa. This alerts them to the
presence of antibodies that cause acute transfusion reactions (they
cause cells to agglutinate), but even crossmatching doesn't prevent
late transfusion reactions which are caused by antibodies in smaller
amounts, and antibodies that develop later as the body makes them.
However, it's EXTREMELY rare for one of these late reactions to be so
severe as to cause renal failure (since they happen slowly, by
definition). Reactions so bad they cause renal failure happn fast, and
most of them are due to human error in giving the wrong blood. Either
that, or his kidneys are failing for some other reason.

Anyway, your story is a strange one.

SBH

Now it turns out that he has the anti-wright antibody and he has been told that
he should wear a medic-alert bracelet in case he needs another transfusion in
the future. I can't find anything about the anti-wright antibody other than
that found on http://www.cbbsweb.org/enf/abscreen_aabb4mo.html which doesn't
tell me very much.

It occurred to me that the anti-wright antibody and/or anti-wright antigen might
be called something else. Can you help me.

Thanks.

Ora


I found it. It is anti-WRA. From what I have found so far that is quite common
but the WRA antigen is quite rare.

Ora

I looked "Wright Antigen" up in OMIM (at PubMed), and followed some of
the links.

The OMIM entry called Wright a "private" blood system. This term is
used for uncommon factors that are usually found in only a few
families. It estimated the incidence of Wright A antigen in Caucasian
populations at about 3 in 10,000.

However, I found a paper that described an incidence of 1 in 1000 in
blood donors, and 1 in 56 blood donors had anti-Wright *antibody*.
There was a higher incidence of antibody in people with a long list of
conditions, including those that might have required blood
transfusions. Post-partum women also had a higher incidence.

So either your relative has the Wright antigen and had the bad luck to
get a transfusion from somebody with the anti-Wright antibody, or vice
versa. There are dozens of these rare traits, so they can't type for
all of them. If we take the stats above, your relative ran into a 1 in
56,000 or perhaps much rarer event. Perhaps Wright/anti-Wright is one
of those slow reactions that doesn't show up in a crossmatch.

Now that he knows, wearing a med-alert bracelet will make sure they
test for Wright antigen or anti-Wright antibody in any blood they
propose to transfuse into him in the future. If he carries the Wright
antigen, it might be worthwhile for his close relatives to be tested,
and perhaps wear the med-alert bracelets too, since if the stats above
are good, they run a 1 in 56 chance of having a similar bad reaction if
they need a transfusion.

Caveat: I'm not a doctor and I didn't do a real literature search.
But I hope the above helps.
Back to top
Google

Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 1 of 1 [9 Posts] View previous topic :: View next topic
The time now is Tue Dec 18, 2018 8:09 pm | All times are GMT
Forum index » Medicine forums » General talk
Jump to:  

Similar Topics
Topic Author Forum Replies Last Post
No new posts Blood Pressure Targets jay1000 cardiology 4 Thu Jul 13, 2006 11:53 pm
No new posts Can predisposed/inhereted variations in blood flow possible? Kumar cardiology 0 Wed Jun 28, 2006 5:17 am
No new posts Can predisposed/inhereted variations in blood flow possible? Kumar cardiology 1 Wed Jun 28, 2006 5:14 am
No new posts SOLID STATE BLOOD GAS SENSOR Rohit nursing 3 Mon Jun 26, 2006 7:17 pm
No new posts Coronary artery disease (CAD) occurs when the arteries th... coronary cardiology 1 Sat Jun 24, 2006 11:28 pm

Copyright © 2004-2005 DeniX Solutions SRL
Other DeniX Solutions sites: email marketing campaigns , electronics forum, Science forum, Unix/Linux blog, Unix/Linux documentation, Unix/Linux forums


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
[ Time: 0.0181s ][ Queries: 16 (0.0023s) ][ GZIP on - Debug on ]