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Does this make any sense?
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ACP
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 10:35 pm    Post subject: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

I had Restor IOLs implanted in June of this year.

So far I'm quite happy with the results but I find something that is very
puzzling to me. When using my LCD PC monitor the optimum focus point with
the IOLs alone is about 9 inches. The following is what I find with drug
store readers:

+1.0 24 inches
+1.5 22 inches
+2.0 20 inches

What's going on?

My goal is to have optimum with the monitor about at about 36 inches from my
eyes.

Any suggestions?

Thanks
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Repeating Rifle
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 141

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 1:52 am    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

On 7/19/06 3:35 PM, in article
NrednaswY4cKLiPZnZ2dnUVZ_qqdnZ2d@giganews.com, "ACP" <noneone@nowhere.nohow>
wrote:

Quote:
I had Restor IOLs implanted in June of this year.

So far I'm quite happy with the results but I find something that is very
puzzling to me. When using my LCD PC monitor the optimum focus point with
the IOLs alone is about 9 inches. The following is what I find with drug
store readers:

+1.0 24 inches
+1.5 22 inches
+2.0 20 inches

What's going on?

My goal is to have optimum with the monitor about at about 36 inches from my
eyes.

Any suggestions?

Thanks


It makes no sense to me at all. Although I am not a health professional, an

IOL lens that gives best acuity at 9 inches smacks of malpractice. Moreover,
if that were really the case, you would need negative, not positive, lenses
to see clearly farther out.

Bill
-- Ferme le Bush
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acemanvx@yahoo.com
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 15 Nov 2005
Posts: 732

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 2:03 am    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

Salmon Egg wrote:
Quote:
On 7/19/06 3:35 PM, in article
NrednaswY4cKLiPZnZ2dnUVZ_qqdnZ2d@giganews.com, "ACP" <noneone@nowhere.nohow
wrote:

I had Restor IOLs implanted in June of this year.

So far I'm quite happy with the results but I find something that is very
puzzling to me. When using my LCD PC monitor the optimum focus point with
the IOLs alone is about 9 inches. The following is what I find with drug
store readers:

+1.0 24 inches
+1.5 22 inches
+2.0 20 inches

What's going on?

My goal is to have optimum with the monitor about at about 36 inches from my
eyes.

Any suggestions?

Thanks


It makes no sense to me at all. Although I am not a health professional, an
IOL lens that gives best acuity at 9 inches smacks of malpractice. Moreover,
if that were really the case, you would need negative, not positive, lenses
to see clearly farther out.

Bill
-- Ferme le Bush


Maybe he chose to stay myopic to avoid reading glasses. Him seeing
clear from only 9 inches means hes a -4.5 which means perhaps he got
over-undercorrected so instead of a target of -2 to -3 he ended up too
myopic. Its very difficult to calculate IOLs and things like that
happen all the time. I know a woman in person who got overcorrected and
needs progressives. Be glad you are myopic and not hyperopic!
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Repeating Rifle
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 141

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 4:56 am    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

On 7/19/06 7:03 PM, in article
1153361006.512323.164950@p79g2000cwp.googlegroups.com, "acemanvx@yahoo.com"
<acemanvx@yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
Maybe he chose to stay myopic to avoid reading glasses. Him seeing
clear from only 9 inches means hes a -4.5 which means perhaps he got
over-undercorrected so instead of a target of -2 to -3 he ended up too
myopic. Its very difficult to calculate IOLs and things like that
happen all the time. I know a woman in person who got overcorrected and
needs progressives. Be glad you are myopic and not hyperopic!

OK. Even if the target IOL was missed just by random error creeping in, how
does adding a positive drug store lens move the best acuity away rather than
closer?

Bill
-- Ferme le Bush
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acemanvx@yahoo.com
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 15 Nov 2005
Posts: 732

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 6:50 am    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

Salmon Egg wrote:
Quote:
On 7/19/06 7:03 PM, in article
1153361006.512323.164950@p79g2000cwp.googlegroups.com, "acemanvx@yahoo.com"
acemanvx@yahoo.com> wrote:

Maybe he chose to stay myopic to avoid reading glasses. Him seeing
clear from only 9 inches means hes a -4.5 which means perhaps he got
over-undercorrected so instead of a target of -2 to -3 he ended up too
myopic. Its very difficult to calculate IOLs and things like that
happen all the time. I know a woman in person who got overcorrected and
needs progressives. Be glad you are myopic and not hyperopic!

OK. Even if the target IOL was missed just by random error creeping in, how
does adding a positive drug store lens move the best acuity away rather than
closer?

Bill
-- Ferme le Bush



Maybe he got an IOL in only one eye? Maybe his IOL is multifocal? Maybe
he is confused?
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ACP
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 8:37 am    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

<acemanvx@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1153378211.669629.125400@75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

Salmon Egg wrote:
On 7/19/06 7:03 PM, in article
1153361006.512323.164950@p79g2000cwp.googlegroups.com,
"acemanvx@yahoo.com"
acemanvx@yahoo.com> wrote:

Maybe he chose to stay myopic to avoid reading glasses. Him seeing
clear from only 9 inches means hes a -4.5 which means perhaps he got
over-undercorrected so instead of a target of -2 to -3 he ended up too
myopic. Its very difficult to calculate IOLs and things like that
happen all the time. I know a woman in person who got overcorrected and
needs progressives. Be glad you are myopic and not hyperopic!

OK. Even if the target IOL was missed just by random error creeping in,
how
does adding a positive drug store lens move the best acuity away rather
than
closer?

Bill
-- Ferme le Bush



Maybe he got an IOL in only one eye? Maybe his IOL is multifocal? Maybe
he is confused?

"I had Restor (~MULTIFOCAL~) IOLs (~PLURAL~) implanted in June of this
year."

From your answer, you are the one confused.
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acemanvx@yahoo.com
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 15 Nov 2005
Posts: 732

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 10:46 am    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

ACP wrote:

Quote:
"I had Restor (~MULTIFOCAL~) IOLs (~PLURAL~) implanted in June of this
year."

From your answer, you are the one confused.


You did not explain in your first post what type of IOLs you got. Maybe
you just need to adjust to the multifocals? If you have to be 9 inches
away to see clearly, your looking thru the wrong potion of the IOL.
Practice makes perfect
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ACP
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 12:21 pm    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

<acemanvx@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1153392392.930701.296050@75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

ACP wrote:

"I had Restor (~MULTIFOCAL~) IOLs (~PLURAL~) implanted in June of this
year."

From your answer, you are the one confused.


You did not explain in your first post what type of IOLs you got.

Then you didn't read my first post.
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Mike Tyner
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 1299

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 1:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

<acemanvx@yahoo.com> wrote

Quote:
If you have to be 9 inches
away to see clearly, your looking
thru the wrong potion of the IOL.
Practice makes perfect

In your experience.

-MT
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Repeating Rifle
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 141

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 7:15 pm    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

On 7/20/06 1:37 AM, in article
Q82dnYSnieAV3SLZnZ2dnUVZ_qKdnZ2d@giganews.com, "ACP" <noneone@nowhere.nohow>
wrote:

Quote:
Maybe he got an IOL in only one eye? Maybe his IOL is multifocal? Maybe
he is confused?

"I had Restor (~MULTIFOCAL~) IOLs (~PLURAL~) implanted in June of this
year."

From your answer, you are the one confused.

Let me express my ignorance here. How does a multifocal IOL work? Would it
not just cause a blur?

Bill
-- Ferme le Bush
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ACP
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 9:45 pm    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

"Salmon Egg" <salmonegg@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:C0E52458.3384E%salmonegg@sbcglobal.net...
Quote:
On 7/20/06 1:37 AM, in article
Q82dnYSnieAV3SLZnZ2dnUVZ_qKdnZ2d@giganews.com, "ACP"
noneone@nowhere.nohow
wrote:

Maybe he got an IOL in only one eye? Maybe his IOL is multifocal? Maybe
he is confused?

"I had Restor (~MULTIFOCAL~) IOLs (~PLURAL~) implanted in June of this
year."

From your answer, you are the one confused.

Let me express my ignorance here. How does a multifocal IOL work? Would it
not just cause a blur?

Bill
-- Ferme le Bush

Check out the following URL:

http://tinyurl.com/mbux6
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Glenn - USAEyes.org
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 129

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 11:18 pm    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

Your problems with mid range vision with the ReSTOR intraocular lens
(IOL) is not exactly unusual. Some of your problem may relate to the
limitations of multifocal IOLs and some of the problems may relate to
pupil size. There are several important facts about multifocal IOLs
that when combined may explain what you are experiencing.

All multifocal IOLs use rings of different focal range (power)
throughout the IOL. Think of a bull's eye target with each ring
optimized to provide focus at a different distance. No matter what the
design or manufacturer, the transition from one power ring to another
will probably cause a slight blur which often represents as a soft
halo around objects or light sources or just poor vision quality. The
fewer transition rings, the lower the probability of halos or poor
vision quality.

There is only so much light energy that enters the eye. A monofocal
IOL takes 100% of that light energy and optimizes it for one focal
distance. A multifocal may optimize 33% of that light energy for near
distance, 33% for mid distance, and 33% for full distance. That means
that no matter what you are looking at, only 1/3rd of the light energy
is optimized to provide clear focus of the object. The other 2/3rds is
less than optimized. This is a gross simplification of multifocal IOL
technology, but you get the idea.

With a significant amount of the light energy not optimized, you have
out of focus images on top of focused images. This often presents as a
reduction in contrast sensitivity, blur, and/or halos.

The ReSTOR IOL is "apodized". That means that a large central ring of
the IOL is all one focus, rather than a larger number of rings being
of similar and smaller size throughout the IOL. The purpose of the
apodized IOL is to reduce the probability of halos by reducing the
number of transition rings.

One of the limitations of this apodized technique is that the majority
of the light energy is optimized for near vision and for distance
vision. The middle distance vision tends to be of poor focus because a
smaller percentage of the IOL is optimized for mid-distance. For most
people this would mean that a can of beans on the store shelf is a bit
out of focus until you pick it up and hold it close.

It would appear - and this is only an educated guess - that your
correction has put the weak spot of a ReSTOR IOL at the precise
distance you need for computer work...but that is not the end of the
story.

Because the IOL works with rings of different power, the optimized
focus is very pupil size dependent. Let's go back to that simplified
1/3rd example.

Let us assume that the center of the multifocal IOL is optimized for
near vision, a mid-periphery ring is optimized for mid vision, and the
outer ring is optimized for distance vision. In a bright lit
environment that causes the pupil size to become very small, only near
vision optimized light energy would reach the retina to be seen. If
the pupil were small enough, the rings that provide distance focus and
mid focus would not be used at all because the light that would pass
through that portion of the IOL would be blocked by the iris (colored
portion inside the eye). Again, this is a gross simplification of
multifocal IOL technology, and again you get the idea.

The ReSTOR does have rings with different optimized powers. They are
pupil size dependant. If I recall correctly, the very center of the
ReSTOR is optimized for near vision. When you stick your nose up to
the monitor your entire field of vision is flooded with light emitting
from the monitor. That will cause your pupils to constrict and provide
vision optimized primarily for near vision. This may explain why 9
inches from the monitor you have clear vision. Your pupils are small
AND your IOL is optimized for very near distance with small pupils.

Sit back your desired 36" and try to adjust the light environment at
your computer. Adjust the monitor's bright and contrast down. Adjust
the ambient light down. With a lower light environment your pupils
will enlarge somewhat. After 20-30 minutes, your vision quality may
improve - or may get worse. If vision seems to get worse, turn up the
ambient light and keep the screen dim. See how it is after another
20-30 minutes. If that does not do it, turn up everything and blast
the light at you. Within a few minutes your pupils will constrict, but
I expect that will provide only very near vision of good quality.

By adjusting the light of the computer monitor and the environment,
you can adjust the size of your pupils and thereby hopefully change
the amount of light energy being optimized through your multifocal IOL
for the distance that you need.

You absolutely want to discuss your difficulties with your surgeon and
you must be patient. It takes the brain some time to figure out how to
use multifocal IOLs to the greatest advantage.

If you think that the manufacturers must be crazy to create a
multifocal IOL, do not underestimate the power of the brain to ignore
problems and take advantage where it can. You have a total blind spot
in your field of vision and yet you never see it. Your brain has
learned how to "look around" that blind spot. Similarly, the brain
will learn how to filter out the poorly focused light energy use the
well focused light energy. At least, that is the theory.

Glenn Hagele
Executive Director
USAEyes.org
Patient Advocacy Surgeon Certification

"Consider and Choose With Confidence"

Email to glenn dot hagele at usaeyes dot org

http://www.USAEyes.org
http://www.ComplicatedEyes.org

I am not a doctor.
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acemanvx@yahoo.com
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 15 Nov 2005
Posts: 732

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 11:34 pm    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

Glenn - USAEyes.org wrote:
Quote:
Your problems with mid range vision with the ReSTOR intraocular lens
(IOL) is not exactly unusual. Some of your problem may relate to the
limitations of multifocal IOLs and some of the problems may relate to
pupil size. There are several important facts about multifocal IOLs
that when combined may explain what you are experiencing.

All multifocal IOLs use rings of different focal range (power)
throughout the IOL. Think of a bull's eye target with each ring
optimized to provide focus at a different distance. No matter what the
design or manufacturer, the transition from one power ring to another
will probably cause a slight blur which often represents as a soft
halo around objects or light sources or just poor vision quality. The
fewer transition rings, the lower the probability of halos or poor
vision quality.

There is only so much light energy that enters the eye. A monofocal
IOL takes 100% of that light energy and optimizes it for one focal
distance. A multifocal may optimize 33% of that light energy for near
distance, 33% for mid distance, and 33% for full distance. That means
that no matter what you are looking at, only 1/3rd of the light energy
is optimized to provide clear focus of the object. The other 2/3rds is
less than optimized. This is a gross simplification of multifocal IOL
technology, but you get the idea.

With a significant amount of the light energy not optimized, you have
out of focus images on top of focused images. This often presents as a
reduction in contrast sensitivity, blur, and/or halos.

The ReSTOR IOL is "apodized". That means that a large central ring of
the IOL is all one focus, rather than a larger number of rings being
of similar and smaller size throughout the IOL. The purpose of the
apodized IOL is to reduce the probability of halos by reducing the
number of transition rings.

One of the limitations of this apodized technique is that the majority
of the light energy is optimized for near vision and for distance
vision. The middle distance vision tends to be of poor focus because a
smaller percentage of the IOL is optimized for mid-distance. For most
people this would mean that a can of beans on the store shelf is a bit
out of focus until you pick it up and hold it close.

It would appear - and this is only an educated guess - that your
correction has put the weak spot of a ReSTOR IOL at the precise
distance you need for computer work...but that is not the end of the
story.

Because the IOL works with rings of different power, the optimized
focus is very pupil size dependent. Let's go back to that simplified
1/3rd example.

Let us assume that the center of the multifocal IOL is optimized for
near vision, a mid-periphery ring is optimized for mid vision, and the
outer ring is optimized for distance vision. In a bright lit
environment that causes the pupil size to become very small, only near
vision optimized light energy would reach the retina to be seen. If
the pupil were small enough, the rings that provide distance focus and
mid focus would not be used at all because the light that would pass
through that portion of the IOL would be blocked by the iris (colored
portion inside the eye). Again, this is a gross simplification of
multifocal IOL technology, and again you get the idea.

The ReSTOR does have rings with different optimized powers. They are
pupil size dependant. If I recall correctly, the very center of the
ReSTOR is optimized for near vision. When you stick your nose up to
the monitor your entire field of vision is flooded with light emitting
from the monitor. That will cause your pupils to constrict and provide
vision optimized primarily for near vision. This may explain why 9
inches from the monitor you have clear vision. Your pupils are small
AND your IOL is optimized for very near distance with small pupils.

Sit back your desired 36" and try to adjust the light environment at
your computer. Adjust the monitor's bright and contrast down. Adjust
the ambient light down. With a lower light environment your pupils
will enlarge somewhat. After 20-30 minutes, your vision quality may
improve - or may get worse. If vision seems to get worse, turn up the
ambient light and keep the screen dim. See how it is after another
20-30 minutes. If that does not do it, turn up everything and blast
the light at you. Within a few minutes your pupils will constrict, but
I expect that will provide only very near vision of good quality.

By adjusting the light of the computer monitor and the environment,
you can adjust the size of your pupils and thereby hopefully change
the amount of light energy being optimized through your multifocal IOL
for the distance that you need.

You absolutely want to discuss your difficulties with your surgeon and
you must be patient. It takes the brain some time to figure out how to
use multifocal IOLs to the greatest advantage.

If you think that the manufacturers must be crazy to create a
multifocal IOL, do not underestimate the power of the brain to ignore
problems and take advantage where it can. You have a total blind spot
in your field of vision and yet you never see it. Your brain has
learned how to "look around" that blind spot. Similarly, the brain
will learn how to filter out the poorly focused light energy use the
well focused light energy. At least, that is the theory.

Glenn Hagele
Executive Director
USAEyes.org
Patient Advocacy Surgeon Certification

"Consider and Choose With Confidence"

Email to glenn dot hagele at usaeyes dot org

http://www.USAEyes.org
http://www.ComplicatedEyes.org

I am not a doctor.



This is why most cateract surgeons suggest single focal IOLs only.
Multifocal works but hurts your visual quality and those picky with
vision wont be happy. Accomodating IOLs are a gimmic of sorts, they are
ineffecient and give worse visual quality than single focal IOLs.
Monovision IOLs work for some if they can get used to seeing blurry in
one eye at all times. In the far(hopefully) future when I get
cateracts, ill get single focal IOLs to set me for -1.5 so I see the
computer fine without glasses.
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ACP
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 11:56 pm    Post subject: Re: Does this make any sense? Reply with quote

"Glenn - USAEyes.org" <glenn.hageleSTOPSPAM@USAEyes.org> wrote in message
news:o930c2d21p8idh4bfll8qmmvoeh9p1ij6p@4ax.com...
Quote:
Your problems with mid range vision with the ReSTOR intraocular lens
(IOL) is not exactly unusual. Some of your problem may relate to the
limitations of multifocal IOLs and some of the problems may relate to
pupil size. There are several important facts about multifocal IOLs
that when combined may explain what you are experiencing.

All multifocal IOLs use rings of different focal range (power)
throughout the IOL. Think of a bull's eye target with each ring
optimized to provide focus at a different distance. No matter what the
design or manufacturer, the transition from one power ring to another
will probably cause a slight blur which often represents as a soft
halo around objects or light sources or just poor vision quality. The
fewer transition rings, the lower the probability of halos or poor
vision quality.

There is only so much light energy that enters the eye. A monofocal
IOL takes 100% of that light energy and optimizes it for one focal
distance. A multifocal may optimize 33% of that light energy for near
distance, 33% for mid distance, and 33% for full distance. That means
that no matter what you are looking at, only 1/3rd of the light energy
is optimized to provide clear focus of the object. The other 2/3rds is
less than optimized. This is a gross simplification of multifocal IOL
technology, but you get the idea.

With a significant amount of the light energy not optimized, you have
out of focus images on top of focused images. This often presents as a
reduction in contrast sensitivity, blur, and/or halos.

The ReSTOR IOL is "apodized". That means that a large central ring of
the IOL is all one focus, rather than a larger number of rings being
of similar and smaller size throughout the IOL. The purpose of the
apodized IOL is to reduce the probability of halos by reducing the
number of transition rings.

One of the limitations of this apodized technique is that the majority
of the light energy is optimized for near vision and for distance
vision. The middle distance vision tends to be of poor focus because a
smaller percentage of the IOL is optimized for mid-distance. For most
people this would mean that a can of beans on the store shelf is a bit
out of focus until you pick it up and hold it close.

It would appear - and this is only an educated guess - that your
correction has put the weak spot of a ReSTOR IOL at the precise
distance you need for computer work...but that is not the end of the
story.

Because the IOL works with rings of different power, the optimized
focus is very pupil size dependent. Let's go back to that simplified
1/3rd example.

Let us assume that the center of the multifocal IOL is optimized for
near vision, a mid-periphery ring is optimized for mid vision, and the
outer ring is optimized for distance vision. In a bright lit
environment that causes the pupil size to become very small, only near
vision optimized light energy would reach the retina to be seen. If
the pupil were small enough, the rings that provide distance focus and
mid focus would not be used at all because the light that would pass
through that portion of the IOL would be blocked by the iris (colored
portion inside the eye). Again, this is a gross simplification of
multifocal IOL technology, and again you get the idea.

The ReSTOR does have rings with different optimized powers. They are
pupil size dependant. If I recall correctly, the very center of the
ReSTOR is optimized for near vision. When you stick your nose up to
the monitor your entire field of vision is flooded with light emitting
from the monitor. That will cause your pupils to constrict and provide
vision optimized primarily for near vision. This may explain why 9
inches from the monitor you have clear vision. Your pupils are small
AND your IOL is optimized for very near distance with small pupils.

Sit back your desired 36" and try to adjust the light environment at
your computer. Adjust the monitor's bright and contrast down. Adjust
the ambient light down. With a lower light environment your pupils
will enlarge somewhat. After 20-30 minutes, your vision quality may
improve - or may get worse. If vision seems to get worse, turn up the
ambient light and keep the screen dim. See how it is after another
20-30 minutes. If that does not do it, turn up everything and blast
the light at you. Within a few minutes your pupils will constrict, but
I expect that will provide only very near vision of good quality.

By adjusting the light of the computer monitor and the environment,
you can adjust the size of your pupils and thereby hopefully change
the amount of light energy being optimized through your multifocal IOL
for the distance that you need.

You absolutely want to discuss your difficulties with your surgeon and
you must be patient. It takes the brain some time to figure out how to
use multifocal IOLs to the greatest advantage.

If you think that the manufacturers must be crazy to create a
multifocal IOL, do not underestimate the power of the brain to ignore
problems and take advantage where it can. You have a total blind spot
in your field of vision and yet you never see it. Your brain has
learned how to "look around" that blind spot. Similarly, the brain
will learn how to filter out the poorly focused light energy use the
well focused light energy. At least, that is the theory.

Glenn Hagele
Executive Director
USAEyes.org
Patient Advocacy Surgeon Certification

"Consider and Choose With Confidence"

Email to glenn dot hagele at usaeyes dot org

http://www.USAEyes.org
http://www.ComplicatedEyes.org

I am not a doctor.

Wow! Thanks for taking the time to offer the very detailed and helpful
explanation.

I'll take some time to digest what you have written and try the experiments
you suggested.

My next appointment to check the IOLs is in about the three months. From
what I've read it can take from three to six months for the brain to learn
to work with the new parts. In three months at my next appointment I will
thoroughly discuss this phenomena with the surgeon. Maybe by then the
conditions will have changed.

So far I'm quite pleased with the IOLs and have no regrets. Being rid of
glasses except for the computer is worth whatever trade offs I have
experienced so far. I can always move the monitor a bit closer, that's easy
enough.

Thanks again.
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