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Proteins, linked to pancreatic cancer spread, found
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J
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 612

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 5:00 pm    Post subject: Proteins, linked to pancreatic cancer spread, found Reply with quote

<http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=scienceNews&storyID=2006-07-18T113652Z_01_L18240033_RTRUKOC_0_US-CANCER-PANCREAS.xml>

Proteins linked to pancreatic cancer spread found
Tue Jul 18, 2006 7:37am ET170

By Patricia Reaney

LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists said on Tuesday they have discovered two
proteins that act like an engine for pancreatic cancer cells and might
explain why it is such an aggressive disease.

The proteins called CapG and Gelsolin regulate cell movement. Unusually
high concentrations are found in cancerous tissue and could be involved in
the spread of the disease to other areas of the body.

"These proteins may play a fundamental role in the aggressive spread and
growth of pancreatic tumors," said Dr Eithne Costello of the University of
Liverpool in northern England.

About 216,000 new cases of pancreatic cancer are reported each year, most
in developed countries, according to the International Agency for Research
on Cancer in Lyon, France.

The Italian singer Luciano Pavarotti was recently diagnosed and had
surgery for pancreatic cancer.

"Understanding how it spreads is a priority. We need to know how this
disease spreads in order to be able to target new treatments. With these
two molecules we have identified players in the ability to spread,"
Costello, a molecular biologist, said in an interview.

The disease is most common in people 60 years or older. It is usually not
detected until the cancer is in an advanced stage when it has spread
beyond the pancreas which makes it more difficult to treat.

The scientists, whose findings are reported online by the journal Gut,
studied the proteins that could potentially be new drug targets in samples
of cancerous and healthy tissue in the laboratory.

When they lowered the amounts of CapG and Gelsolin in the cancerous tissue
it reduced the spread of the cancerous cells. They also found that the
amount of CapG found in the nucleus of cancerous cells was proportional to
the size of the tumour.

Costello and her team also noticed that patients with low or undetectable
levels of Gelsolin had a better prognosis. She added that in order to
tackle the disease scientists must do a number of things.

"We need to understand the biology behind it.

We need to catch it early and to find improved treatments."

© Reuters 2006. All Rights Reserved.


gel·sol·in Pronunciation (jlsln)
n.
A calcium-dependent actin-binding protein that modulates actin filament
length and gelation and thus influences the structure of the cytoskeleton
and plays a key role in cellular motility and differentiation.

Alternative names for Actin Regulatory Protein CAPG antibody (ab14235)
Actin regulatory protein CAP G antibody
AFCP antibody
Capping protein (actin filament) gelsolin like antibody
Gelsolin like capping protein antibody
Macrophage capping protein antibody
MCP antibody

http://www.medicine.ufl.edu/infecdis/southwick_lab/capg.htm
n the macrophage, control of actin dynamics is achieved in part by the
participation of Cap G, a protein discovered in this laboratory. This
calcium-sensitive actin filament capping protein can regulate the assembly
and disasssembly of actin-cytoskeleton during macrophage movement. CapG
binds the barbed or rapid growing end of actin filaments in the presence
of calcium. When the calcium concentration is lowered CapG dissociates
from the barbed end allowing actin assembly to again occur. PCR generated
point mutations have been made in the molecule to assess the relationship
between primary structure and function. We have created gain-of-function
mutations that convert CapG from a capping to a capping and severing
protein addition. In collaboration with Dr. Stephen Almo (Albert Einstein
University) we are presently crystallizing wild-type and the severing
mutant and have begun to map their tertiary structure.
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J W
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 10 May 2006
Posts: 22

PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 12:08 am    Post subject: Re: Proteins, linked to pancreatic cancer spread, found Reply with quote

If I am reading this statement correctly it seems that the spread of
this disease may be correlated to the calcium level of the patient?? as
it says presence of higher rates of calcium produce disassotiation
(reduced progression) and lower rats of calcium allow for more
association (spread)

My neighbor is stage 4 pancreas cancer and has pretty much exhausted all
treatment options. She is barely hanging on.. I know for fact she is
lactose/dairy product intolerant and thus would suspect lower calcium
levels. Do you think something as simple as some calcium infusions may
help stabilize her for a while??



Proteins, linked to pancreatic cancer spread, found

Group: sci.med.diseases.cancer Date: Tue, Jul 18, 2006, 1:00pm From:
macyinno@nospam.inv (J)
<http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=scienceNews&storyID=2006-07-18T113652Z_01_L18240033_RTRUKOC_0_US-CANCER-PANCREAS.xml>
Proteins linked to pancreatic cancer spread found Tue Jul 18, 2006
7:37am ET170
By Patricia Reaney
LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists said on Tuesday they have discovered two
proteins that act like an engine for pancreatic cancer cells and might
explain why it is such an aggressive disease.
The proteins called CapG and Gelsolin regulate cell movement. Unusually
high concentrations are found in cancerous tissue and could be involved
in the spread of the disease to other areas of the body.
"These proteins may play a fundamental role in the aggressive spread and
growth of pancreatic tumors," said Dr Eithne Costello of the University
of Liverpool in northern England.
About 216,000 new cases of pancreatic cancer are reported each year,
most in developed countries, according to the International Agency for
Research on Cancer in Lyon, France.
The Italian singer Luciano Pavarotti was recently diagnosed and had
surgery for pancreatic cancer.
"Understanding how it spreads is a priority. We need to know how this
disease spreads in order to be able to target new treatments. With these
two molecules we have identified players in the ability to spread,"
Costello, a molecular biologist, said in an interview.
The disease is most common in people 60 years or older. It is usually
not detected until the cancer is in an advanced stage when it has spread
beyond the pancreas which makes it more difficult to treat.
The scientists, whose findings are reported online by the journal Gut,
studied the proteins that could potentially be new drug targets in
samples of cancerous and healthy tissue in the laboratory.
When they lowered the amounts of CapG and Gelsolin in the cancerous
tissue it reduced the spread of the cancerous cells. They also found
that the amount of CapG found in the nucleus of cancerous cells was
proportional to the size of the tumour.
Costello and her team also noticed that patients with low or
undetectable levels of Gelsolin had a better prognosis. She added that
in order to tackle the disease scientists must do a number of things.
"We need to understand the biology behind it.
We need to catch it early and to find improved treatments."
© Reuters 2006. All Rights Reserved.
gel·sol·in Pronunciation (jlsln)
n.
A calcium-dependent actin-binding protein that modulates actin filament
length and gelation and thus influences the structure of the
cytoskeleton and plays a key role in cellular motility and
differentiation.
Alternative names for Actin Regulatory Protein CAPG antibody (ab14235)
Actin regulatory protein CAP G antibody
AFCP antibody
Capping protein (actin filament) gelsolin like antibody Gelsolin like
capping protein antibody
Macrophage capping protein antibody
MCP antibody
http://www.medicine.ufl.edu/infecdis/southwick_lab/capg.htm n the
macrophage, control of actin dynamics is achieved in part by the
participation of Cap G, a protein discovered in this laboratory. This
calcium-sensitive actin filament capping protein can regulate the
assembly and disasssembly of actin-cytoskeleton during macrophage
movement. CapG binds the barbed or rapid growing end of actin filaments
in the presence of calcium. When the calcium concentration is lowered
CapG dissociates from the barbed end allowing actin assembly to again
occur. PCR generated point mutations have been made in the molecule to
assess the relationship between primary structure and function. We have
created gain-of-function mutations that convert CapG from a capping to a
capping and severing protein addition. In collaboration with Dr. Stephen
Almo (Albert Einstein University) we are presently crystallizing
wild-type and the severing mutant and have begun to map their tertiary
structure.
Back to top
J
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 612

PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 8:40 am    Post subject: Re: Proteins, linked to pancreatic cancer spread, found Reply with quote

J W wrote:

Quote:
If I am reading this statement correctly it seems that the spread of
this disease may be correlated to the calcium level of the patient?? as
it says presence of higher rates of calcium produce disassotiation
(reduced progression) and lower rats of calcium allow for more
association (spread)

My neighbor is stage 4 pancreas cancer and has pretty much exhausted all
treatment options. She is barely hanging on.. I know for fact she is
lactose/dairy product intolerant and thus would suspect lower calcium
levels. Do you think something as simple as some calcium infusions may
help stabilize her for a while??

No and No.
You can't "connect the dots" that way.
Even they don't know the signficance or relevance.
Sometimes I think they release this "news" (long before they know if the research will lead to anything useful) to find investors so they can
continue their research.

Sorry to hear about your neighbor.
J

Quote:
Proteins, linked to pancreatic cancer spread, found

Group: sci.med.diseases.cancer Date: Tue, Jul 18, 2006, 1:00pm From:
macyinno@nospam.inv (J)
http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=scienceNews&storyID=2006-07-18T113652Z_01_L18240033_RTRUKOC_0_US-CANCER-PANCREAS.xml
Proteins linked to pancreatic cancer spread found Tue Jul 18, 2006
[...]
"Understanding how it spreads is a priority. We need to know how this
disease spreads in order to be able to target new treatments. With these
two molecules we have identified players in the ability to spread,"
Costello, a molecular biologist, said in an interview.
The disease is most common in people 60 years or older. It is usually
not detected until the cancer is in an advanced stage when it has spread
beyond the pancreas which makes it more difficult to treat.
The scientists, whose findings are reported online by the journal Gut,
studied the proteins that could potentially be new drug targets in
samples of cancerous and healthy tissue in the laboratory.
When they lowered the amounts of CapG and Gelsolin in the cancerous
tissue it reduced the spread of the cancerous cells. They also found
that the amount of CapG found in the nucleus of cancerous cells was
proportional to the size of the tumour.
Costello and her team also noticed that patients with low or
undetectable levels of Gelsolin had a better prognosis. She added that
in order to tackle the disease scientists must do a number of things.
"We need to understand the biology behind it.
We need to catch it early and to find improved treatments."
© Reuters 2006. All Rights Reserved.
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