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Authors of JAMA Study on Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy Did Not Disclose Relationships With Drug Companies
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@reastimplantAwareness.or
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 11 Jul 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 9:37 pm    Post subject: Authors of JAMA Study on Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy Did Not Disclose Relationships With Drug Companies Reply with quote

Note from Ilena Rosenthal: Reading this makes me wonder what
psychiatrists do NOT have financial ties to the pharma industry. No
wonder medications are frighteningly expensive! And would this be
considered a 'peer reviewed' study where all the peers are also on the
Pharma Dole?

www.BreastImplantAwareness.org/QuackWatchWatch.htm


http://www.kaisernetwork.org/daily_reports/rep_index.cfm?DR_ID=38403

Pregnancy & Childbirth | Authors of JAMA Study on Antidepressant Use
During Pregnancy Did Not Disclose Relationships With Drug Companies
[Jul 11, 2006]

Most of the 13 physicians who co-authored a study regarding
depression relapse risk for women who stop taking their medication
during pregnancy -- published in the Feb. 1 edition of the Journal of
the American Medical Association -- did not disclose more than 60
financial relationships to pharmaceutical companies, the Wall Street
Journal reports (Armstrong, Wall Street Journal, 7/11). The study,
funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, questions the
commonly held belief that hormones produced during pregnancy protect
women from depression. Lee Cohen, director of Massachusetts General
Hospital's Center for Women's Mental Health, and colleagues between
1999 and 2003 monitored 201 pregnant women with a history of
depression. The women were taking medications such as Prozac, Zoloft,
Effexor and Paxil. Researchers found that 68% of the women who stopped
taking antidepressants relapsed into depression during pregnancy. In
addition, 26% of the women who continued taking their medication
during pregnancy also became depressed (Kaiser Daily Women's Health
Policy Report, 2/2). According to the Journal, the study did not
disclose that Cohen is a consultant to three pharmaceutical companies
and a paid speaker for seven drugmakers or that some of his research
is funded by four such companies. The second listed author of the
study -- Lori Altshuler, director of the Mood Disorders Research
Program at the University of California-Los Angeles -- is a consultant
or speaker for at least five drug companies, affiliations that were
not disclosed. Adele Viguera, associate director of MGH's perinatal
psychiatry program and co-author of the study, did not disclose that
she is a member of GlaxoSmithKline's speakers bureau. The study did
disclose the financial ties to drug companies of two of the authors,
Zachary Stowe and Jeffrey Newport of Emory University.

Previous Studies
The study is the first major research paper to establish a relapse
risk for pregnant women who stop taking antidepressants, the Journal
reports. Previous studies have questioned the safety of antidepressant
use during pregnancy. One study found an increased risk of an infant
experiencing a potentially fatal lung disorder if the woman takes a
group of antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitors during pregnancy, and two other studies found that use of
GSK's Paxil during pregnancy could cause cardiac fetal heart defects.
The results of those studies are being called into question by
industry-paid experts in the field, according to the Journal.

JAMA, Authors' Reactions
JAMA said that its policy requires study authors to disclose all ties
to the medical industry, the Journal reports. JAMA editor-in-chief
Catherine DeAngelis said the journal was not aware of the
relationships some of the study's authors had with drug companies, and
"[a]s soon as JAMA found out that they didn't disclose, we contacted
.... Cohen and asked for his explanation." She added, "We have one and
it will be published very soon in an upcoming issue of JAMA."
According to the Journal, the researchers "maintain that their
financial links have no bearing on their research work or what they
say about antidepressant use during pregnancy in interviews or
lectures." Cohen said that "it didn't seem relevant" for him and other
co-authors to disclose their financial ties in part because the study
was funded by a federal health agency. He declined to describe his
consulting role to drug companies or how much he is paid for the role,
but he did say that drug companies "tend to pick people who are
experts in this area" and "we are not talking about megabucks."
Viguera said that because of the way the study was designed, he does
not "see how any kind of relationship [the researchers] have with a
pharmaceutical company plays a role in that." He added, "I don't
believe there is a conflict of interest."

Other Reaction
According to the Journal, "industry-paid opinion leaders have become
dominant authorities" in the field of antidepressant use during
pregnancy, and they often assist in developing clinical guidelines,
are members of journal editorial boards, provide counsel to government
agencies and teach courses to other physicians. "Whether or not to
keep taking an antidepressant during pregnancy is a critical question
for pregnant women suffering from depression," Adam Urato, a
Bradenton, Fla.-based obstetrician and perinatologist who has
questioned Cohen and his colleagues about their financial ties, said,
adding, "What these pregnant women and the providers who care for them
need is expert advice that is free from pharmaceutical industry
influence or the suggestion of bias that results when these experts
are being paid by many antidepressant manufacturers." A Pfizer
spokesperson said, "It is important to remember that this is a
partnership with the mutual goal of advancing science and enhancing
patient care." Nada Stotland, a professor of obstetrics and psychiatry
at Rush Medical College in Chicago, said pharmaceutical companies have
the resources needed to fill a research void on the effects of
antidepressants during pregnancy, but they often "only do what they
are required to do" by FDA. She added that there are few studies that
examine the effects of antidepressant alternatives, such as
psychotherapy, on treating depression among pregnant women. Alan
Gelenberg, head of the psychiatry department of the University of
Arizona and editor of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, said less
than 5% of his income comes from consulting work with pharmaceutical
companies, adding, "The problem is if you want an expert on
antidepressants in pregnancy, most of us have taken some industry
money." Gelenberg said the answer to industry-funded experts is
increased funding from government and independent sources (Wall Street
Journal, 7/11).




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Newsgroup Leader Katheen
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 20 Jan 2006
Posts: 654

PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 11:57 pm    Post subject: Re: Authors of JAMA Study on Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy Did Not Disclose Relationships With Drug Companies Reply with quote

This is also how they all keep from being sued.
They all sign their name to the crime, making it
not a crime.

Kathleen

<BreastimplantAwareness.org> wrote:
Quote:
Note from Ilena Rosenthal: Reading this makes me wonder what
psychiatrists do NOT have financial ties to the pharma industry. No
wonder medications are frighteningly expensive! And would this be
considered a 'peer reviewed' study where all the peers are also on the
Pharma Dole?

www.BreastImplantAwareness.org/QuackWatchWatch.htm


http://www.kaisernetwork.org/daily_reports/rep_index.cfm?DR_ID=38403

Pregnancy & Childbirth | Authors of JAMA Study on Antidepressant Use
During Pregnancy Did Not Disclose Relationships With Drug Companies
[Jul 11, 2006]

Most of the 13 physicians who co-authored a study regarding
depression relapse risk for women who stop taking their medication
during pregnancy -- published in the Feb. 1 edition of the Journal of
the American Medical Association -- did not disclose more than 60
financial relationships to pharmaceutical companies, the Wall Street
Journal reports (Armstrong, Wall Street Journal, 7/11). The study,
funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, questions the
commonly held belief that hormones produced during pregnancy protect
women from depression. Lee Cohen, director of Massachusetts General
Hospital's Center for Women's Mental Health, and colleagues between
1999 and 2003 monitored 201 pregnant women with a history of
depression. The women were taking medications such as Prozac, Zoloft,
Effexor and Paxil. Researchers found that 68% of the women who stopped
taking antidepressants relapsed into depression during pregnancy. In
addition, 26% of the women who continued taking their medication
during pregnancy also became depressed (Kaiser Daily Women's Health
Policy Report, 2/2). According to the Journal, the study did not
disclose that Cohen is a consultant to three pharmaceutical companies
and a paid speaker for seven drugmakers or that some of his research
is funded by four such companies. The second listed author of the
study -- Lori Altshuler, director of the Mood Disorders Research
Program at the University of California-Los Angeles -- is a consultant
or speaker for at least five drug companies, affiliations that were
not disclosed. Adele Viguera, associate director of MGH's perinatal
psychiatry program and co-author of the study, did not disclose that
she is a member of GlaxoSmithKline's speakers bureau. The study did
disclose the financial ties to drug companies of two of the authors,
Zachary Stowe and Jeffrey Newport of Emory University.

Previous Studies
The study is the first major research paper to establish a relapse
risk for pregnant women who stop taking antidepressants, the Journal
reports. Previous studies have questioned the safety of antidepressant
use during pregnancy. One study found an increased risk of an infant
experiencing a potentially fatal lung disorder if the woman takes a
group of antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitors during pregnancy, and two other studies found that use of
GSK's Paxil during pregnancy could cause cardiac fetal heart defects.
The results of those studies are being called into question by
industry-paid experts in the field, according to the Journal.

JAMA, Authors' Reactions
JAMA said that its policy requires study authors to disclose all ties
to the medical industry, the Journal reports. JAMA editor-in-chief
Catherine DeAngelis said the journal was not aware of the
relationships some of the study's authors had with drug companies, and
"[a]s soon as JAMA found out that they didn't disclose, we contacted
... Cohen and asked for his explanation." She added, "We have one and
it will be published very soon in an upcoming issue of JAMA."
According to the Journal, the researchers "maintain that their
financial links have no bearing on their research work or what they
say about antidepressant use during pregnancy in interviews or
lectures." Cohen said that "it didn't seem relevant" for him and other
co-authors to disclose their financial ties in part because the study
was funded by a federal health agency. He declined to describe his
consulting role to drug companies or how much he is paid for the role,
but he did say that drug companies "tend to pick people who are
experts in this area" and "we are not talking about megabucks."
Viguera said that because of the way the study was designed, he does
not "see how any kind of relationship [the researchers] have with a
pharmaceutical company plays a role in that." He added, "I don't
believe there is a conflict of interest."

Other Reaction
According to the Journal, "industry-paid opinion leaders have become
dominant authorities" in the field of antidepressant use during
pregnancy, and they often assist in developing clinical guidelines,
are members of journal editorial boards, provide counsel to government
agencies and teach courses to other physicians. "Whether or not to
keep taking an antidepressant during pregnancy is a critical question
for pregnant women suffering from depression," Adam Urato, a
Bradenton, Fla.-based obstetrician and perinatologist who has
questioned Cohen and his colleagues about their financial ties, said,
adding, "What these pregnant women and the providers who care for them
need is expert advice that is free from pharmaceutical industry
influence or the suggestion of bias that results when these experts
are being paid by many antidepressant manufacturers." A Pfizer
spokesperson said, "It is important to remember that this is a
partnership with the mutual goal of advancing science and enhancing
patient care." Nada Stotland, a professor of obstetrics and psychiatry
at Rush Medical College in Chicago, said pharmaceutical companies have
the resources needed to fill a research void on the effects of
antidepressants during pregnancy, but they often "only do what they
are required to do" by FDA. She added that there are few studies that
examine the effects of antidepressant alternatives, such as
psychotherapy, on treating depression among pregnant women. Alan
Gelenberg, head of the psychiatry department of the University of
Arizona and editor of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, said less
than 5% of his income comes from consulting work with pharmaceutical
companies, adding, "The problem is if you want an expert on
antidepressants in pregnancy, most of us have taken some industry
money." Gelenberg said the answer to industry-funded experts is
increased funding from government and independent sources (Wall Street
Journal, 7/11).




...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......
...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......
...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......
.....
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