FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   PreferencesPreferences   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Forum index » Medicine forums » nutrition
How low is too high?
Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 1 of 1 [3 Posts] View previous topic :: View next topic
Author Message
vkn
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 09 Jul 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Jul 09, 2006 6:21 am    Post subject: How low is too high? Reply with quote

Folks - We are looking out to find a few low-calorie main course or
entree or mid-day snack foods - not by using smaller plates or smaller
portions; the meal should be self-sufficient and filling for one adult
person. What do you think? Has anyone thought of limiting the number
of calories per serving in a main course? How do you track your
calorie consumption? How low is too high? Opinions please.

vkn
Chef de cuisine
My Dhaba - http://mydhaba.blogspot.com
Back to top
TC
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 1814

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 2:18 pm    Post subject: Re: How low is too high? Reply with quote

vkn wrote:
Quote:
Folks - We are looking out to find a few low-calorie main course or
entree or mid-day snack foods - not by using smaller plates or smaller
portions; the meal should be self-sufficient and filling for one adult
person. What do you think? Has anyone thought of limiting the number
of calories per serving in a main course? How do you track your
calorie consumption? How low is too high? Opinions please.

vkn
Chef de cuisine
My Dhaba - http://mydhaba.blogspot.com

For an average sized person, ensure 4 to 6 oz of meat or fish. Do not
cut back on healthy animal fats or olive oil. That, along with the meat
portion, is what makes a meal satiating and prevents the consumer from
eating too many calorie. Include your typical sides of fresh whole
produce, like broccoli, salad, carrots, potatoes, etc.

It is counter intuitive. We've had it pounded into our heads that you
have to cut fats and proteins and eat more carbs to cut fat, when the
reality is that this high carb approach does not satiate and the eater
will eat way more calories overall. But we now know that good healthy
fats and proteins is what fills us up and nourishes us and stops us
from overindulging in overall calories.

Real gourmet foods are real fresh flavorful high fat and high protein
foods. And they are extremely healthy. And as soon as you displace them
with high carb empty calories (like pasta, white bread, sugars, etc)
you are causing weight gain.

If you cook according to standard french and/or european cooking
standards, you are probably already cooking the best way possible for
weigh control. As soon as you deviate and try to up the amounts of
carbs like "low-fat" "low-calorie" pastas, breads etc, and cut the
amounts of satiating fats and proteins, you will be going against your
desired results.

TC
Back to top
Ron Peterson
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 18 May 2005
Posts: 181

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 3:15 pm    Post subject: Re: How low is too high? Reply with quote

vkn wrote:
Quote:
Folks - We are looking out to find a few low-calorie main course or
entree or mid-day snack foods - not by using smaller plates or smaller
portions; the meal should be self-sufficient and filling for one adult
person. What do you think? Has anyone thought of limiting the number
of calories per serving in a main course? How do you track your
calorie consumption? How low is too high? Opinions please.

It would be nice to have every meal balanced in terms of nutrients, but
it would require too many different ingredients in each meal especially
if calorie restricted.

I think that it would be better to try to get most of the nutrients
needed by maximizing the nutrient to calorie ratio rather than looking
at a fixed calorie limit for each meal.

I have found using a scale helps in limiting portion size. I don't
actually track calories.

Smaller portion size is part of the solution. Eat a tangerine instead
of an orange. Or split an orange with someone else.

Lower calorie density is also a help. Eat melon instead of a banana.
Eat whole wheat cooked pasta instead of bread. Eat turkey sausage
(lower fat content) instead of beef or pork sausage.

--
Ron
Back to top
Google

Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 1 of 1 [3 Posts] View previous topic :: View next topic
The time now is Tue Oct 23, 2018 2:53 am | All times are GMT
Forum index » Medicine forums » nutrition
Jump to:  

Similar Topics
Topic Author Forum Replies Last Post
No new posts Albinism and reduction of high definition receptiors biscuit vision 11 Fri Jul 07, 2006 5:31 pm
No new posts Need help with high index lense selection! Chris vision 1 Thu Jun 29, 2006 12:42 pm
No new posts Issues with my new high-index lenses... ecjose vision 8 Tue Jun 27, 2006 3:23 am
No new posts 1.6 High Index Help!!!!! Toyman vision 9 Sat Jun 24, 2006 5:17 pm
No new posts Dietary iron overload has a high mortality ironjustice@aol.com nursing 16 Mon Jun 12, 2006 5:53 pm

Copyright © 2004-2005 DeniX Solutions SRL
Other DeniX Solutions sites: email marketing campaigns , electronics forum, Science forum, Unix/Linux blog, Unix/Linux documentation, Unix/Linux forums


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
[ Time: 0.0125s ][ Queries: 16 (0.0022s) ][ GZIP on - Debug on ]