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NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack
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Roman Bystrianyk
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 454

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 2:29 am    Post subject: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

http://www.healthsentinel.com/org_news.php?event=org_news_print_list_item&id=097

"NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack",
Health Sentinel, June 26, 2006,

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDS, are assumed to be well
tolerated and are widely used as a therapy for common pain and
conditions such as arthritis. These pharmaceuticals constitute one of
the most widely used class of drugs, with more than 70 million
prescriptions and more than 30 billion over-the-counter tablets sold
annually in the United States alone. NSAIDs are called nonsteroidal
because they are not steroids. Steroids affect inflammation by
suppressing part of the immune system, which is the body's natural
healing response to trauma. Instead NSAIDs mainly inhibit the body's
ability to synthesize prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are a family of
hormone-like chemicals, some of which are made in response to cell
injury.

Unfortunately, prostaglandins are also involved in the healing
mechanism of the digestive system and because NSAIDs affect
prostaglandins they have the unwanted side effect of increasing the
possibility of gastrointestinal bleeding. According to the American
Journal of Medicine, "Conservative calculations estimate that
approximately 107,000 patients are hospitalized annually for
nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related gastrointestinal
(GI) complications and at least 16,500 NSAID-related deaths occur each
year among arthritis patients alone. The figures of all NSAID users
would be overwhelming, yet the scope of this problem is generally
under-appreciated." These conservative figures are equivalent to 293
hospitalizations and 45 deaths each day from NSAID GI complications in
U.S. arthritis patients alone.

The New England Journal of Medicine also stated "If deaths from
gastrointestinal toxic effects from NSAIDs were tabulated separately in
the National Vital Statistics reports, these effects would constitute
the 15th most common cause of death in the United States. Yet these
toxic effects remain mainly a 'silent epidemic,' with many
physicians and most patients unaware of the magnitude of the problem.
Furthermore the mortality statistics do not include deaths ascribed to
the use of over-the-counter NSAIDS."

Still more shocking is that according to the Canadian Medical
Association Journal, "All NSAIDs, both COX-2 selective and
nonselective, provide only a modest symptomatic benefit over placebo,
and this benefit has been proven only in short-term trials. With
long-term therapy, it is not known whether the benefits of this class
of drugs exceed the harms." And although COX-2 selective NSAIDs were
developed on the theory of reduced patient problems the same study in
the Canadian Medical Association Journal, states, "COX-2 selective
NSAIDs do not necessarily reduce the incidence of complicated ulcers.
Second, the meta-analysis demonstrates that, rather than proving safer,
COX-2 selective NSAIDs cause more morbidity (total SAEs or Serious
Adverse Events) than nonselective NSAIDs."

In addition to now being found increasingly just how dangerous these
medications are and that they have been only slightly more beneficial
than sugar pill, a recent study in British Medical Journal (BMJ) notes
that, "as NSAIDs were originally developed for the relief of pain,
long term placebo controlled trials have not been done."

On top of the horrifying gastrointestinal problems it has become
increasingly clear that these medications also have serious
cardiovascular risks. In the recent documentary Prescription for
Disaster, we hear former Associate Director for Science and Medicine at
the Office of Drug Safety at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) turned whistle blower David J. Graham, MD, MPH testify before
Congress in November 2004 on the Vioxx disaster. "Vioxx is a profound
tragedy and a regulator failure. We're faced with maybe the single
greatest drug safety catastrophe in the history of this country. I
strongly believe this should have been and largely could have been
avoided, but it wasn't and over 100,000 Americans have paid dearly
for this failure. In my opinion the FDA has let the American people
down."

A May 2006 study in the European Heart Journal examines the
relationship between NSAID use and the risk of a heart attack. They
performed a large population based study on over 33,000 people who had
a first heart attack also termed Myocardial Infarction or MI for short.

The authors found "a clear but moderate association (less than
two-fold) between first MI and current use of NSAIDs." The
association between first heart attack and NSAID existed in
conventional, semi-selective, and COX-2 NSAIDs. The risk of first heart
attack varied widely with celecoxib (Celebrex ®) having the lowest at
an increased risk of 6% and etoricoxib (Arcoxia®) having a huge
increased risk of 121%. The risks for first heart attack were as
follows:


Conventional NSAIDs:

Indomethacin (Indocin®) - 56%
Ibuprofen (Advil®) - 41%
Diclofenac (Voltaren®) - 35%
Naproxen (Aleve®) - 19%
Piroxicam (Feldene®) - 35%
Ketoprofen (Orudis®, Oruvail®) - 11%
Tolfenamic Acid - 39%
Other conventional NSAIDs - 23%

Semi-selective NSAIDs:

Nimesulide - 69%
Etodolac (Lodine®) - 35%
Nabumetone (Relafen®) - 26%
Meloxicam (Mobic®) - 24%

COX-2 NSAIDs:

Etoricoxib (Arcoxia®) - 121%
Rofecoxib (Vioxx®) - 44%
Celecoxib (Celebrex®) - 6%
Multiple NSAIDs - 56%


The study also shows that even after stopping taking NSAIDs users still
have increased risk of heart attack for a month after stopping.
However, after a month the risk of first heart attack was decreased to
normal. "Our findings clearly indicate that the risk is reversible
and associated with the presence of the drug in the body; the closer
the proximity of the prescription, the larger the effect."

The authors conclude, "The present large population-based
case-control study demonstrated a modest association of MI with current
use of all NSAIDs."

In the case of NSAIDs we must carefully consider a class of medication
that does not have long term placebo controlled testing, is only
moderately better in symptom relief over placebo, conservatively causes
293 hospitalizations and 45 deaths each day from gastrointestinal
bleeding, and greatly increases the chance of having a heart attack.

SOURCE: European Heart Journal, May 2006; British Medical Journal
(BMJ), 2006; Canadian Medical Association Journal, November 2002;
American Journal of Medicine, July 1998; The New England Journal of
Medicine, June 1999; Documentary: Prescription for Disaster
Back to top
nospam7@heartmdphd.com
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 27 Dec 2005
Posts: 470

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 5:25 am    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
Quote:
http://www.healthsentinel.com/org_news.php?event=org_news_print_list_item&id=097

"NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack",
Health Sentinel, June 26, 2006,

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDS, are assumed to be well
tolerated and are widely used as a therapy for common pain and
conditions such as arthritis. These pharmaceuticals constitute one of
the most widely used class of drugs, with more than 70 million
prescriptions and more than 30 billion over-the-counter tablets sold
annually in the United States alone. NSAIDs are called nonsteroidal
because they are not steroids. Steroids affect inflammation by
suppressing part of the immune system, which is the body's natural
healing response to trauma. Instead NSAIDs mainly inhibit the body's
ability to synthesize prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are a family of
hormone-like chemicals, some of which are made in response to cell
injury.

Unfortunately, prostaglandins are also involved in the healing
mechanism of the digestive system and because NSAIDs affect
prostaglandins they have the unwanted side effect of increasing the
possibility of gastrointestinal bleeding. According to the American
Journal of Medicine, "Conservative calculations estimate that
approximately 107,000 patients are hospitalized annually for
nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related gastrointestinal
(GI) complications and at least 16,500 NSAID-related deaths occur each
year among arthritis patients alone. The figures of all NSAID users
would be overwhelming, yet the scope of this problem is generally
under-appreciated." These conservative figures are equivalent to 293
hospitalizations and 45 deaths each day from NSAID GI complications in
U.S. arthritis patients alone.

The New England Journal of Medicine also stated "If deaths from
gastrointestinal toxic effects from NSAIDs were tabulated separately in
the National Vital Statistics reports, these effects would constitute
the 15th most common cause of death in the United States. Yet these
toxic effects remain mainly a 'silent epidemic,' with many
physicians and most patients unaware of the magnitude of the problem.
Furthermore the mortality statistics do not include deaths ascribed to
the use of over-the-counter NSAIDS."

Still more shocking is that according to the Canadian Medical
Association Journal, "All NSAIDs, both COX-2 selective and
nonselective, provide only a modest symptomatic benefit over placebo,
and this benefit has been proven only in short-term trials. With
long-term therapy, it is not known whether the benefits of this class
of drugs exceed the harms." And although COX-2 selective NSAIDs were
developed on the theory of reduced patient problems the same study in
the Canadian Medical Association Journal, states, "COX-2 selective
NSAIDs do not necessarily reduce the incidence of complicated ulcers.
Second, the meta-analysis demonstrates that, rather than proving safer,
COX-2 selective NSAIDs cause more morbidity (total SAEs or Serious
Adverse Events) than nonselective NSAIDs."

In addition to now being found increasingly just how dangerous these
medications are and that they have been only slightly more beneficial
than sugar pill, a recent study in British Medical Journal (BMJ) notes
that, "as NSAIDs were originally developed for the relief of pain,
long term placebo controlled trials have not been done."

On top of the horrifying gastrointestinal problems it has become
increasingly clear that these medications also have serious
cardiovascular risks. In the recent documentary Prescription for
Disaster, we hear former Associate Director for Science and Medicine at
the Office of Drug Safety at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) turned whistle blower David J. Graham, MD, MPH testify before
Congress in November 2004 on the Vioxx disaster. "Vioxx is a profound
tragedy and a regulator failure. We're faced with maybe the single
greatest drug safety catastrophe in the history of this country. I
strongly believe this should have been and largely could have been
avoided, but it wasn't and over 100,000 Americans have paid dearly
for this failure. In my opinion the FDA has let the American people
down."

A May 2006 study in the European Heart Journal examines the
relationship between NSAID use and the risk of a heart attack. They
performed a large population based study on over 33,000 people who had
a first heart attack also termed Myocardial Infarction or MI for short.

The authors found "a clear but moderate association (less than
two-fold) between first MI and current use of NSAIDs." The
association between first heart attack and NSAID existed in
conventional, semi-selective, and COX-2 NSAIDs. The risk of first heart
attack varied widely with celecoxib (Celebrex ®) having the lowest at
an increased risk of 6% and etoricoxib (Arcoxia®) having a huge
increased risk of 121%. The risks for first heart attack were as
follows:


Conventional NSAIDs:

Indomethacin (Indocin®) - 56%
Ibuprofen (Advil®) - 41%
Diclofenac (Voltaren®) - 35%
Naproxen (Aleve®) - 19%
Piroxicam (Feldene®) - 35%
Ketoprofen (Orudis®, Oruvail®) - 11%
Tolfenamic Acid - 39%
Other conventional NSAIDs - 23%

Semi-selective NSAIDs:

Nimesulide - 69%
Etodolac (Lodine®) - 35%
Nabumetone (Relafen®) - 26%
Meloxicam (Mobic®) - 24%

COX-2 NSAIDs:

Etoricoxib (Arcoxia®) - 121%
Rofecoxib (Vioxx®) - 44%
Celecoxib (Celebrex®) - 6%
Multiple NSAIDs - 56%


The study also shows that even after stopping taking NSAIDs users still
have increased risk of heart attack for a month after stopping.
However, after a month the risk of first heart attack was decreased to
normal. "Our findings clearly indicate that the risk is reversible
and associated with the presence of the drug in the body; the closer
the proximity of the prescription, the larger the effect."

The authors conclude, "The present large population-based
case-control study demonstrated a modest association of MI with current
use of all NSAIDs."

In the case of NSAIDs we must carefully consider a class of medication
that does not have long term placebo controlled testing, is only
moderately better in symptom relief over placebo, conservatively causes
293 hospitalizations and 45 deaths each day from gastrointestinal
bleeding, and greatly increases the chance of having a heart attack.

SOURCE: European Heart Journal, May 2006; British Medical Journal
(BMJ), 2006; Canadian Medical Association Journal, November 2002;
American Journal of Medicine, July 1998; The New England Journal of
Medicine, June 1999; Documentary: Prescription for Disaster

Many thanks to GOD for your giving the heads-up on what's currently
circulating about publicly about NSAIDs.

Here's an alternative that folks can ask their doctors (prescription
required) about:

http://www.limbrel.com/limbrel.php

Prayerfully in Christ's amazing love,

Andrew B.Chung
Cardiologist, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
http://HeartMDPhD.com/TheLife
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ritameetr
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 24 May 2005
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 5:39 pm    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

You would think that people would be up in arms protesting, demanding
that these class of drugs prescribed in abundance by doctors and
purchased over the counter be made safe. Every year in the U.S., at
least 107,000 individuals are hospitalized for serious gastrointestinal
toxicity from nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) use, and an
estimated 16,500 will most likely not survive the complication is
horrifying! Gastrointestinal complications of NSAIDs represents the
15th cause of death in the U.S. That does not even take in account
users of over-the-counter NSAIDs. When you stop and think about the
cost of NSAID gastrointestinal toxicity, it has been estimated at
approximately $15,000 to $20,000 per hospitalization, leading to total
annual health care expenses exceeding $2 billion. That is staggering.

Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
Quote:
http://www.healthsentinel.com/org_news.php?event=org_news_print_list_item&id=097

"NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack",
Health Sentinel, June 26, 2006,

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDS, are assumed to be well
tolerated and are widely used as a therapy for common pain and
conditions such as arthritis. These pharmaceuticals constitute one of
the most widely used class of drugs, with more than 70 million
prescriptions and more than 30 billion over-the-counter tablets sold
annually in the United States alone. NSAIDs are called nonsteroidal
because they are not steroids. Steroids affect inflammation by
suppressing part of the immune system, which is the body's natural
healing response to trauma. Instead NSAIDs mainly inhibit the body's
ability to synthesize prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are a family of
hormone-like chemicals, some of which are made in response to cell
injury.

Unfortunately, prostaglandins are also involved in the healing
mechanism of the digestive system and because NSAIDs affect
prostaglandins they have the unwanted side effect of increasing the
possibility of gastrointestinal bleeding. According to the American
Journal of Medicine, "Conservative calculations estimate that
approximately 107,000 patients are hospitalized annually for
nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related gastrointestinal
(GI) complications and at least 16,500 NSAID-related deaths occur each
year among arthritis patients alone. The figures of all NSAID users
would be overwhelming, yet the scope of this problem is generally
under-appreciated." These conservative figures are equivalent to 293
hospitalizations and 45 deaths each day from NSAID GI complications in
U.S. arthritis patients alone.

The New England Journal of Medicine also stated "If deaths from
gastrointestinal toxic effects from NSAIDs were tabulated separately in
the National Vital Statistics reports, these effects would constitute
the 15th most common cause of death in the United States. Yet these
toxic effects remain mainly a 'silent epidemic,' with many
physicians and most patients unaware of the magnitude of the problem.
Furthermore the mortality statistics do not include deaths ascribed to
the use of over-the-counter NSAIDS."

Still more shocking is that according to the Canadian Medical
Association Journal, "All NSAIDs, both COX-2 selective and
nonselective, provide only a modest symptomatic benefit over placebo,
and this benefit has been proven only in short-term trials. With
long-term therapy, it is not known whether the benefits of this class
of drugs exceed the harms." And although COX-2 selective NSAIDs were
developed on the theory of reduced patient problems the same study in
the Canadian Medical Association Journal, states, "COX-2 selective
NSAIDs do not necessarily reduce the incidence of complicated ulcers.
Second, the meta-analysis demonstrates that, rather than proving safer,
COX-2 selective NSAIDs cause more morbidity (total SAEs or Serious
Adverse Events) than nonselective NSAIDs."

In addition to now being found increasingly just how dangerous these
medications are and that they have been only slightly more beneficial
than sugar pill, a recent study in British Medical Journal (BMJ) notes
that, "as NSAIDs were originally developed for the relief of pain,
long term placebo controlled trials have not been done."

On top of the horrifying gastrointestinal problems it has become
increasingly clear that these medications also have serious
cardiovascular risks. In the recent documentary Prescription for
Disaster, we hear former Associate Director for Science and Medicine at
the Office of Drug Safety at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) turned whistle blower David J. Graham, MD, MPH testify before
Congress in November 2004 on the Vioxx disaster. "Vioxx is a profound
tragedy and a regulator failure. We're faced with maybe the single
greatest drug safety catastrophe in the history of this country. I
strongly believe this should have been and largely could have been
avoided, but it wasn't and over 100,000 Americans have paid dearly
for this failure. In my opinion the FDA has let the American people
down."

A May 2006 study in the European Heart Journal examines the
relationship between NSAID use and the risk of a heart attack. They
performed a large population based study on over 33,000 people who had
a first heart attack also termed Myocardial Infarction or MI for short.

The authors found "a clear but moderate association (less than
two-fold) between first MI and current use of NSAIDs." The
association between first heart attack and NSAID existed in
conventional, semi-selective, and COX-2 NSAIDs. The risk of first heart
attack varied widely with celecoxib (Celebrex ®) having the lowest at
an increased risk of 6% and etoricoxib (Arcoxia®) having a huge
increased risk of 121%. The risks for first heart attack were as
follows:


Conventional NSAIDs:

Indomethacin (Indocin®) - 56%
Ibuprofen (Advil®) - 41%
Diclofenac (Voltaren®) - 35%
Naproxen (Aleve®) - 19%
Piroxicam (Feldene®) - 35%
Ketoprofen (Orudis®, Oruvail®) - 11%
Tolfenamic Acid - 39%
Other conventional NSAIDs - 23%

Semi-selective NSAIDs:

Nimesulide - 69%
Etodolac (Lodine®) - 35%
Nabumetone (Relafen®) - 26%
Meloxicam (Mobic®) - 24%

COX-2 NSAIDs:

Etoricoxib (Arcoxia®) - 121%
Rofecoxib (Vioxx®) - 44%
Celecoxib (Celebrex®) - 6%
Multiple NSAIDs - 56%


The study also shows that even after stopping taking NSAIDs users still
have increased risk of heart attack for a month after stopping.
However, after a month the risk of first heart attack was decreased to
normal. "Our findings clearly indicate that the risk is reversible
and associated with the presence of the drug in the body; the closer
the proximity of the prescription, the larger the effect."

The authors conclude, "The present large population-based
case-control study demonstrated a modest association of MI with current
use of all NSAIDs."

In the case of NSAIDs we must carefully consider a class of medication
that does not have long term placebo controlled testing, is only
moderately better in symptom relief over placebo, conservatively causes
293 hospitalizations and 45 deaths each day from gastrointestinal
bleeding, and greatly increases the chance of having a heart attack.

SOURCE: European Heart Journal, May 2006; British Medical Journal
(BMJ), 2006; Canadian Medical Association Journal, November 2002;
American Journal of Medicine, July 1998; The New England Journal of
Medicine, June 1999; Documentary: Prescription for Disaster
Back to top
Bud
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 26 Feb 2006
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 12:08 am    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

Quote:
You would think that people would be up in arms protesting, demanding
that these class of drugs prescribed in abundance by doctors and
purchased over the counter be made safe.

Problem is how to be made safe and/or alternatives. Suggestions? I have
none.
Back to top
David Wright
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 750

PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 4:38 am    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

In article <1151516393.173548.29850@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com>,
ritameetr <merylnro@hotmail.com> wrote:
Quote:
You would think that people would be up in arms protesting, demanding
that these class of drugs prescribed in abundance by doctors and
purchased over the counter be made safe.

"Be made safe?" How, by waving a magic wand?

-- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
"If you can't say something nice, then sit next to me."
-- Alice Roosevelt Longworth
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vjp2.at@at.BioStrategist.
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 16 Nov 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 10:01 am    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

Aceto Salycitic Acid is still the safest thing out there..

Cox2Inhibitors tried to take all the "negative" effects out of aspirin (ASA)..

be careful what you ask for, you may get it..

- = -
Vasos-Peter John Panagiotopoulos II, Reagan Mozart Pindus BioStrategist
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/vjp2/vasos.htm
---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}---
[Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards]
[Yellary Clinton & Yellalot Spitzer: Nasty Together]
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vjp2.at@at.BioStrategist.
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 16 Nov 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 10:26 am    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

To pursue this, you need to see how prostaglandins affect heart disease..


http://rationalmedicine.org/nsaids.htm

Pain, inflammation and fever are to a large extent caused by
prostaglandins, products of arachidonic acid metabolism. The membrane
phospholipids are cleaved to produce arachidonic acid that is in turn
metabolised via the cyclooxygenase and/or lipooxygenase pathway to
produce prostaglandins and/or leukotrienes respectively.. Two
isoforms of cyclooxygenase have been identified, cyclooxygenase 1 and
cyclooxygenase 2 (COX - 1 and COX - 2). COX-1 is normally present in
all tissues while COX-2 is induced by cytokines and certain serum
factors.. Inhibition of COX-1 results in blockade of prostaglandin
synthesis in the gastric mucosa and in the kidneys, and hence in drug
induced gastritis and compromised renal blood flow.. Aspirin (acetyl
salicylic acid) irreversibly acetylates cyclooxygenase, while other
NSAIDs are reversible inhibitors by competing with arachidonic acid at
the active site on cyclooxygense. (c) Dr. B. S. Kakkilaya 2000-2003
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vjp2.at@at.BioStrategist.
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 16 Nov 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 10:34 am    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

You remember Dr Doolittle's Push-Me-Pull-You?

http://cvmedicine.stanford.edu/interventional/aspirin.html

Aspirin acetylates prostaglandin (PG) H-synthase and irreversibly
inhibits cyclooxygenase activity. In platelets the formation of
thromboxane is inhibited (thromboxane induces which inhibits platelet
aggregation and vasoconstriction). Within an hour of ingestion,
cyclooxygenase is inhibited. Although there is a theoretical
question of inducing a prothrombotic effect at high doses, in vivo
studies have not demonstrated a prothrombotic effect of ASA in doses
up to 1300 mg/day. Clinically important platelet inhibition has been
shown to occur in doses as low as 30 mg/day with minimal side effects
Back to top
Roman Bystrianyk
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 454

PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 4:53 pm    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

There are many non-toxic and safe alternatives that are worth looking
into and this is a small list just to get you started.

Evening Primrose Oil In Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis And
Side-Effects Of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Gammalinolenic Acid

Acupuncture 'works for arthritis

Acupuncture Shown to Relieve Pelvic Pregnancy Pain

Positive thinking a pain reliever

Placebo sparks brain painkillers

Vitamin E 'relieves period pain'

Carnitine Compound Eases Diabetic Nerve Pain

Yoga Eases Low-Grade Back Pain

Magnetic Bracelets Cut Osteoarthritis Pain -Study

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Evening Primrose Oil In Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis And
Side-Effects Of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
Brzeski, M., Madhok, R., and Capell, H. A., "Evening Primrose Oil In
Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis And Side-Effects Of Non-Steroidal
Anti-Inflammatory Drugs", British Journal of Rheumatology, January 1,
1991, Vol. 30, Num. 0, pp. 370-372
"Dietary fatty acids provide the direct substrates for biosynthesis of
prostaglandins and leukotrienes and altering the type of dietary fatty
acid changes the balance of prostaglandins produced during
inflammation. Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), found in evening primrose oil
(EPO) is metabolized to dihommogammalinolenic acid (DGLA) which results
in an increase of 1-series prostaglandins (PGs). PGE1 has important
anti-inflammatory actions. A previous study suggested that EPO
supplements enable up to 60% of RA patients to reduce or stop their
dose of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). ... Forty
patients were randomized into a prospective 6-month double-blind
placebo controlled study. Patients received evening primrose oil 6
g/day (i.e. 540 mg GLA/day) or placebo (olive oil, 6 g/day) in
identical capsules. EPO capsules contained 10 mg alpha-tocopherol each
as antioxidant. ... Our study found that only 23% (3/13) of patients
completing treatment with EPO could reduce their NSAID dose and none
could stop, similar to that found with placebo. This contrasts with
previous study in which the same dose of EPO enabled 25% to stop and a
further 38% to reduce NSAID dose after 6 months without clinical
deterioration."

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Gammalinolenic Acid
Leventhal L. J., MD, Boyce E. G., PharmD, and Zurier R. B., MD,
"Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Gammalinolenic Acid", Annals of
Internal Medicine, November 1, 1993, Vol. 119, Num. 9, pp. 867-873
"Design: A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled, 24 week trial.
Results: Treatment with gammolinolenic acid resulted in clinically
important reduction in the signs and symptoms of disease activity in
patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In contrast, patients given a
placebo showed no change or showed worsening of disease. Gammolinolenic
acid reduced the number of tender joints by 36%, the tender joint score
by 45%, swollen joint count by 28%, and the swollen joint score by 41%,
whereas the placebo group did not show significant improvement in any
measure. Overall clinical responses (significant in four measures) were
also better in the treatment group. No patient withdrew from the
gammolinolenic acid treatment because of adverse reactions. Conclusion:
Gammolinolenic acid in doses used in this study is well-tolerated and
effective treatment for active rheumatoid arthritis. Gammolinolenic
acid is available worldwide as a component of evening primrose and
borage seed oils. It is usually taken in far lower doses than in this
trial. ... Treatment with 1.4 g/d of gammolinolenic acid (in borage see
oil) for 6 months resulted in clinically relevant and statistically
significant reduction in signs and symptoms of disease activity in
patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In contrast, patients given a
placebo (cottonseed oil) showed worsening or no significant improvement
of disease activity. ... Patients who completed the 24 weeks of
gammolinolenic acid treatment showed statistically significant
improvement in global assessment by physicians, patient assessment of
pain using both a 5-point scale and visual analog scale, ability to
perform vocational tasks, number of tender and swollen joints, and
associated tender and swollen joint scores."

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Acupuncture 'works for arthritis'", BBC News, December 21, 2004,
Link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4111047.stm

A major study of the effect of acupuncture on osteoarthritis of the
knee has found it can both relieve pain and improve movement.

The US National Institutes of Health study concludes acupuncture is an
effective complement to standard care.

Acupuncture patients showed a 40% decrease in pain, and a nearly 40%
improvement in knee function. ...

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Acupuncture Shown to Relieve Pelvic Pregnancy Pain", ABC News, March
17, 2005,
Link:
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=KPBTBNIZX4RPACRBAEKSFEY?type=healthNews&storyID=7936881

Acupuncture and exercise can help relieve pelvic pain during pregnancy,
Swedish researchers said on Friday.

About 30 percent of pregnant women suffer pelvic pain, usually in the
back. Although doctors are not sure what causes it, they suspect a
surge in hormones during pregnancy affects muscles and ligaments.

Women can wear a pelvic belt to relieve the pain and do exercises at
home. Stabilizing exercises to improve mobility and strength is another
therapy. ...

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Positive thinking a pain reliever", BBC News, September 5, 2005,
Link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4215078.stm

US experts say they have strong scientific proof that mind over matter
works for relieving pain.

Positive thinking was as powerful as a shot of morphine for relieving
pain and reduced activity in parts of the brain that process pain
information.

The Wake Forest University researchers say their findings show that by
merely expecting pain to be less it will be less.

Their work is published in Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences. ...

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Placebo sparks brain painkillers", BBC News, August 24, 2005,
Link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4176078.stm

US researchers say they have evidence of why some people get pain
relief from sham treatment.

They looked at the so-called placebo effect - when a person is
successfully treated by a dummy drug just because they believe it
works.

Using brain scans the University of Michigan Health System scientists
found placebo treatment triggers the brains natural painkillers, called
endorphins.

Their work on 14 volunteers appears in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Physical phenomenon

Researchers have already shown that some people given a placebo
experience reduced pain sensation and have lower activity in brain
regions that process pain as a result.

....

He said that research so far suggested that 80-90% of people who
benefit from analgesic drugs would probably get relief from a placebo
too.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Vitamin E 'relieves period pain'", BBC News, April 11, 2005,
Link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4433059.stm

Taking vitamin E can significantly reduce the severity and duration of
period pain, research suggests.

The condition, also known as dysmenorrhoea, usually affects teenage
girls, and can significantly disrupt their education.

The research, by a team from Tarbait Modarres University in Iran, is
published in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

UK experts said the "breakthrough" could help thousands of young girls.
....

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Megan Rauscher, "Carnitine Compound Eases Diabetic Nerve Pain",
Reuters, January 14, 2005,
Link:
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=BDGKLEUFSL5VYCRBAELCFEY?type=healthNews&storyID=7333283

People with diabetes-related nerve damage may find pain is relieved by
taking a compound related to the popular supplement L-carnitine --
provided the treatment is started early -- according to a re-analysis
of data from two large clinical trials.

Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) is not currently approved in the US for
treating nerve pain, "but it is used widely for painful neuropathy in
patients with diabetes and AIDS in Europe," Dr. Anders A. F. Sima from
Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, noted in a
telephone interview with Reuters Health.

The original two trials -- one conducted in Europe and the other in the
US and Canada -- involved over 1000 patients with diabetic neuropathy
who were given ALC (500 or 1000 milligrams taken three times a day) or
an inactive placebo for 52 weeks.

Those tests showed ALC had no significant effect on nerve conduction
velocity, an indicator of improvement in nerve damage, but when Sima's
group looked into the data they found certain patients did benefit.

Apparently, ALC at the higher dose significantly alleviated pain in the
27 percent of patients who reported pain as "the most bothersome
symptom" at the beginning of the studies, the team notes in the medical
journal Diabetes Care.

"Pain is very common in patients with diabetic peripheral nerve
diseases, occurring in 30 percent to 35 percent of patients," Sima
said. "It is usually extremely bothersome for the patients and in
extreme cases drives them to suicide. We found that ALC has a
significant effect on pain."

The greatest reductions in pain were seen in patients who had had
diabetic neuropathy for a short time. "This is an axiom that goes for
any of these treatments in chronic disorders like this -- the earlier
you can start treatment the better," Sima advised.

He added, ALC is "very tolerable."

Sima said his team is currently working with the US Food and Drug
Administration to get ALC formally approved for painful diabetic
neuropathy.

SOURCE: Diabetes Care, January 2005.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Yoga Eases Low-Grade Back Pain", Forbes, December 20, 2005,
Link:
http://www.healthsentinel.com/admin.php?table_name=news&adminEvent=add_table_item

The next time your balky back acts up, maybe you should give the
Warrior a try. Or the Cobra. Or perhaps the Supine Butterfly.

A new study of 101 adults with chronic lower back pain compared the
benefits of yoga, conventional therapeutic exercise, and the
information contained in a popular back pain book. The result: Those
who took weekly yoga classes for 12 weeks experienced the most increase
in function and the biggest decrease in the need for pain medication.

"The study suggests that for people who are looking to do something for
themselves, you could clearly say that yoga is the best," said Karen
Sherman, an epidemiologist and researcher with Group Health Cooperative
in Seattle, and the lead author of the study.

The results of the study, which was sponsored by the National
Institutes of Health, appear in the Dec. 20 issue of the Annals of
Internal Medicine.

For the study, Sherman and her colleagues chose participants between 20
and 64 years of age who suffered from chronic but not serious back pain
-- people who "see their primary care doctor because their back is
bothering them, and they're not feeling good," she said.

The researchers divided the participants, mostly women in their 40s,
into three groups. One group took classes in viniyoga, a
therapeutically oriented style of yoga that's relatively easy to learn
and also emphasizes safety. The second group attended specifically
designed therapeutic exercise classes taught by a physical therapist,
which included strength and stretching exercises. The third group was
given a copy of The Back Pain Helpbook and asked to read it.

The participants were interviewed four times during the 26-week study,
including prior to the start the study and a follow-up at 26 weeks, to
assess their ability to do daily tasks, pain level and how much pain
medication they took.

All three groups reported improved function. But those who took the
yoga class experienced the most improvement, with 78 percent of the
group improving by at least two points on a standardized measure called
the Roland Disability Scale, which assesses how people can perform
daily tasks, such as walking up stairs without pain or bending over to
tie shoelaces. Sixty-three percent who took the exercise class reported
at least a two-point improvement, while 47 percent of those who read
the book reported a similar benefit, Sherman said.

The yoga participants also reduced their use of pain medicine more than
those in the other two groups. By the end of the 26 weeks, only 21
percent in the yoga class were taking medication for their back pain;
58 percent had been doing so before starting the yoga class. The use of
pain medicine for the exercise group dropped to 50 percent from 57
percent, while those who read the book increased their use of pain
medication -- from 50 percent to 59 percent, the researchers said.
Sherman said yoga may be more effective in helping with back pain
because many people are unaware how they move their bodies. And the
breathing that is a component of yoga makes people more conscious of
their bodies and of ways they move that might contribute to their back
problems, she said.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Magnetic Bracelets Cut Osteoarthritis Pain -Study", Reuters UK,
December 17, 2004,
Link:
http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=RFCKBYLM1PYWECRBAEZSFFA?type=healthNews&storyID=7126141

Magnetic bracelets can help to ease the pain of osteoarthritis of the
hip and knee, British researchers said on Friday.

In a study of nearly 200 sufferers of the joint disease, patients who
wore a standard-strength magnetic bracelet reported having less pain
than those who wore weaker or non-magnetic bracelets for 12 weeks.

"We found evidence of a beneficial effect of magnetic wrist bracelets
on the pain of osteoarthritis of the hip and knee," Professor Edzard
Ernst, of the Peninsula Medical School in Plymouth, southern England,
said in a report in the British Medical Journal.

Although the results are consistent with previous studies that analyzed
magnetic therapy, the scientists said they did not know whether the
reported improvement was due to the bracelet, the placebo effect, a
believed benefit from a treatment that has no effect, or both.

"Whatever the mechanism, the benefit from magnetic bracelets seems
clinically useful," Ernst and his colleagues added.

The patients wearing the higher strength magnetic bracelets reported
the biggest improvement, which the scientists said suggested the
magnetic strength is important. The benefits were in addition to
improvements from standard treatments for the illness.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, which is a leading
cause of disability. It can affect any joint in the body but is common
in the knees and hips. Pain in a joint after inactivity, swelling and
stiffness are symptoms. There is no cure but treatments can reduce pain
and maintain movement.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Jim Chinnis
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 1030

PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 6:27 pm    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

"Roman Bystrianyk" <rbystrianyk@gmail.com> wrote in part:

Quote:
There are many non-toxic and safe alternatives that are worth looking
into and this is a small list just to get you started.

Evening Primrose Oil In Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis And
Side-Effects Of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Gammalinolenic Acid

Acupuncture 'works for arthritis

Acupuncture Shown to Relieve Pelvic Pregnancy Pain

Positive thinking a pain reliever

Placebo sparks brain painkillers

Vitamin E 'relieves period pain'

Carnitine Compound Eases Diabetic Nerve Pain

Yoga Eases Low-Grade Back Pain

Magnetic Bracelets Cut Osteoarthritis Pain -Study

Narcotics actually work best.
--
Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA
Back to top
Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 8540

PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 8:34 pm    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

Jim Chinnis wrote:
Quote:
"Roman Bystrianyk" <rbystrianyk@gmail.com> wrote in part:

There are many non-toxic and safe alternatives that are worth looking
into and this is a small list just to get you started.

Evening Primrose Oil In Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis And
Side-Effects Of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Gammalinolenic Acid

Acupuncture 'works for arthritis

Acupuncture Shown to Relieve Pelvic Pregnancy Pain

Positive thinking a pain reliever

Placebo sparks brain painkillers

Vitamin E 'relieves period pain'

Carnitine Compound Eases Diabetic Nerve Pain

Yoga Eases Low-Grade Back Pain

Magnetic Bracelets Cut Osteoarthritis Pain -Study

Narcotics actually work best.

Except for their abuse/addiction potential.

Prayerfully in Christ's amazing love,

Andrew
http://HeartMDPhD.com/TheLife
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Roman Bystrianyk
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 454

PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2006 10:24 pm    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

Quote:

Narcotics actually work best.
--
Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA

"All NSAIDs, both COX-2 selective and nonselective, provide only a
modest symptomatic benefit over placebo, and this benefit has been
proven only in short-term trials. With long-term therapy, it is not
known whether the benefits of this class of drugs exceed the harms." -
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Back to top
vjp2.at@at.BioStrategist.
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 16 Nov 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2006 9:38 am    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

That brings up another issue: PAIN IS AN ALARM!

Killing pain is like shooting a fire alarm when it goes off.

Resorting to pain killing is in a way admitting the problem can't be fixed.

- = -
Vasos-Peter John Panagiotopoulos II, Reagan Mozart Pindus BioStrategist
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/vjp2/vasos.htm
---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}---
[Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards]
[Yellary Clinton & Yellalot Spitzer: Nasty Together]
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vjp2.at@at.BioStrategist.
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 16 Nov 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2006 9:49 am    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

Back when SSRIs (eg Prozac) debuted there was talk of using
tricyclic antidepressants as pain killing patches.

I prefer acetamenaphen ointments and patches because they delivers
the pain killing to the site without messing up your internal organs as much.

The way immodium/loperamide is a large morphine molecule that stays
in your gut (and out of your blood) also offers a clue. Maybe they
could make morphine that only works on joints and doesn't mess with
your brain. Still, morphine destroys circulation and hastens death in
all cases. My dentist said she had patients who ulcerated their mouths
by abusing otc oral painkillers. When I was in college, the adjacent
hospital was always full of legless heroine addicts.

I would rather have medicine that rebuilds the joints than painkillers.


- = -
Vasos-Peter John Panagiotopoulos II, Reagan Mozart Pindus BioStrategist
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/vjp2/vasos.htm
---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}---
[Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards]
[Yellary Clinton & Yellalot Spitzer: Nasty Together]
Back to top
Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 8540

PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2006 5:48 pm    Post subject: Re: NSAIDs (Advil, Aleve, Vioxx...) increases risk of first heart attack Reply with quote

vjp2.at@at.BioStrategist.dot.dot.com wrote:
Quote:
That brings up another issue: PAIN IS AN ALARM!

Killing pain is like shooting a fire alarm when it goes off.

Resorting to pain killing is in a way admitting the problem can't be fixed.

Correct. Thankfully, Limbrel is not a pain killer but an effective
anti-inflammatory.

Prayerfully in Christ's amazing love,

Andrew
http://HeartMDPhD.com/TheLife
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Google

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