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Coconut Oil Benefits?
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Marshall Price
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 29 Apr 2006
Posts: 22

PostPosted: Fri May 26, 2006 1:31 pm    Post subject: Re: Coconut Oil Benefits? Reply with quote

Aha!

But why do you say, "As AA is a precursor of prostaglandins..., it is
reasonable to set a limit to...linoleic acid...", without recommending a
limit on AA itself?

And aren't "regulation of immunity" and "to control inflammation" more
or less similar and both very good things: so the more AA, the better?!

Also, wasn't AA once considered essential?

What about arachidic acid (20:0), which is probably Jimmy Carter's
favorite? Is it essential? Poison? Good for frying chicken?


Feel free to tell me to get lost; I'm lost already. :)


Juhana Harju wrote:
Quote:
Knack wrote:

: AA is an n-6 PUFA that is found mostly in the following cooking oils
: (in decending order): safflower, grape seed, sunflower, corn,
: soybean, sesame, peanut, canola, almond.

That is not correct, you mix things up. Arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4) is an
utterly different fatty acid than linoleic acid (18:2) high in many
vegetable oils you mentioned. AA is actually highest in animal products and
lowest in vegetable products. Probably your source of confusion is the fact
that AA can also be synthesized from linoleic acid in the body. As AA is a
precursor of prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and related compounds, which have
important roles in inflammation and in the regulation of immunity, it is
reasonable to set a limit to the intake of linoleic acid in order to control
inflammation.

Foods highest in AA - notice: no vegetable oils among these:
http://www.nutritiondata.com/foods-000064000000000000000.html


--
Marshall Price of Miami
Known to Yahoo as d021317c
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Juhana Harju
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 06 May 2005
Posts: 1056

PostPosted: Fri May 26, 2006 1:47 pm    Post subject: Re: Coconut Oil Benefits? Reply with quote

Marshall Price wrote:

: Aha!
:
: But why do you say, "As AA is a precursor of prostaglandins..., it is
: reasonable to set a limit to...linoleic acid...", without
: recommending a limit on AA itself?

I thought that it was so obvious and so I did not state it explicitely.

: And aren't "regulation of immunity" and "to control inflammation" more
: or less similar and both very good things: so the more AA, the
: better?!

Quite the opposite.

: Also, wasn't AA once considered essential?

For fetus and infants perhaps.

: What about arachidic acid (20:0), which is probably Jimmy Carter's
: favorite? Is it essential? Poison? Good for frying chicken?

I am not familiar with the substance.

: Feel free to tell me to get lost; I'm lost already. :)

No problem. But I would appreciate if you would not top post.

--
Juhana

: Juhana Harju wrote:
:: Knack wrote:
::
::: AA is an n-6 PUFA that is found mostly in the following cooking oils
::: (in decending order): safflower, grape seed, sunflower, corn,
::: soybean, sesame, peanut, canola, almond.
::
:: That is not correct, you mix things up. Arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4)
:: is an utterly different fatty acid than linoleic acid (18:2) high in
:: many vegetable oils you mentioned. AA is actually highest in animal
:: products and lowest in vegetable products. Probably your source of
:: confusion is the fact that AA can also be synthesized from linoleic
:: acid in the body. As AA is a precursor of prostaglandins,
:: leukotrienes, and related compounds, which have important roles in
:: inflammation and in the regulation of immunity, it is reasonable to
:: set a limit to the intake of linoleic acid in order to control
:: inflammation.
::
:: Foods highest in AA - notice: no vegetable oils among these:
:: http://www.nutritiondata.com/foods-000064000000000000000.html
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David R. Throop
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 08 Mar 2006
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Fri May 26, 2006 3:47 pm    Post subject: Arachidonic acid and its friends Reply with quote

In article <LqDdg.367$UT2.102@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
Marshall Price <d021317c@yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
But why do you say, "As AA is a precursor of prostaglandins..., it
is reasonable to set a limit to...linoleic acid...", without
recommending a limit on AA itself?

The issue seems to be limiting the inflammatory effects of AA. This can
be done by several approaches.
* limiting the amount of AA and its precursor linoleic acid (LA)
in the diet.
* limiting the conversion of LA to AA, done with dietary alpha linolenic
acid (ALA, flax oil, canola).
* limiting the conversion of AA to proinflammatory eicosanoids and
by promoting the formation of less- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids.
Both of these are promoted by dietary eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA,
fish oil) or by gamma linolenic acid (GLA, borage oil etc.)

See more detail at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essential_fatty_acid_interactions

DRT
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David R. Throop
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 08 Mar 2006
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Fri May 26, 2006 4:51 pm    Post subject: Re: Coconut Oil Benefits? Reply with quote

In article <lECdg.5423$921.4427@newsread4.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
Marshall Price <d021317c@yahoo.com> wrote:

Quote:
I know "arachide" means peanut in French (they also have another word,
which I forget right now), and I assumed (especially because Adele Davis
said so) that peanut oil was the richest source of arachidonic acid.

ARACHIDIC ACID is a straight chain saturated 20 carbon fatty acid. It
is abundant in peanuts. It's not particularly a player in
arteriosclerosis or inflammation. I'd suppose it has similar effect
to other saturated fats on LDL, but google scholar didn't turn up any
studies.

ARACHIDONIC ACID is a straight chain, highly unsaturated omega-6 fatty
acid. It's a major player in inflammation. The body manufactures it
from linoleic acid, or gets it from animal sources. (Cow's milk is
very low in it, though.)

Quote:
Can you point us to fount of information on these fatty acids and the
foods that contain them?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essential_fatty_acid
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essential_fatty_acid_interactions
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eicosanoid
http://www.quackwatch.org/04ConsumerEducation/davis.html :-)

DRT
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