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Steady Diet of Soy Cuts Breast Cancer Risk
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Steph
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 03 May 2005
Posts: 504

PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2006 3:25 pm    Post subject: Re: Cancer therapy based on anatomical location may soon be obsolete Reply with quote

"alex" <alex@noemail.com> wrote in message
news:upOdnWBpgcrXp9fZnZ2dnUVZ_tWdnZ2d@comcast.com...
Quote:
Cancer research is now moving to looking at the molecular level. However,
drugs that target the molecular differences between tumor and normal
cells - the altered genes or proteins or corrupted pathways - promise to
be less toxic and more effective than our current drugs.


They wouldn't have to try very hard to achieve that...........

Quote:
Therefore you are treating at the cellular level verses the effected
organ.





I wouldn't order any parade flags just yet
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Peggy
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 24 Apr 2006
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2006 1:18 pm    Post subject: re:Acupuncture in cancer treatment Reply with quote

What are the effectiveness of acupuncture in cancer treatment? Does
anyone try it before?
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AndyJ
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 24 Apr 2006
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2006 2:31 pm    Post subject: Re: Cancer therapy based on anatomical location may soon be obsolete Reply with quote

This is an interesting area worth exploring in greater detail.

I suggest that if all of the treatments currently being undertaken were done
via system like the polyMedic chemotherpay management system where an
outcome ba sed on protocol is measured - we would very quickly have a world
wide database that would show what cancers respond to what chemo protocols
without the need for costly trials.

An observational study of 20000 patients over 6 months would quickly show
which protocols give the be st outcomes despite anatomical origins.
"J" <analyse@invalid> wrote in message
news:4449F118.83AF68C8@execulink.com...
Quote:
This was posted to the prostate cancer newsgroup. i don't get it.
Therapies are supposed to be aimed at result of pathology...
Steph,, what's this saying please. Better pathology testing or testing of
more locations (when mets are present ) or ???
J

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-04/wuso-ctb041906.php
Public release date: 19-Apr-2006

Contact: [snip]
Washington University School of Medicine
Cancer therapy based on anatomical location may soon be obsolete
The results of a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in
St. Louis could eventually have oncologists removing their specialties
from their shingles by making therapy based on a tumor's anatomical
location obsolete.

When the researchers compared eight different kinds of cancerous tumors,
they saw that whether the tumor was, for instance, a breast tumor, lung
tumor or colon tumor didn't correlate to how the cancers interacted with a
standard anticancer drug.

Their findings suggest that traditional cancer treatments -- which have
established different drug regimens for brain, prostate or ovarian cancer,
for example -- should eventually be replaced with therapies that use drugs
deemed to be of highest benefit based on the tumor's pharmacologic
profile. Treatment choice would be determined by how each patient's tumor
reacts to anticancer drugs, regardless of the tumor's anatomical origin.

"This study is the first time the pathway for a drug's effect has been
analyzed in tumors from different anatomical locations," says Howard
McLeod, Pharm.D., director of the pharmacology core at the Siteman Cancer
Center and a member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Pharmacogenetics Research Network. "We've shown that drug effect is
independent of where the tumor came from in the body. If further studies
confirm that a tumor-specific approach is better than the current
anatomical emphasis, oncologists may have to stop thinking of themselves
as colon cancer or breast cancer specialists and let the cancer tell them
which drugs to use for each specific patient."

The research team analyzed 255 samples of eight different cancers --
colon, breast, prostate, ovary, lung, brain, melanoma and lymphoma -- and
measured the amounts of specific proteins known to influence the effect of
irinotecan, a commonly used anticancer agent. Their study will appear in
an upcoming issue of the Journal of Pathology.

The protein levels that determine irinotecan's effectiveness were found to
be independent of the anatomical origin of the tumor. So, for instance,
the colon tumors studied varied widely in the levels of these proteins.
The same variation in protein levels held true for all of the tumor types
the researchers examined.

"This study provides evidence that the pharmacological pathway of a drug
is important, with significant treatment implications," says Rochelle M.
Long, Ph.D., of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and
program director for the NIH Pharmacogenetics Research Network. "This work
is in keeping with an overarching Network theme of selecting therapies
tailored for individual patients instead of a one-size-fits-all approach."

The researchers found that, independent of anatomical origin, some tumors
had high amounts of irinotecan's cellular target, a protein labeled TOP1,
while other tumors had very little. Irinotecan would likely be ineffective
in tumors with low TOP1 levels. They also found that tumors varied greatly
in the amounts of proteins that transport irinotecan into and out of their
cells and in the amounts of proteins that break down irinotecan. These
variations determine how well irinotecan will work in a particular tumor.

"Because tumor response can't be predicted from anatomical location, we
should start selecting treatments based on what genes and proteins can
tell us about how the tumor will respond to a drug," says McLeod,
professor of medicine, of genetics, and of molecular biology and
pharmacology. "If we rely just on what has clinically been shown to work
in some cases for a particular anatomically defined cancer, we may not
initially choose the best therapy for the individual patient. And with
advanced cancer, a patient may get only one shot at the right therapy --
making the wrong choice could be deadly."

According to McLeod, under current treatment selection methods virtually
no chemotherapeutic drug has been successful in more than 50 percent of
patients with advanced cancer. But instead of considering a drug that
works only ten percent of the time a failure, he feels it would be better
to consider such a drug effective for one in ten tumors and to search for
the agents among the current arsenal of chemotherapeutic drugs that will
work for the rest.

"We have more than 70 FDA-approved drugs that potentially could be useful
for a particular tumor," McLeod says. "We are now working on methods that
can be used to identify those drugs that will work for each patient's
tumor."

Having a good tumor-drug match not only would improve survival rates, it
would be cost-effective, according to McLeod.

"Since modern cancer therapies can be expensive -- sometimes approaching
the cost of a bone marrow transplant -- the high cost reinforces the
necessity of choosing the right therapy the first time," he says.

Zhang W, Shannon WD, Duncan J, Scheffer GL, Scheper RJ, McLeod HL.
Expression of drug pathway proteins is independent of tumor type. Journal
of Pathology, upcoming issue.

Funding from the National Institutes of Health supported this research.

Washington University School of Medicine's full-time and volunteer faculty
physicians also are the medical staff of Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis
Children's hospitals. The School of Medicine is one of the leading medical
research, teaching and patient care institutions in the nation, currently
ranked fourth in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. Through its
affiliations with Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children's hospitals, the
School of Medicine is linked to BJC HealthCare.

Siteman Cancer Center is the only NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer
Center within a 200-mile radius of St. Louis. Siteman Cancer Center is
composed of the combined cancer research and treatment programs of
Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine.
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Steph
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 03 May 2005
Posts: 504

PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2006 3:07 pm    Post subject: Re: re:Acupuncture in cancer treatment Reply with quote

"Peggy" <peggy1306@pchome.com.tw> wrote in message
news:1145884718.025819.264510@i39g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
What are the effectiveness of acupuncture in cancer treatment? Does
anyone try it before?


It's very useful for some symptoms, but as a treatment for cancer, it's a
non-starter
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J
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 612

PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2006 8:22 pm    Post subject: Re: The contribution of cytotoxic chemotherapy to 5-year survivalinadult malignancies Reply with quote

Steve Jordan wrote:

Quote:
On April 24, J replied to me:

I wrote, in part:
It is 2006. The authors used USA data that was *seven years old* at the
time of publication and probably about the same for the Australian data
(they donít say).

J responded:
Nothing much new has changed. Herceptin for certain patients with breast cancer.

Older chemos have been tweaked for less side effects; marginal (month or few
longer survival benefit).

Iím sorry to observe that J is rather behind the times.

Taxotere (docetaxel) was approved by the FDA in *2004*, and is the first
chemotherapy drug to offer a substantial survival benefit. It is usually
used with the steroid prednisone.

http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/results/prostate-and-docetaxel0604
Chemotherapy regimens that include the drug docetaxel extend median survival by two to
three months in patients with advanced prostate cancer that is no longer responsive to
hormone therapy, two large phase III studies have shown. These are the first clinical
trials to show that chemotherapy can improve survival in advanced prostate
cancer./quote.
The rest of that page talks about median ~16-18.9 months - nothing new about that.

Quote:
The cohort of brave and selfless men who volunteered for the clinical
tests were, as my oncologist bluntly puts it, on their last legs and had
no hope. If a man is not so advanced (and more and more men are being
treated early with Taxotere these days, often with adjuvant ADT), he can
anticipate a substantial improvement on the average survival of the
experimental subjects.

As I said, those men were brave, selfless and also dedicated to helping
their brothers. All honor to them. There should be a memorial.

More can be found on the website of the Prostate Cancer Research
Institute at:
http://prostate-cancer.org/index.html

Not sure why you're pointing me there, they're all "recruiting" or "not yet
recruiting".
I'd like to hear what Steph thinks taking chemo earlier will do vis-a-vis chemo
resistance.
Cross-posting.
J
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E.Nigma
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 06 Apr 2006
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2006 11:24 pm    Post subject: Re: The contribution of cytotoxic chemotherapy to 5-year survivalinadult malignancies Reply with quote

In article <444D339D.2683057C@execulink.com>
J <analyse@invalid> wrote:
|
| Steve Jordan wrote:
|
| > On April 24, J replied to me:
| >
| > I wrote, in part:
| > >> It is 2006. The authors used USA data that was *seven years old* at the
| > >> time of publication and probably about the same for the Australian data
| > >> (they donít say).
| > >>
| > J responded:
| > > Nothing much new has changed. Herceptin for certain patients with breast cancer.
| > >
| > > Older chemos have been tweaked for less side effects; marginal (month or few
| > > longer survival benefit).
| > >
| > Iím sorry to observe that J is rather behind the times.
| >
| > Taxotere (docetaxel) was approved by the FDA in *2004*, and is the first
| > chemotherapy drug to offer a substantial survival benefit. It is usually
| > used with the steroid prednisone.
|
| http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/results/prostate-and-docetaxel0604
| Chemotherapy regimens that include the drug docetaxel extend median survival by two to
| three months in patients with advanced prostate cancer that is no longer responsive to
| hormone therapy, two large phase III studies have shown.

(SNIP SNIP)
Didn't see the first part...

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

As a cancer patient I would HAVE to ask what is the cost to benifit
ratio, using docetaxel with a Chemo regiemen? I, myself, do not
consider 2 to 3 months as a "substantial survival benefit",
especially if it causes my survivors to be rendered insolvent by the
grossly overcapitalised pharmaceutical companys, detail men, and
those who would feed off the poor withered bodies of the terminally
ill, and believe me, with 2 to 3 months, the patient is terminally
ill.

E.

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Peter Moran
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 7:30 am    Post subject: Re: The contribution of cytotoxic chemotherapy to 5-year survivalinadult malignancies Reply with quote

"E.Nigma" <NoReply@vnn.vn> wrote in message
news:Z6GBBTC838832.313599537@reece.net.au...
Quote:
In article <444D339D.2683057C@execulink.com
J <analyse@invalid> wrote:
|
| Steve Jordan wrote:
|
| > On April 24, J replied to me:
|
| > I wrote, in part:
| > >> It is 2006. The authors used USA data that was *seven years old* at
the
| > >> time of publication and probably about the same for the Australian
data
| > >> (they don't say).
|
| > J responded:
| > > Nothing much new has changed. Herceptin for certain patients with
breast cancer.
|
| > > Older chemos have been tweaked for less side effects; marginal
(month or few
| > > longer survival benefit).
|
| > I'm sorry to observe that J is rather behind the times.
|
| > Taxotere (docetaxel) was approved by the FDA in *2004*, and is the
first
| > chemotherapy drug to offer a substantial survival benefit. It is
usually
| > used with the steroid prednisone.
|
| http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/results/prostate-and-docetaxel0604
| Chemotherapy regimens that include the drug docetaxel extend median
survival by two to
| three months in patients with advanced prostate cancer that is no longer
responsive to
| hormone therapy, two large phase III studies have shown.

(SNIP SNIP)
Didn't see the first part...

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

As a cancer patient I would HAVE to ask what is the cost to benifit
ratio, using docetaxel with a Chemo regiemen? I, myself, do not
consider 2 to 3 months as a "substantial survival benefit",
especially if it causes my survivors to be rendered insolvent by the
grossly overcapitalised pharmaceutical companys, detail men, and
those who would feed off the poor withered bodies of the terminally
ill, and believe me, with 2 to 3 months, the patient is terminally
ill.

E.

Fair enough. I would make the point that the two or three months is the
median outcome. Some patients may do very much better than that and
consider it very worthwhile. Some, of course, may do much worse, but
chemotherapy is normally always given on a trial basis to those with
advanced cancer and it can be stopped as soon as it is clear that no benefit
is accruing or the patient says to. Another point is that many of these
patients will have quite severe symptoms, and relief of those for even a few
months may be valuable.

However, quality of life and cost/benefit issues certainly have to be looked
at, as you say. .

Peter Moran

www.cancerwatcher.com
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Peggy
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 24 Apr 2006
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 2:14 pm    Post subject: Re: Acupuncture in cancer treatment Reply with quote

Thanks for your information.Steph
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Peggy
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 24 Apr 2006
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 2:17 pm    Post subject: re:Acupuncture in cancer treatment Reply with quote

What are the effectiveness of acupuncture in cancer treatment? Does
anyone try it before?
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madiba
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 05 Jul 2005
Posts: 203

PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2006 7:15 pm    Post subject: Re: Acupuncture in cancer treatment Reply with quote

Peggy <peggy1306@pchome.com.tw> wrote:

Quote:
What are the effectiveness of acupuncture in cancer treatment? Does
anyone try it before?
You're nothing if not persistent lady..

In our dept its used occasionally to treat side effects of the treatment
or the disease, eg nausea, light pain. Efforts to use it directly
against tumor production eg ascites have proved fruitless..

--
madiba
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clifto
medicine forum addict


Joined: 14 Aug 2005
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 7:20 pm    Post subject: Re: Anthrax, AIDS, Cancer, Baldness Cures...when will it soar? Reply with quote

GODFATHER of the NASDAQ wrote:
Quote:
Don't forget to
call your brokers today if you wish to buy shares today.

There is a new trading symbol for Avanir and you must contact your
brokers.

Ah, a stock tout without disclaimers. The FTC likes to hear about these.
So does AOL.

--
All relevant people are pertinent.
All rude people are impertinent.
Therefore, no rude people are relevant.
-- Solomon W. Golomb
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awthrawthr@yahoo.com
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 13 Mar 2006
Posts: 122

PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2006 4:31 pm    Post subject: Re: re:Acupuncture in cancer treatment Reply with quote

Peggy wrote:
Quote:
What are the effectiveness of acupuncture in cancer treatment? Does
anyone try it before?

Years ago an accupuncturist told me that whe a person has cancer,
accupuncture isn't enough, that Chinese herbs were what's needed. (He
was Chinese.)
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Steph
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 03 May 2005
Posts: 504

PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2006 2:42 am    Post subject: Re: re:Acupuncture in cancer treatment Reply with quote

<awthrawthr@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1146760271.229791.105500@v46g2000cwv.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

Peggy wrote:
What are the effectiveness of acupuncture in cancer treatment? Does
anyone try it before?

Years ago an accupuncturist told me that whe a person has cancer,
accupuncture isn't enough, that Chinese herbs were what's needed. (He
was Chinese.)


He was also stupid
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awthrawthr@yahoo.com
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 13 Mar 2006
Posts: 122

PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2006 11:34 pm    Post subject: Re: re:Acupuncture in cancer treatment Reply with quote

Steph wrote:
Quote:
awthrawthr@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1146760271.229791.105500@v46g2000cwv.googlegroups.com...

Peggy wrote:
What are the effectiveness of acupuncture in cancer treatment? Does
anyone try it before?

Years ago an accupuncturist told me that whe a person has cancer,
accupuncture isn't enough, that Chinese herbs were what's needed. (He
was Chinese.)


He was also stupid

So says the 'genius' who claimed he had killfiled my screen name. Is
there any doubt Steph subconsciously hates himself for killing so many
people.
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Hyderman DC
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 06 May 2006
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2006 7:16 pm    Post subject: Re: Stomach cancer with a high intake of meat Reply with quote

hyderman hyderman stuart hyderman hyderman stuart
hyderman hyderman stuart
hyderman hyderman stuart
hyderman hyderman stuart
"Mr. Natural-Health" <johngohde@naturalhealthperspective.com> wrote in
message news:1146928709.257563.276550@i39g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
babawali@world.com wrote:

care. The authors saw the nitrate and nitrite like substances involved
as
the probable active factor, noting that when these levels were lowered in
europe as processing additions to food and beer the same kinds of cancer
decreased significantly.

I once got a bunch of Hickory Farms salami for X-mas. In case you
don't know, Hickory Farms is an expensive brand of beef salami.

That stuff positively game me headaches.

Nitrate and nitrite like substances is certainly close enough for me.
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