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aspirin and surgery
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Jason
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 1119

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: Intense pain in the calves ..please help ! Reply with quote

Ron,
Great post--better than mine--
I have a question for you--when you had DVT--did your leg or legs turn
blue. I have a neighbor that recently had back surgery. About two days
after the surgery--the lower part of one leg (below knee to the ankle)
turned blue. He has to use a cane in order to walk. The doctor that done
the surgery claims it is unrelated to the surgery. Could it be DVT?


In article <cvj14902htk@news3.newsguy.com>, "Ron G" <ron@gould.net> wrote:

Quote:
Intense pain in the calves ..please help !
He asks his sons to apply pressure by standing or sitting on his
calves. This seems to help sometimes.

It (could) be DVT also. Deep Venous Thrombosis in your calves. (Blood Clots)
They hurt like hell---
I had/have it, and there is intense pain in the upper part of the calf,
where it feels like there is a "vee" where two muscles curve apart.
About 2 inches below your knee, in the back.
Doctor checked it out with her fingers, then an ER Dye Test.
One thing--when I pushed with my thumb on the painful area like she did, she
got extremly excited and strongly said
"DON'T DO THAT!!!"
"You may dislodge a clot!, and it will go straight to your lungs as an
Pulmonary Embolism!"
See a Doc, and if it continues, go to the ER.
I got where it was very painful to even press on the car's gas pedal.
My Dr , seeing it, told me to go STRAIGHT to the ER, and absolutely NOT
drive home to get any clothes or whatever.
They put me on Heparin blood thinner for a week, IV, hospital stay.
Now I am on blood thinner for the rest of my life, to help prevent clots.
Sorry for the capitols, I'm just repeating how the Dr said it.

Best to you---
Ron



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Don Miller
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 19 May 2005
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: Advertising and prescription practices. Was: Re: FDA Panel: Celebrex, Bextra and Vioxx Should Remain on Market Reply with quote

Isn't the larger question whether the phenomenon of direct-to-consumer
advertising (along with other factors) doesn't lead to the prescription of
high-profit drugs that are in the marketing spotlight, in preference to
other agents that might be better, but make somebody less money? In this
area, the under-use of meloxicam in North America, and the virtual
abandonment of Disalcid (salsalate), which for some patients is a perfect
and ultra-safe choice, are prime examples.

DM

On Fri, 25 Feb 2005, Steve wrote:

Quote:
kron <kron@no.sp.net> wrote:
Ten of the 32 U.S. advisers who
supported future sales of pain relievers Celebrex, Bextra and Vioxx
have consulted in recent years for the drug makers

This is not unusual. Disclosure is an issue, but it's otherwise
pretty tough to find the expertise, since big pharma funds most of the
drug studies, and many of the best docs have some tie to the industry.

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Repeating Rifle
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 141

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

in article jason-2003050919150001@pm1-broad-70.snlo.dialup.fix.net, Jason at
jason@nospam.com wrote on 3/20/05 9:19 AM:

Quote:
They now have special aspiren tablets designed for people that are over
50. For example--Bayer makes a product called "Bayer enteric safety coated
low strength Aspiren Regiment" I take one pill a day.

Such 81mg doses are also available from Costco. Probably various drug chains
have their equivalent house brands. It amazes how Bayer drums up demand for
their brand by marketing. There is an old Barnum saying.

Bill
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halo2 guy
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 46

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

you have got to be kidding me... Wow..you must be shopping at a small
store... The profits are so much greater on generics also. I am surprised
the store doesn't carry them.



"Jason" <jason@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:jason-2003051236040001@pm4-broad-57.snlo.dialup.fix.net...
Quote:
halo2 guy,
Great point. The grocery store where I shop only has the Bayer enteric low
dose aspirins. If they had a generic brand next to it on the shelf--I
would buy it.



In article <FIWdnUBh04JtXqDfRVn-2Q@comcast.com>, "halo2 guy"
somewhereovethe@rainbow.com> wrote:

There is no logical reason to purchase an expensive name brand item such
as
aspirin that has been around forever and costs just a few cents a bottle
to
make. Purchase a generic.

Bayer has a brilliant marketing department as does Tylenol.

Aspirin is aspirin and it doesn't know if it is in a 6 year old or a 50
year old. There are generics all over that have enteric coated aspirin
even
the 81 mg 1/4 strength baby aspirin.



"RWP" <dontsendmeanycrap@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:maj%d.789$oE5.85@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...

They now have special aspiren tablets designed for people that are
over
50. For example--Bayer makes a product called "Bayer enteric safety
coated
low strength Aspiren Regiment" I take one pill a day.


But how much of a premium do they attract?

In the UK it is possible to buy 100x75mg Aspirin 75mf for aproximately
1.

Why pay any more than that for a premium produce with negligible, if
any,
benefits over the original?

Aspirin causes GI problems via its systemic effect, rather than simply
local irritation. So, enteric-coating isn't going to have a benefit1,2.



Rob

1 Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 Sep;95(9):2218-24.

Risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding associated with use of low-dose
aspirin.

Sorensen HT, Mellemkjaer L, Blot WJ, Nielsen GL, Steffensen FH,
McLaughlin
JK, Olsen JH.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University and Aalborg
Hospitals, Denmark.

OBJECTIVE: Aspirin products are known to cause irritation and injury to
the gastric mucosa. We examined the risk of hospitalization for upper
gastrointestinal bleeding with use of low-dose aspirin. METHODS: This
was
a cohort study based on record linkage between a population-based
prescription database and a hospital discharge registry in North
Jutland
County, Denmark, from January 1, 1991, to December 31, 1995. Incidence
rates of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 27,694 users of low-dose
aspirin were compared with the incidence rates in the general
population
in the county. RESULTS: A total of 207 exclusive users of low-dose
aspirin
experienced a first episode of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with
admission to the hospital during the study period. The standardized
incidence rate ratio was 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 2.2-2.9), 2.3 in
women and 2.8 in men. The standardized incidence rate ratio for
combined
use of low-dose aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
was
5.6 (95% confidence interval, 4.4-7.0). The risk was similar among
users
of noncoated low-dose aspirin (standardized incidence rate ratio, 2.6;
95%
confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) and coated low-dose aspirin (standardized
incidence rate ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-3.0).
CONCLUSIONS:
Use of low-dose aspirin was associated with an increased risk of upper
gastrointestinal bleeding, with still higher risks when combined with
other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Enteric coating did not
seem
to reduce the risk. The findings from this observational study raise
the
possibility that prophylactic use of low-dose aspirin may convey an
increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, which may offset some of
its
benefits.

2 . Which prophylactic aspirin? Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin
1997.Vol35
No.1. (R)


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teury@softwriters.com
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: First time here Reply with quote

Please give me a call, I'd really like to show you a "next generation
system" that will enable your pharmacy to scale, be more efficient, and
more profitable.

www.delphirx.com
(877) 238-4516

Hope to talk with you soon,

Todd Eury
SoftWriters, Inc.
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/LTC-Pharmacy-Software

getsumonya wrote:
Quote:
Hey Bob
I still run my pharmacy software on DOS.
It is very stable that way - but rumor has it the vendor is about to
unveil
an XP version.
But hes a very frugal and conservative guy so I'm confident we'll
accept it
with open arms ... er and checkbook.

Brad

"Bob G." <rg327_remove_@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:dm4du0llpetmbv7jo0v3t3lqjumu1utsq2@4ax.com...
On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 00:39:54, Wizard57M@SurfBest.net (Glenn
Gilbreath
Jr.) wrote:

In article <ggaFd.4451$KJ2.1169@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net
"Christian Nygaard, RPh, MBA Candidate" <cknygaard@earthlink.net
writes:
From: "Christian Nygaard, RPh, MBA Candidate"
cknygaard@earthlink.net
Subject: First time here


Hiya Christian!

Welcome aboard...I guess! I can certainly understand it
taking you an hour to configure your computer...it's probably
running Windows, probably XP!! Hehehe...me, I still use the
OLD STUFF...current "muscle machine" is a Pentium 166 w/MMX,
96 meg RAM, 2 HDs with 6.3 gigs total space...I prefer to
boot up into plain old DOS...currently in DOS 7 (the DOS from
Windows 95 A, or "OEM 1")..
snip snip snip

Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
Registered Pharmacist

============================
Glenn...
If I remember correctly you ain't no spring chicken either ( I am
62)
Maybe we both have been around long enough to still use DOS
programs
on a daily basis...

I just purchased TWO systems very much like yours last week for
$I5.00 total...I simply needed 2 cheap computers to back up the old
286's that I use in both of my garages to keep reconds on all my
cars... Price was right... and I formatted the drives and
installed
DOS 7.1 on both ... lol

Honestly you can configure almost any not NT based computer to run
most DOS programs BUT hell who needs to wait 5 minutes for a
WIN...ders based comoputer to boot...when a DOS based computer
will boot in 21 seconds...

Kind of reminds me of when we first started using computers in the
Pharmacy to fill Rx's...my comments way back then was that the
object was to get to screen number 3 or the weekend whichever came
first....when processing a RX.... SLOW SLOW SLOW...

Bob Griffiths



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Jason
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 1119

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

Wizard,
Thanks--your post makes sense and is in line with what I have read on
the subject. A question came up last week related to Ginkgo Biloba.
Would a person have the same result if he or she took one Ginkgo
Biloba pill each day instead of an aspiren pill each day?



In article <Wizard57M.267.000B9CA4@SurfBest.net>, Wizard57M@SurfBest.net
(Glenn Gilbreath Jr.) wrote:

Quote:
Ora,

The reason why the suggested dose is one aspirin daily, not weekly,
is what you mentioned...platelets are being replaced every day.
The aspirin in the low-dose 81 mg, even in a regular 325 mg tablet,
is not in high enough quantity to disable ALL the platelets in the
blood. There will still be sufficient numbers of platelets to get
the clotting process started in a bit longer time. With this in
mind, it is advisable to caution patients on aspirin therapy to be
a bit more careful around sharp objects, such as razors for shaving.
Bleeding from small nicks will take longer to stop than what they
are accustomed to. A review of appropriate first aid measures is
also a prudent consideration.

See you later!
Glenn
Wiz <{Wink
(signature below)
In article <jason-2303051624070001@pm4-broad-52.snlo.dialup.fix.net
jason@nospam.com (Jason) writes:
Date: Wed, 23 Mar 2005 16:24:07 -0800
From: jason@nospam.com (Jason)
Subject: Re: aspirin and surgery

Hello,
I am not a medical expert. It's my guess that studies have been done that
show that older people should take one aspirin per day--not one per week.
If your theory was true--the medical experts would tell us to take one
asperin per week instead of one per day. A medical expert might respond
and explain why we need one asperin per day instead of one per week.


In article <hmh3419lqcrh4plgj7bb19n41tqem4kg2q@4ax.com>,
nospam@pacbell.net wrote:

Thanks for answering my question. Now another one - if aspirin deactivates
platelets permanently, and new platelets (I presume) are produced daily to
replace those that expire, it seems to me that it would be more logical
to take
an aspirin about once a week so that we will have SOME useful platelets
which
will permit clotting but not so many that they might stick to the artery
walls.

I take an aspirin about once a week which I have heard is useful for
preventing
strokes and other bad stuff, but I still have clotting ability which I
think we
need.

Ora





On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 23:31:27, Wizard57M@SurfBest.net (Glenn Gilbreath Jr.)
wrote:
To answer the original question, regarding not taking aspirin for
at least 2 weeks prior to surgery or other invasive technique...
aspirin deactivates platelets permanently from binding to each
other. Platelet binding is one of the first steps in blood clotting.
The "turnover rate" for platelet production is roughly 4 weeks.
By not taking aspirin products for minimum of 2 weeks prior to a
surgical procedure, it allows the platelets to be replaced to a
level that promotes blood clotting, and this prevents the patient
from bleeding to death.
As far as "effective dose" for aspirin's effect on platelets, the
81 mg strength is usually plenty, and can be taken daily.
Alternatively, it is perfectly allright for a patient to take a
regular 325mg ("5 grain") aspririn tablet daily to prevent blood
clotting, as long as some monitoring of the patient's GI tract is
performed to prevent bleeding of the stomach wall, or ulcer
irritation.

C U L8R!
Wiz <{Wink
Wizard57M
Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
Registered Pharmacist
http://members.surfbest.net/wizard57m@surfbest.net/index.htm
-- DOS Internet, Close Windows and Keep the Internet Open! --

--
NEWSGROUP SUBSCRIBERS MOTTO
We respect those subscribers that ask for advice or provide advice.
We do NOT respect the subscribers that enjoy criticizing people.



Wizard57M
Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
Registered Pharmacist
http://members.surfbest.net/wizard57m@surfbest.net/index.htm
-- DOS Internet, Close Windows and Keep the Internet Open! --

--
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Dee Randall
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 13 Feb 2005
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

"Repeating Rifle" <salmonegg@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:BE1DBB57.30CC9%salmonegg@sbcglobal.net...
Quote:
in article e1fgv0thbo6a9is9q3hi826vc5qh2p2bsh@4ax.com, nospam@pacbell.net
at
nospam@pacbell.net wrote on 1/26/05 4:57 PM:

If it doesn't last that long, why the two weeks without aspirin before
surgery?

Malpractice problems?

Bill

When I have my yearly physical which includes taking a stool sample, and
they say not to take aspirin for SEVEN days before I take the sample, I have
been under the impression that aspirin can cause bleeding in the stomach,
or if you have an ulcer it can cause bleeding in the stomach.

Also my physician said that instead of a baby aspirin every day that it is
ok to take a full aspirin every other or third day and that would do just as
well. What I do is take a half-aspirin every day and sometimes skip a day.
Dee
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Jason
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 1119

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

You might be right. I believe that your original theory was based upon
your belief that an aspirin effects a human body for a full day--I don't
think that is true. It's my guess that a aspirin tablet is digested and is
out of the body in the urine or fecal material within about 2 or 3 hours.
That's probably why you have to take an aspiren pill every day instead of
once per week. Another poster recently said that Ginkgo Biloba is like
aspirin in the sense that it keeps the blood from clotting. It's my guess
that you could take Ginkgo Biloba each day instead of an aspiren--but I'm
just guessing. You would have to talk to your doctor or a medical expert
to detemine if my guess is correct. You might also do a google search on
Ginkgo Biloba to find out if I am right. I do know that there is warning
on my bottle of Ginkgo Biloba--warning me NOT to take aspirins during the
same day that I take a Ginkgo pill.


In article <tu2441p1pn61guli2p62uj6e4vbmfai4qc@4ax.com>, nospam@aol.com wrote:

Quote:
Actually I believe that studies have been done showing that taking 80 mg.
aspirin daily is likely to prevent strokes. So 80 mg. aspirin has become big
business and is widely available at higher cost than 325 mg. aspirin, and used
by older folks all over the place.

I wonder if anyone ever did a study to detemine whether taking a 325 mg.
aspirin
once a week would have the same effect. Probably no one will because such a
study would not be cost effective and would not produce the profits gleaned by
sales of 80 mg. aspirin which was formerly available for use by children
and is
now being taken regularly by millions of people who are not children.

Ora



On Wed, 23 Mar 2005 16:24:07 -0800, jason@nospam.com (Jason) wrote:

Hello,
I am not a medical expert. It's my guess that studies have been done that
show that older people should take one aspirin per day--not one per week.
If your theory was true--the medical experts would tell us to take one
asperin per week instead of one per day. A medical expert might respond
and explain why we need one asperin per day instead of one per week.


In article <hmh3419lqcrh4plgj7bb19n41tqem4kg2q@4ax.com>,
nospam@pacbell.net wrote:

Thanks for answering my question. Now another one - if aspirin deactivates
platelets permanently, and new platelets (I presume) are produced daily to
replace those that expire, it seems to me that it would be more logical
to take
an aspirin about once a week so that we will have SOME useful
platelets which
will permit clotting but not so many that they might stick to the artery
walls.

I take an aspirin about once a week which I have heard is useful for
preventing
strokes and other bad stuff, but I still have clotting ability which I
think we
need.

Ora





On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 23:31:27, Wizard57M@SurfBest.net (Glenn Gilbreath Jr.)
wrote:
To answer the original question, regarding not taking aspirin for
at least 2 weeks prior to surgery or other invasive technique...
aspirin deactivates platelets permanently from binding to each
other. Platelet binding is one of the first steps in blood clotting.
The "turnover rate" for platelet production is roughly 4 weeks.
By not taking aspirin products for minimum of 2 weeks prior to a
surgical procedure, it allows the platelets to be replaced to a
level that promotes blood clotting, and this prevents the patient
from bleeding to death.
As far as "effective dose" for aspirin's effect on platelets, the
81 mg strength is usually plenty, and can be taken daily.
Alternatively, it is perfectly allright for a patient to take a
regular 325mg ("5 grain") aspririn tablet daily to prevent blood
clotting, as long as some monitoring of the patient's GI tract is
performed to prevent bleeding of the stomach wall, or ulcer
irritation.

C U L8R!
Wiz <{Wink
Wizard57M
Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
Registered Pharmacist
http://members.surfbest.net/wizard57m@surfbest.net/index.htm
-- DOS Internet, Close Windows and Keep the Internet Open! --

--
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Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 18

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

Ora,

The reason why the suggested dose is one aspirin daily, not weekly,
is what you mentioned...platelets are being replaced every day.
The aspirin in the low-dose 81 mg, even in a regular 325 mg tablet,
is not in high enough quantity to disable ALL the platelets in the
blood. There will still be sufficient numbers of platelets to get
the clotting process started in a bit longer time. With this in
mind, it is advisable to caution patients on aspirin therapy to be
a bit more careful around sharp objects, such as razors for shaving.
Bleeding from small nicks will take longer to stop than what they
are accustomed to. A review of appropriate first aid measures is
also a prudent consideration.

See you later!
Glenn
Wiz <{Wink
(signature below)
In article <jason-2303051624070001@pm4-broad-52.snlo.dialup.fix.net> jason@nospam.com (Jason) writes:
Quote:
Date: Wed, 23 Mar 2005 16:24:07 -0800
From: jason@nospam.com (Jason)
Subject: Re: aspirin and surgery

Hello,
I am not a medical expert. It's my guess that studies have been done that
show that older people should take one aspirin per day--not one per week.
If your theory was true--the medical experts would tell us to take one
asperin per week instead of one per day. A medical expert might respond
and explain why we need one asperin per day instead of one per week.


Quote:
In article <hmh3419lqcrh4plgj7bb19n41tqem4kg2q@4ax.com>,
nospam@pacbell.net wrote:

Thanks for answering my question. Now another one - if aspirin deactivates
platelets permanently, and new platelets (I presume) are produced daily to
replace those that expire, it seems to me that it would be more logical
to take
an aspirin about once a week so that we will have SOME useful platelets
which
will permit clotting but not so many that they might stick to the artery
walls.

I take an aspirin about once a week which I have heard is useful for
preventing
strokes and other bad stuff, but I still have clotting ability which I
think we
need.

Ora





On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 23:31:27, Wizard57M@SurfBest.net (Glenn Gilbreath Jr.)
wrote:
To answer the original question, regarding not taking aspirin for
at least 2 weeks prior to surgery or other invasive technique...
aspirin deactivates platelets permanently from binding to each
other. Platelet binding is one of the first steps in blood clotting.
The "turnover rate" for platelet production is roughly 4 weeks.
By not taking aspirin products for minimum of 2 weeks prior to a
surgical procedure, it allows the platelets to be replaced to a
level that promotes blood clotting, and this prevents the patient
from bleeding to death.
As far as "effective dose" for aspirin's effect on platelets, the
81 mg strength is usually plenty, and can be taken daily.
Alternatively, it is perfectly allright for a patient to take a
regular 325mg ("5 grain") aspririn tablet daily to prevent blood
clotting, as long as some monitoring of the patient's GI tract is
performed to prevent bleeding of the stomach wall, or ulcer
irritation.

C U L8R!
Wiz <{Wink
Wizard57M
Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
Registered Pharmacist
http://members.surfbest.net/wizard57m@surfbest.net/index.htm
-- DOS Internet, Close Windows and Keep the Internet Open! --

--
NEWSGROUP SUBSCRIBERS MOTTO
We respect those subscribers that ask for advice or provide advice.
We do NOT respect the subscribers that enjoy criticizing people.



Wizard57M
Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
Registered Pharmacist
http://members.surfbest.net/wizard57m@surfbest.net/index.htm
-- DOS Internet, Close Windows and Keep the Internet Open! --
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Guest






PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

Actually I believe that studies have been done showing that taking 80 mg.
aspirin daily is likely to prevent strokes. So 80 mg. aspirin has become big
business and is widely available at higher cost than 325 mg. aspirin, and used
by older folks all over the place.

I wonder if anyone ever did a study to detemine whether taking a 325 mg. aspirin
once a week would have the same effect. Probably no one will because such a
study would not be cost effective and would not produce the profits gleaned by
sales of 80 mg. aspirin which was formerly available for use by children and is
now being taken regularly by millions of people who are not children.

Ora



On Wed, 23 Mar 2005 16:24:07 -0800, jason@nospam.com (Jason) wrote:

Quote:
Hello,
I am not a medical expert. It's my guess that studies have been done that
show that older people should take one aspirin per day--not one per week.
If your theory was true--the medical experts would tell us to take one
asperin per week instead of one per day. A medical expert might respond
and explain why we need one asperin per day instead of one per week.


In article <hmh3419lqcrh4plgj7bb19n41tqem4kg2q@4ax.com>,
nospam@pacbell.net wrote:

Thanks for answering my question. Now another one - if aspirin deactivates
platelets permanently, and new platelets (I presume) are produced daily to
replace those that expire, it seems to me that it would be more logical
to take
an aspirin about once a week so that we will have SOME useful platelets which
will permit clotting but not so many that they might stick to the artery
walls.

I take an aspirin about once a week which I have heard is useful for
preventing
strokes and other bad stuff, but I still have clotting ability which I
think we
need.

Ora





On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 23:31:27, Wizard57M@SurfBest.net (Glenn Gilbreath Jr.)
wrote:
To answer the original question, regarding not taking aspirin for
at least 2 weeks prior to surgery or other invasive technique...
aspirin deactivates platelets permanently from binding to each
other. Platelet binding is one of the first steps in blood clotting.
The "turnover rate" for platelet production is roughly 4 weeks.
By not taking aspirin products for minimum of 2 weeks prior to a
surgical procedure, it allows the platelets to be replaced to a
level that promotes blood clotting, and this prevents the patient
from bleeding to death.
As far as "effective dose" for aspirin's effect on platelets, the
81 mg strength is usually plenty, and can be taken daily.
Alternatively, it is perfectly allright for a patient to take a
regular 325mg ("5 grain") aspririn tablet daily to prevent blood
clotting, as long as some monitoring of the patient's GI tract is
performed to prevent bleeding of the stomach wall, or ulcer
irritation.

C U L8R!
Wiz <{Wink
Wizard57M
Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
Registered Pharmacist
http://members.surfbest.net/wizard57m@surfbest.net/index.htm
-- DOS Internet, Close Windows and Keep the Internet Open! --
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teury@softwriters.com
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: Partnership Opportunity Reply with quote

Oh boy. Just wait until - Mr. Adysthemic gets a hold of you.

At least in my post, spam or not, it was about PHARMACY and not
something COMPLETELY OFF TOPIC like Jewelry sales.

Can't you post this in a FORUM that is appropriate??

Do you have anything to contribute to this group with regards to
PHARMACY??
If the answer is "NO", you might want to stop posting here.

This is just plain silly.
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Ron G
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 04 Aug 2005
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: Intense pain in the calves ..please help ! Reply with quote

Jason <jason@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:jason-2402050933280001@pm1-broad-97.snlo.dialup.fix.net...
Quote:
Ron,
Great post--better than mine--
Thanks-----


Quote:
I have a question for you--when you had DVT--did your leg or legs turn
blue. I have a neighbor that recently had back surgery. About two days
after the surgery--the lower part of one leg (below knee to the ankle)
turned blue. He has to use a cane in order to walk. The doctor that done
the surgery claims it is unrelated to the surgery. Could it be DVT?

I don't know anything about the turning blue, mine didn't. Sounds like that
would be a characteristic of a lack of blood flow.
By the way, when I was in the hospital, to help insure good blood flow in my
legs, they put a heating pad under my legs, especially in the area of the
calves.
It was a floor unit, that heated water and circulated the warm water through
the "heating pad" under my calves.
It was used 24 hrs per day, all the time I was in the hospital.

I wonder if a warm pad would help his circulation?

I'm no Doctor, I can only relate my experiences, and what the Doctors did
about it.
Sorry for the long delay on replying, I was tied up, and never got back to
the computer until tonight--
Best to you---
Ron



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: Intense pain in the calves ..please help ! Reply with quote

Possibly sciatica... I'm 38 and have that in both legs. It's basically
a pinched nerve(s). The sciatic nerve starts near the tailbone area and
then branches down each leg (all the way down to the ankles in the
backs of the legs) looking almost like a wishbone in shape.

When you sit often, it puts pressure directly on the sciatic nerve in
each butt cheek.

Neurontin helped my pain from this quite a bit (non-narcotic). A
generic just came out not long ago, before then I was paying $2 a pill
and it was worth it. Calve spasms/pain can be EXTREMELY intense- I
know. You cannot sleep, you can't stand in one spot for more than 10-15
minutes, you can't sit without changing position frequently, etc. Oddly
enough walking long distances helps sometimes. I walk 3-4 miles a day,
this increases muscle tone in the legs which decreases my pain.

E-mail me direct if you wish. I know quite a lot about the medical
field, but need more details to help you guys.

James
ekgman1 yahoo.com
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Emma Chase VanCott
medicine forum addict


Joined: 15 May 2005
Posts: 58

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: Intense pain in the calves ..please help ! Reply with quote

Ron G <ron@gould.net> wrote:

: Jason <jason@nospam.com> wrote in message
: news:jason-2402050933280001@pm1-broad-97.snlo.dialup.fix.net...
: > Ron,
: > Great post--better than mine--
: Thanks-----

: > I have a question for you--when you had DVT--did your leg or legs turn
: > blue. I have a neighbor that recently had back surgery. About two days
: > after the surgery--the lower part of one leg (below knee to the ankle)
: > turned blue. He has to use a cane in order to walk. The doctor that done
: > the surgery claims it is unrelated to the surgery. Could it be DVT?

There are many factors involved in DVTs. Your buddy could have Factor 5
disorder, be a smoker, have a high CRP/homocysteine, have gum disease;
maybe didn't follow the post-op instructions about ambulation, etc etc.

See? Too many factors to say that X caused Y.

Since you don't have him and his chart in front of us, we can't say. :)

After some orthopedic surgeries, however, yes, Heparin (a blood thinner)
is given to prevent clots.

It is mostly given after Hip and Knee surgeries. I can't say for back
surgery (as spines usually fall under neurosurgery, not orthopedics).


Anything is possible -- the 100% "no" answer from the surgeon sounds
suspect.

For the Most part, though? DVTs come from laying around and being
inactive after surgery.


Emma
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: Where to buy sperm pill Spur-m ? Reply with quote

Quote:
Where to buy sperm pill Spur-m ?

Hi,

http://www.anagen.net/spermpill.htm

John
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