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aspirin and surgery
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Jason
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 1119

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

Hello,
I am not a medical expert. It's my guess that studies have been done that
show that older people should take one aspirin per day--not one per week.
If your theory was true--the medical experts would tell us to take one
asperin per week instead of one per day. A medical expert might respond
and explain why we need one asperin per day instead of one per week.


In article <hmh3419lqcrh4plgj7bb19n41tqem4kg2q@4ax.com>,
nospam@pacbell.net wrote:

Quote:
Thanks for answering my question. Now another one - if aspirin deactivates
platelets permanently, and new platelets (I presume) are produced daily to
replace those that expire, it seems to me that it would be more logical
to take
an aspirin about once a week so that we will have SOME useful platelets which
will permit clotting but not so many that they might stick to the artery
walls.

I take an aspirin about once a week which I have heard is useful for
preventing
strokes and other bad stuff, but I still have clotting ability which I
think we
need.

Ora





On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 23:31:27, Wizard57M@SurfBest.net (Glenn Gilbreath Jr.)
wrote:
To answer the original question, regarding not taking aspirin for
at least 2 weeks prior to surgery or other invasive technique...
aspirin deactivates platelets permanently from binding to each
other. Platelet binding is one of the first steps in blood clotting.
The "turnover rate" for platelet production is roughly 4 weeks.
By not taking aspirin products for minimum of 2 weeks prior to a
surgical procedure, it allows the platelets to be replaced to a
level that promotes blood clotting, and this prevents the patient
from bleeding to death.
As far as "effective dose" for aspirin's effect on platelets, the
81 mg strength is usually plenty, and can be taken daily.
Alternatively, it is perfectly allright for a patient to take a
regular 325mg ("5 grain") aspririn tablet daily to prevent blood
clotting, as long as some monitoring of the patient's GI tract is
performed to prevent bleeding of the stomach wall, or ulcer
irritation.

C U L8R!
Wiz <{Wink
Wizard57M
Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
Registered Pharmacist
http://members.surfbest.net/wizard57m@surfbest.net/index.htm
-- DOS Internet, Close Windows and Keep the Internet Open! --

--
NEWSGROUP SUBSCRIBERS MOTTO
We respect those subscribers that ask for advice or provide advice.
We do NOT respect the subscribers that enjoy criticizing people.
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getsumonya
medicine forum addict


Joined: 28 Apr 2005
Posts: 59

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: third-party payments for "pharmacy care OTC" drugs? Reply with quote

Or they could reimburse like Medicaid - pennies over cost for OTCs.
Texas Medicaid does not apply the normal dispensing fee for OTCs although we
still hafta do the same labeling and counseling.

Brad

"Paul Trusten" <ptrusten@cox.net> wrote in message
news:WX7Md.2661$7J.533@okepread04...
Quote:
Didn't that also go by state at one time? Maybe nowadays the claim is
rejected for any product not labeled "Rx Only," no matter what its legal
status in that state.

"P T" <Petepenguin@webtv.net> wrote in message
news:23723-41FDC387-180@storefull-3131.bay.webtv.net...
Or would it give pbms an excuse to reject claims for similar legend
drugs?
I'm thinking about Robitussin w/ Cod where you sometimes get the
convenient rejection: "OTCs not covered."
:-\


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Guest






PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

Thanks for answering my question. Now another one - if aspirin deactivates
platelets permanently, and new platelets (I presume) are produced daily to
replace those that expire, it seems to me that it would be more logical to take
an aspirin about once a week so that we will have SOME useful platelets which
will permit clotting but not so many that they might stick to the artery walls.

I take an aspirin about once a week which I have heard is useful for preventing
strokes and other bad stuff, but I still have clotting ability which I think we
need.

Ora





On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 23:31:27, Wizard57M@SurfBest.net (Glenn Gilbreath Jr.)
wrote:
Quote:
To answer the original question, regarding not taking aspirin for
at least 2 weeks prior to surgery or other invasive technique...
aspirin deactivates platelets permanently from binding to each
other. Platelet binding is one of the first steps in blood clotting.
The "turnover rate" for platelet production is roughly 4 weeks.
By not taking aspirin products for minimum of 2 weeks prior to a
surgical procedure, it allows the platelets to be replaced to a
level that promotes blood clotting, and this prevents the patient
from bleeding to death.
As far as "effective dose" for aspirin's effect on platelets, the
81 mg strength is usually plenty, and can be taken daily.
Alternatively, it is perfectly allright for a patient to take a
regular 325mg ("5 grain") aspririn tablet daily to prevent blood
clotting, as long as some monitoring of the patient's GI tract is
performed to prevent bleeding of the stomach wall, or ulcer
irritation.

C U L8R!
Wiz <{Wink
Wizard57M
Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
Registered Pharmacist
http://members.surfbest.net/wizard57m@surfbest.net/index.htm
-- DOS Internet, Close Windows and Keep the Internet Open! --
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RWP
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 09 May 2005
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

Quote:

Thus...enteric coating WILL/SHOULD have a protective benefit....


That's just it, it doesn't.

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6904/1/1

Part of the discussion says:-

"The enteric-coated formulations appear not to protect from the
aspirin-induced risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, irrespective of the
dose, neither for gastric nor for duodenal lesions. This observation adds up
to previous results from other investigators [4]. Assuming that the coating
of aspirin effectively spares the stomach from its topical adverse effect,
such results cast doubts on the overall contribution of the local effect in
serious bleeding lesions observed among aspirin users. Instead, our findings
support the hypothesis that the effect of aspirin, both plain and
enteric-coated, on upper gastrointestinal bleeding is mainly systemic
mediated through inhibition of platelet thromboxane A2 synthesis [19] and/or
inhibition of protective prostaglandin synthesis in the gastroduodenal
mucosa [20]. A local effect, however, cannot be ruled out as a relevant
contributor for aspirin-induced perforation, as most cases were located in
duodenum, and no difference or, perhaps, a slightly greater risk was found
with the coated formulation. A preferential prescription of enteric-coated
aspirin to patients with antecedents of gastrointestinal disorders does not
explain our results, since enteric-coated aspirin users with no such
antecedents present a risk similar to the one associated with plain
aspirin."


Lancet. 1996 Nov 23;348(9039):1413-6.
BACKGROUND: Aspirin products are known to cause irritation and injury to the
gastric mucosa. The belief that enteric-coated and buffered varieties are
less likely to occasion major upper-gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) than
plain aspirin was tested in data from a multicentre case-control study.
METHODS: 550 incident cases of UGIB admitted to hospital with melaena or
haematemesis and confirmed by endoscopy, and 1202 controls identified from
population census lists, were interviewed about use of aspirin and other
non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) during the 7 days before the
onset of bleeding (cases) or interview (controls). Relative risks of UGIB
for each type of aspirin used regularly (at least every other day) were
calculated overall, and according to dose, by multiple logistic regression,
with control for age, sex, marital status, date, education, cigarette
smoking, alcohol use, and use of NSAIDs. FINDINGS: The relative risks of
UGIB for plain, enteric-coated, and buffered aspirin at average daily doses
of 325 mg or less were 2.6, 2.7, and 3.1, respectively. At doses greater
than 325 mg, the relative risk was 5.8 for plain and 7.0 for buffered
aspirin; there were insufficient data to evaluate enteric-coated aspirin at
this dose level. There were no important differences in risk attributable to
the three aspirin forms according to bleeding site (gastric vs duodenal), or
when users of NSAIDs were excluded. INTERPRETATION: Use of low doses of
enteric-coated or buffered aspirin carries a three-fold increase in the risk
of major UGIB. The assumption that these formulations are less harmful than
plain aspirin may be mistaken.
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Guest






PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

sorry about the attribution problem

but RWP stated "aspirin causes GI problems via its systemic effect,,,rather
than simple local irritation,,,so enteric coating isn't going to have a
benefit"

both of these statements are incorrect...

GI problems are a LOCAL,,,not systemic effect

Thus...enteric coating WILL/SHOULD have a protective benefit....

I agree...don't need the higher priced stuff....

also..hubby having surgery this week...surgeon said one week off aspirin
prior was fine...


"Rob" <pettifer@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1111402216.178810.182310@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

Hawki63@sbcglobal.net wrote:
read what you quoted...

"irritation and injury to the gastric mucosa"....means the aspirin
is
exhibiting a LOCAL effect...

prior to surgery...etc...one DOES want to reduce the systemic
effects...ie
on the platelets...

apples and bananas


I agree with your last comment about the systemic effects Hawk.

However, I don't think RWP was answering the OP's question. He was
trying to dissuade one of the latter posters from buying e/c tablets,
at ten times regular aspirin cost, when it has no evidence base for its
use.
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chidi
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 25 Mar 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

is it safe
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Rob
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 06 Jun 2005
Posts: 42

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

Hawki63@sbcglobal.net wrote:
Quote:
read what you quoted...

"irritation and injury to the gastric mucosa"....means the aspirin
is
exhibiting a LOCAL effect...

prior to surgery...etc...one DOES want to reduce the systemic
effects...ie
on the platelets...

apples and bananas


I agree with your last comment about the systemic effects Hawk.

However, I don't think RWP was answering the OP's question. He was
trying to dissuade one of the latter posters from buying e/c tablets,
at ten times regular aspirin cost, when it has no evidence base for its
use.
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

read what you quoted...

"irritation and injury to the gastric mucosa"....means the aspirin is
exhibiting a LOCAL effect...

prior to surgery...etc...one DOES want to reduce the systemic effects...ie
on the platelets...

apples and bananas


"RWP" <dontsendmeanycrap@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:maj%d.789$oE5.85@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
Quote:

They now have special aspiren tablets designed for people that are over
50. For example--Bayer makes a product called "Bayer enteric safety
coated
low strength Aspiren Regiment" I take one pill a day.


But how much of a premium do they attract?

In the UK it is possible to buy 100x75mg Aspirin 75mf for aproximately 1.

Why pay any more than that for a premium produce with negligible, if any,
benefits over the original?

Aspirin causes GI problems via its systemic effect, rather than simply
local irritation. So, enteric-coating isn't going to have a benefit1,2.



Rob

1 Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 Sep;95(9):2218-24.

Risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding associated with use of low-dose
aspirin.

Sorensen HT, Mellemkjaer L, Blot WJ, Nielsen GL, Steffensen FH, McLaughlin
JK, Olsen JH.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University and Aalborg
Hospitals, Denmark.

OBJECTIVE: Aspirin products are known to cause irritation and injury to
the gastric mucosa. We examined the risk of hospitalization for upper
gastrointestinal bleeding with use of low-dose aspirin. METHODS: This was
a cohort study based on record linkage between a population-based
prescription database and a hospital discharge registry in North Jutland
County, Denmark, from January 1, 1991, to December 31, 1995. Incidence
rates of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 27,694 users of low-dose
aspirin were compared with the incidence rates in the general population
in the county. RESULTS: A total of 207 exclusive users of low-dose aspirin
experienced a first episode of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with
admission to the hospital during the study period. The standardized
incidence rate ratio was 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 2.2-2.9), 2.3 in
women and 2.8 in men. The standardized incidence rate ratio for combined
use of low-dose aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was
5.6 (95% confidence interval, 4.4-7.0). The risk was similar among users
of noncoated low-dose aspirin (standardized incidence rate ratio, 2.6; 95%
confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) and coated low-dose aspirin (standardized
incidence rate ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-3.0). CONCLUSIONS:
Use of low-dose aspirin was associated with an increased risk of upper
gastrointestinal bleeding, with still higher risks when combined with
other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Enteric coating did not seem
to reduce the risk. The findings from this observational study raise the
possibility that prophylactic use of low-dose aspirin may convey an
increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, which may offset some of its
benefits.

2 . Which prophylactic aspirin? Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin 1997.Vol35
No.1. (R)
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Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 18

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

In article <jason-2003050919150001@pm1-broad-70.snlo.dialup.fix.net> jason@nospam.com (Jason) writes:
Quote:
Date: Sun, 20 Mar 2005 09:19:15 -0800
From: jason@nospam.com (Jason)
Subject: Re: aspirin and surgery

In article <113r9vutgrrrf09@corp.supernews.com>, "Dee Randall"
deedoveyatshenteldotnet> wrote:

"Repeating Rifle" <salmonegg@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:BE1DBB57.30CC9%salmonegg@sbcglobal.net...
in article e1fgv0thbo6a9is9q3hi826vc5qh2p2bsh@4ax.com, nospam@pacbell.net
at
nospam@pacbell.net wrote on 1/26/05 4:57 PM:

If it doesn't last that long, why the two weeks without aspirin before
surgery?

Malpractice problems?

Bill

When I have my yearly physical which includes taking a stool sample, and
they say not to take aspirin for SEVEN days before I take the sample, I have
been under the impression that aspirin can cause bleeding in the stomach,
or if you have an ulcer it can cause bleeding in the stomach.

Also my physician said that instead of a baby aspirin every day that it is
ok to take a full aspirin every other or third day and that would do just as
well. What I do is take a half-aspirin every day and sometimes skip a day.
Dee

They now have special aspiren tablets designed for people that are over
50. For example--Bayer makes a product called "Bayer enteric safety coated
low strength Aspiren Regiment" I take one pill a day.

--
NEWSGROUP SUBSCRIBERS MOTTO
We respect those subscribers that ask for advice or provide advice.
We do NOT respect the subscribers that enjoy criticizing people.



Actually, Bayer's 81 mg low dose "Asprin Regimen" has been available
for a few years...not to mention Ecotrin also has an enteric coated
low dose 81mg version.
To answer the original question, regarding not taking aspirin for
at least 2 weeks prior to surgery or other invasive technique...
aspirin deactivates platelets permanently from binding to each
other. Platelet binding is one of the first steps in blood clotting.
The "turnover rate" for platelet production is roughly 4 weeks.
By not taking aspirin products for minimum of 2 weeks prior to a
surgical procedure, it allows the platelets to be replaced to a
level that promotes blood clotting, and this prevents the patient
from bleeding to death.
As far as "effective dose" for aspirin's effect on platelets, the
81 mg strength is usually plenty, and can be taken daily.
Alternatively, it is perfectly allright for a patient to take a
regular 325mg ("5 grain") aspririn tablet daily to prevent blood
clotting, as long as some monitoring of the patient's GI tract is
performed to prevent bleeding of the stomach wall, or ulcer
irritation.

C U L8R!
Wiz <{Wink
Wizard57M
Glenn Gilbreath Jr.
Registered Pharmacist
http://members.surfbest.net/wizard57m@surfbest.net/index.htm
-- DOS Internet, Close Windows and Keep the Internet Open! --
Back to top
Jason
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 1119

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

halo2 guy,
Great point. The grocery store where I shop only has the Bayer enteric low
dose aspirins. If they had a generic brand next to it on the shelf--I
would buy it.



In article <FIWdnUBh04JtXqDfRVn-2Q@comcast.com>, "halo2 guy"
<somewhereovethe@rainbow.com> wrote:

Quote:
There is no logical reason to purchase an expensive name brand item such as
aspirin that has been around forever and costs just a few cents a bottle to
make. Purchase a generic.

Bayer has a brilliant marketing department as does Tylenol.

Aspirin is aspirin and it doesn't know if it is in a 6 year old or a 50
year old. There are generics all over that have enteric coated aspirin even
the 81 mg 1/4 strength baby aspirin.



"RWP" <dontsendmeanycrap@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:maj%d.789$oE5.85@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...

They now have special aspiren tablets designed for people that are over
50. For example--Bayer makes a product called "Bayer enteric safety
coated
low strength Aspiren Regiment" I take one pill a day.


But how much of a premium do they attract?

In the UK it is possible to buy 100x75mg Aspirin 75mf for aproximately 1.

Why pay any more than that for a premium produce with negligible, if any,
benefits over the original?

Aspirin causes GI problems via its systemic effect, rather than simply
local irritation. So, enteric-coating isn't going to have a benefit1,2.



Rob

1 Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 Sep;95(9):2218-24.

Risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding associated with use of low-dose
aspirin.

Sorensen HT, Mellemkjaer L, Blot WJ, Nielsen GL, Steffensen FH, McLaughlin
JK, Olsen JH.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University and Aalborg
Hospitals, Denmark.

OBJECTIVE: Aspirin products are known to cause irritation and injury to
the gastric mucosa. We examined the risk of hospitalization for upper
gastrointestinal bleeding with use of low-dose aspirin. METHODS: This was
a cohort study based on record linkage between a population-based
prescription database and a hospital discharge registry in North Jutland
County, Denmark, from January 1, 1991, to December 31, 1995. Incidence
rates of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 27,694 users of low-dose
aspirin were compared with the incidence rates in the general population
in the county. RESULTS: A total of 207 exclusive users of low-dose aspirin
experienced a first episode of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with
admission to the hospital during the study period. The standardized
incidence rate ratio was 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 2.2-2.9), 2.3 in
women and 2.8 in men. The standardized incidence rate ratio for combined
use of low-dose aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was
5.6 (95% confidence interval, 4.4-7.0). The risk was similar among users
of noncoated low-dose aspirin (standardized incidence rate ratio, 2.6; 95%
confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) and coated low-dose aspirin (standardized
incidence rate ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-3.0). CONCLUSIONS:
Use of low-dose aspirin was associated with an increased risk of upper
gastrointestinal bleeding, with still higher risks when combined with
other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Enteric coating did not seem
to reduce the risk. The findings from this observational study raise the
possibility that prophylactic use of low-dose aspirin may convey an
increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, which may offset some of its
benefits.

2 . Which prophylactic aspirin? Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin 1997.Vol35
No.1. (R)


--
NEWSGROUP SUBSCRIBERS MOTTO
We respect those subscribers that ask for advice or provide advice.
We do NOT respect the subscribers that enjoy criticizing people.
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halo2 guy
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 46

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

There is no logical reason to purchase an expensive name brand item such as
aspirin that has been around forever and costs just a few cents a bottle to
make. Purchase a generic.

Bayer has a brilliant marketing department as does Tylenol.

Aspirin is aspirin and it doesn't know if it is in a 6 year old or a 50
year old. There are generics all over that have enteric coated aspirin even
the 81 mg 1/4 strength baby aspirin.



"RWP" <dontsendmeanycrap@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:maj%d.789$oE5.85@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
Quote:

They now have special aspiren tablets designed for people that are over
50. For example--Bayer makes a product called "Bayer enteric safety
coated
low strength Aspiren Regiment" I take one pill a day.


But how much of a premium do they attract?

In the UK it is possible to buy 100x75mg Aspirin 75mf for aproximately 1.

Why pay any more than that for a premium produce with negligible, if any,
benefits over the original?

Aspirin causes GI problems via its systemic effect, rather than simply
local irritation. So, enteric-coating isn't going to have a benefit1,2.



Rob

1 Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 Sep;95(9):2218-24.

Risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding associated with use of low-dose
aspirin.

Sorensen HT, Mellemkjaer L, Blot WJ, Nielsen GL, Steffensen FH, McLaughlin
JK, Olsen JH.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University and Aalborg
Hospitals, Denmark.

OBJECTIVE: Aspirin products are known to cause irritation and injury to
the gastric mucosa. We examined the risk of hospitalization for upper
gastrointestinal bleeding with use of low-dose aspirin. METHODS: This was
a cohort study based on record linkage between a population-based
prescription database and a hospital discharge registry in North Jutland
County, Denmark, from January 1, 1991, to December 31, 1995. Incidence
rates of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 27,694 users of low-dose
aspirin were compared with the incidence rates in the general population
in the county. RESULTS: A total of 207 exclusive users of low-dose aspirin
experienced a first episode of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with
admission to the hospital during the study period. The standardized
incidence rate ratio was 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 2.2-2.9), 2.3 in
women and 2.8 in men. The standardized incidence rate ratio for combined
use of low-dose aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was
5.6 (95% confidence interval, 4.4-7.0). The risk was similar among users
of noncoated low-dose aspirin (standardized incidence rate ratio, 2.6; 95%
confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) and coated low-dose aspirin (standardized
incidence rate ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-3.0). CONCLUSIONS:
Use of low-dose aspirin was associated with an increased risk of upper
gastrointestinal bleeding, with still higher risks when combined with
other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Enteric coating did not seem
to reduce the risk. The findings from this observational study raise the
possibility that prophylactic use of low-dose aspirin may convey an
increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, which may offset some of its
benefits.

2 . Which prophylactic aspirin? Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin 1997.Vol35
No.1. (R)
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RWP
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 09 May 2005
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

Quote:
They now have special aspiren tablets designed for people that are over
50. For example--Bayer makes a product called "Bayer enteric safety coated
low strength Aspiren Regiment" I take one pill a day.


But how much of a premium do they attract?

In the UK it is possible to buy 100x75mg Aspirin 75mf for aproximately 1.

Why pay any more than that for a premium produce with negligible, if any,
benefits over the original?

Aspirin causes GI problems via its systemic effect, rather than simply local
irritation. So, enteric-coating isn't going to have a benefit1,2.



Rob

1 Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 Sep;95(9):2218-24.

Risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding associated with use of low-dose
aspirin.

Sorensen HT, Mellemkjaer L, Blot WJ, Nielsen GL, Steffensen FH, McLaughlin
JK, Olsen JH.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University and Aalborg
Hospitals, Denmark.

OBJECTIVE: Aspirin products are known to cause irritation and injury to the
gastric mucosa. We examined the risk of hospitalization for upper
gastrointestinal bleeding with use of low-dose aspirin. METHODS: This was a
cohort study based on record linkage between a population-based prescription
database and a hospital discharge registry in North Jutland County, Denmark,
from January 1, 1991, to December 31, 1995. Incidence rates of upper
gastrointestinal bleeding in 27,694 users of low-dose aspirin were compared
with the incidence rates in the general population in the county. RESULTS: A
total of 207 exclusive users of low-dose aspirin experienced a first episode
of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with admission to the hospital during the
study period. The standardized incidence rate ratio was 2.6 (95% confidence
interval, 2.2-2.9), 2.3 in women and 2.8 in men. The standardized incidence
rate ratio for combined use of low-dose aspirin and other nonsteroidal
anti-inflammatory drugs was 5.6 (95% confidence interval, 4.4-7.0). The risk
was similar among users of noncoated low-dose aspirin (standardized
incidence rate ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) and coated
low-dose aspirin (standardized incidence rate ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence
interval, 2.2-3.0). CONCLUSIONS: Use of low-dose aspirin was associated with
an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, with still higher
risks when combined with other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Enteric
coating did not seem to reduce the risk. The findings from this
observational study raise the possibility that prophylactic use of low-dose
aspirin may convey an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, which may
offset some of its benefits.

2 . Which prophylactic aspirin? Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin 1997.Vol35
No.1. (R)
Back to top
Jason
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 1119

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: aspirin and surgery Reply with quote

In article <113r9vutgrrrf09@corp.supernews.com>, "Dee Randall"
<deedoveyatshenteldotnet> wrote:

Quote:
"Repeating Rifle" <salmonegg@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:BE1DBB57.30CC9%salmonegg@sbcglobal.net...
in article e1fgv0thbo6a9is9q3hi826vc5qh2p2bsh@4ax.com, nospam@pacbell.net
at
nospam@pacbell.net wrote on 1/26/05 4:57 PM:

If it doesn't last that long, why the two weeks without aspirin before
surgery?

Malpractice problems?

Bill

When I have my yearly physical which includes taking a stool sample, and
they say not to take aspirin for SEVEN days before I take the sample, I have
been under the impression that aspirin can cause bleeding in the stomach,
or if you have an ulcer it can cause bleeding in the stomach.

Also my physician said that instead of a baby aspirin every day that it is
ok to take a full aspirin every other or third day and that would do just as
well. What I do is take a half-aspirin every day and sometimes skip a day.
Dee

They now have special aspiren tablets designed for people that are over
50. For example--Bayer makes a product called "Bayer enteric safety coated
low strength Aspiren Regiment" I take one pill a day.

--
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Dr. Wayne Simon
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 111

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: zyprexa cold turkey withdrawal Reply with quote

"Sandra G" <gruskysca@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1107215609.760763.241860@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
Can someone help me? I went off zyprexa cold turkey after only 10 days
and had withdrawal. It has been a month since they symptoms started,
and I still have them. I even went back on a lower dose, but it didn't
help. Mainly, I feel agitated, anxious, have some cognitive distortion
where I just don't feel normal, not like myself at all. I also have
song snippets stuck in my head constantly. Sometimes I can be
distracted from them, but they always come back. I've never had
anything like this before and find it very disturbing.

thanks.
have you tried downloading the song snippets, perhaps into writing onto
paper. I heard John Lennon often wrote is songs f rom hearing snippets.
"Imagine all the people"
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Paul Trusten
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 22 Jun 2005
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:28 am    Post subject: Re: third-party payments for "pharmacy care OTC" drugs? Reply with quote

Didn't that also go by state at one time? Maybe nowadays the claim is
rejected for any product not labeled "Rx Only," no matter what its legal
status in that state.

"P T" <Petepenguin@webtv.net> wrote in message
news:23723-41FDC387-180@storefull-3131.bay.webtv.net...
Quote:
Or would it give pbms an excuse to reject claims for similar legend
drugs?
I'm thinking about Robitussin w/ Cod where you sometimes get the
convenient rejection: "OTCs not covered."
:-\
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