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Matrix metalloproteinase-9 / chlorogenic acid / iron chelation
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ironjustice@aol.com
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Joined: 28 Apr 2005
Posts: 1522

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 11:01 pm    Post subject: Re: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 / chlorogenic acid / iron chelation Reply with quote

ironjustice@aol.com wrote:

Cancer Lett. 2005 Feb 10;218(2):153-62. Related Articles, Links

Inhibition of Caco-2 colon, MCF-7 and Hs578T breast, and DU 145
prostatic cancer cell proliferation by water-soluble black bean
condensed tannins.


Bawadi HA, Bansode RR, Trappey A 2nd, Truax RE, Losso JN.


Food Protein Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Human Ecology,
Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, 111 Food Science
Building, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.


The potential anti-angiogenic activities of water-soluble condensed
tannins isolated from black beans were evaluated using HEL 299 normal
human fibroblast lung cells, Caco-2 colon, MCF-7 and Hs578T breast, and

DU 145 human prostatic cancer cells. Condensed tannins at 0.24-24muM
did not affect the growth of normal cells, but dose-dependently induced

cancer cell death by apoptosis as shown by a concentration-dependent
decrease in ATP and cell gross morphology. After 24h exposure to
Caco-2, MCF-7, Hs578T, and DU 145 cancer cells, water-soluble black
bean condensed tannins at 24muM suppressed fetal bovine serum
stimulated cell migration, the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2
(MMP-2 or gelatinase A), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 or
gelatinase B), and vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF(165)
receptor expression by the cancer cells in the conditioned media. The
potential health enhancing properties of condensed tannins from black
beans as inhibitors of angiogenesis is discussed.


PMID: 15670892 [PubMed - in process]


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


http://ift.confex.com/ift/2003/techprogram/paper_20398.htm


76B-2
A proteomics approach to the study of phytic acid inhibitory activity
against
angiogenesis
R. R. BANSODE, M. Ogawa, and J. N. Losso. Dept. of Food Science,
Louisiana
State Univ. Agricultural Center, 111 Food Science Bldg., Baton Rouge,
LA
70803-4200


Angiogenesis-the formation of new blood vessels from a quiescent
endothelium-
has been identified and recognized by various multiple disciplinary
studies as
a safe target for the prevention of the onset and/or complications of
several
degenerative diseases because angiogenesis is an oncofetal mechanism
that is
mostly down regulated in healthy individuals. Vascular endothelial
growth
factor (VEGF), acidic or basic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF, bFGF),
and
metalloproteinases are key mediators of angiogenesis. The rationale of
designing anti-angiogenic functional foods is that they are safe,
effective,
reversible inhibitors, and can be moderately ingested over a life span
without
severe toxicity. Phytic acid is present in rice bran and has gained
considerable attention in functional foods research as a compound that
could
reduce the risk of several neoplastic diseases because of it inhibits
enzymes
associated with the degradation of the basement membrane that leads to
metastasis and eventual painful death. We have previously demonstrated
the in
vitro inhibitory activity of phytic against metalloproteinase-2 and -9
(MMP-2
and MMP-9). Phytic inhibits angiogenic factor tyrosine kinase receptor.

The
objective of this research was to demonstrate the in vivo inhibitory
activity
of phytic against angiogenesis. Trypsinized human umbilical endothelial

cells
(HUVEC) were treated with various concentrations of phytic, incubated
overnight
at 37oC in a 5% CO2 humidified atmosphere and observed for tube
formation. In
vivo angiogenesis was performed by incubating various concentrations of

phytic
with fertilized egg yolks using the CAM assay. Phytic acid (100 nM)
completely
inhibited tube formation by HUVEC. Phytic acid (100 nM) inhibited the
formation
of new blood vessels in the growing chicken embryo. These data and
previous in
vitro results from our laboratory, and epidemiological studies
demonstrate that
phytic acid at moderate concentration may be considered as functional
foods for
the various forms of degenerative diseases of the gastrointestinal
tract.


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ironjustice@aol.com
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 28 Apr 2005
Posts: 1522

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 10:41 pm    Post subject: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 / chlorogenic acid / iron chelation Reply with quote

Cerebrospinal fluid and serum levels and intrathecal production of
active
matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) as markers of disease activity in
patients with multiple sclerosis.
Fainardi E, Castellazzi M, Bellini T, Manfrinato MC, Baldi E, Casetta
I,
Paolino E, Granieri E, Dallocchio F
Mult Scler. 2006 Jun ; 12(3): 294-301

In this study, we employed a sensitive activity assay system to measure

cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum levels of active matrix
metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in 37 relapsing-remitting (RR), 15
secondary
progressive (SP) and nine primary progressive (PP) multiple sclerosis
(MS)
patients, grouped according to clinical and magnetic resonance imaging
(MRI)
evidence of disease activity. We also studied, as neurological
controls, 48
patients with other inflammatory neurological disorders (OIND) and 48
with
non-inflammatory neurological disorders (NIND). To assess active
MMP-9/TIMP-1 circuit, CSF and serum levels of MMP-9 tissue inhibitor
TIMP-1
were quantified by ELISA in the same patient population. CSF mean
levels of
active MMP-9, CSF active MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios and intrathecal active
MMP-9
synthesis, as indicated by specific index, were more elevated in MS
than in
NIND (P < 0.05, < 0.02 and < 0.02, respectively), serum active
MMP-9/TIMP-1
ratio was higher in MS (P < 0.01) and OIND (P < 0.02) than in NIND, and

serum TIMP-1 concentrations were lower in MS than in NIND (P<0.05).
More
importantly, serum active MMP-9 mean levels, serum active MMP-9/TIMP-1
ratio
and intrathecal production of active MMP-9 were increased in MS
patients
with clinical (P < 0.001, < 0.001 and < 0.05, respectively) and MRI (P
<
0.001, < 0.001 and < 0.02, respectively) disease activity, whereas CSF
mean
concentrations of active MMP-9 and CSF active MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio were
enhanced only in MS patients with MRI evidence of disease activity (P <
0.02
and < 0.01, respectively). Altogether, these findings suggest that a
shift
in MMP-9/TIMP-1 balance towards proteolytic activity of MMP-9 could be
relevant in MS immune dysregulation. In addition, our results indicate
that
CSF and serum levels of active MMP-9 may represent a potential
surrogate
biomarker for monitoring MS disease activity. In particular, serum
active
MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio seems to be a very appropriate indicator of ongoing
MS
inflammation, since it is easily measurable.

_________________________________________________________________

Life Sci. 2005 Oct 14;77(22):2760-9. Related Articles, Links


A phenolic compound, 5-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid), is a new
type
and strong matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitor: isolation and
identification from methanol extract of Euonymus alatus.

Jin UH, Lee JY, Kang SK, Kim JK, Park WH, Kim JG, Moon SK, Kim CH.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dongguk University
College
of Oriental Medicine and National Research Laboratory for Glycobiology,

Kyungju, Kyungbuk 780-714, Republic of Korea.

A phenolic compound responsible for anti-MMP-9, which is known to be
involved in tumor cell invasion and metastasis, has been isolated from
methanol extracts prepared from stem barks of Euonymus alatus by
assay-guided fractionation. The compound has been identified as
5-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid; CHA) by NMR and FAB-MS. CHA
showed
a strong inhibitory effect of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity
in a
concentration-dependent manner on zymography. The purified CHA
inhibited
MMP-9 activity with the IC50 of 30-50 nM. Furthermore, the cytotoxic
survival curve showed that CHA does not have cytotoxic effects on
cellular
proliferation, when Hep3B cells were treated with various
concentrations of
CHA and cell viability was measured using the XTT assay. The present
data
suggest a clue for possible mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by CHA
and
other naturally occurring phenolic compounds. The results also imply
that
useful cancer chemopreventive agents can be further identified by
combinations of in vitro (as a first screen) and in vivo studies.

PMID: 16005473 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Iron Chelation by Chlorogenic Acid as a Natural Antioxidant


Yasuhisa KONO1), Sakiko KASHINE1), Takushi YONEYAMA1), Yuji SAKAMOTO1),
Yoshihisa MATSUI1) and Hitoshi SHIBATA1)


1) Department of Life Science and Biotechnology Faculty of Life and
Environmental Science Shimane University


(Received April 28, 1997)


Chlorogenic acid, a dietary antioxidant, effectively inhibited the
iron-induced lipid peroxidation of bovine liver microsomes in a
concentration-dependent manner. In the Fenton-type reaction,
chlorogenic acid inhibited the production of the hydroxyl radical by
iron-EDTA or iron-ADP, while iron plus chlorogenic acid did not
generate the hydroxyl radical. The formation of an iron complex with
chlorogenic acid was demonstrated by UV/vis absorbance spectroscopic,
ESR and 1H-NMR studies. The ferric complex with chlorogenic acid was in
the ferric high-spin state near rhombicity, and had no radical
scavenging activity. The results indicate that chlorogenic acid
prevented the formation of the hydroxyl radical by forming a chelate
with iron whose complex cannot catalyze the Fenton-type reaction.


Key words: antioxidant; free radical; chelation; chlorogenic acid; iron

_________________________________________________________________



Who loves ya.
Tom


Jesus Was A Vegetarian!
http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com


Man Is A Herbivore!
http://tinyurl.com/a3cc3


DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
http://tinyurl.com/zk9fk
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