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The Great "Mediterranean Diet" Fraud.
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TC
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 1814

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: The mystery of crohns and UC is no mystery at all Reply with quote

It ain't so mysterious and it ain't so esoteric.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0969276818/qid=1107359473/sr=2-3/ref=pd_ka_b_2_3/104-3247577-9552708

Breaking the Vicious Cycle: Intestinal Health Through Diet
by Elaine Gloria Gottschall


It's grains. Read the reviews on the webpage. Just follow the Specific
Carbohydrate Diet.

TC


Advocate147 wrote:
Quote:
Every now and then the subject of crohns comes up on the nutrition
newsgroup.
This is inform everyone that has or is in some way connected to
crohns.
Crohns is not the mysterious nor cause unknown illness as it is
touted to be.
It just has such a weird cause that makes it difficult or almost
impossible to
accept. Accept it or not, it is factual. Maybe not scientific as
it is
known, but factual nevertheless, as anyone with crohns or UC can
easily
determine by following the procedure that will unlock the mystery.
The website http://ascc.healingwell.com/info/gailfaq.htm is a
layman's
theory of the cause of crohns. Manmade illness, Continuing to
grow and
most people will either have it or know someone that does. Because
the cause
involves stimulants taken by one person and passed on to another by
mind/body
connection, literally in the form of crohns or UC. Anti-depressants
being the
most often cause along with all other stimulants, meds or
recreational drugs.
And adding to the complexity is the fact that the two or more persons
do not
need to be in one's presence for the person with crohns to be ill
with
symptoms.
Distance is no factor, only the mind connection is there causing the
damage.
Pediatric children suffer also, usually because their mother is on an
anti-depressant and ceasing the anti-depressant would bring the child
immediately back to normal.
The oddity of the cause keeps the cause a secret and easy or
difficult to
pursue/
It takes a little effort, but effort worthwhile.
Add to the drugs in the website others such as Xanax, Buspar,
Depakote,
Flexeril, natural herbs with natural stimulants, kava kava, st johns
wort, etc.
etc. etc. adding to the mixture of harmful meds causing crohns to a
vulnerable
person.
If one has unexplained symptoms such as vague or very pronounced
feelings or
unexplained symptoms, it is time to think of crohns and rule that
out.
Doctors do not know the cause, cannot always diagnose it, but
treatment by a
doctor is necessary when symptoms are present.
This is for everyone to take note of, as the symptoms are sometimes
thought to
be imaginary, but that is a very false perception.
Hope this helps.

Gail Michael
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Guest






PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: The "mental illness" scam ! Reply with quote

Is the gi tract a standalone system, disconnected from the rest of the
organ systems in the body? Or rather is it one piece of the whole?
Does it not have close ties to the neurological and circulatory
systems? It seems to me that malabsorption related to parasites,
bacteria, fungi in the gut could put toxic byproducts into circulation
and prevent essential nutrients from getting to the blood stream and
then to their intended organ systems. If I recall correctly, nutrients
are fairly important to all of the body's processes, and chemicals have
direct impacts on the function of the neurological system.

Does it still appear outlandish to attribute many and varied symptoms
in "unrelated" organs of the body to dysfunctions in the gut?
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NYC XYZ
medicine forum addict


Joined: 28 Apr 2005
Posts: 91

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Protein / Fats/ Carbs relative to bodyweight Reply with quote

Thanks -- I figured it was a bunch of work, and was only wondering if
there are any general principles (which you've helpfully outlined).

It's weird...I'm not eating anywhere near 230g of protein a day, but
I'm now benching 225@2X after a month in the gym...this is what I don't
get...sounds like I'm capable of much more, if only I'd feed myself!

How many oz. of steak/chicken/salmon makes for 230g?? I'm really
curious now if I can grow these muscles (notieceably) more without
supplements.


And thanks for the link!!
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Steve Freides
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 14 May 2005
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Protein / Fats/ Carbs relative to bodyweight Reply with quote

"NYC XYZ" <jack_foreigner@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1107365383.015264.191870@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

Thanks -- I figured it was a bunch of work, and was only wondering if
there are any general principles (which you've helpfully outlined).

It's weird...I'm not eating anywhere near 230g of protein a day, but
I'm now benching 225@2X after a month in the gym...this is what I
don't
get...sounds like I'm capable of much more, if only I'd feed myself!

For what you're trying to do, which is mostly lose weight, you don't
need anywhere 230 grams of protein. The actual target ought to be based
on lean body mass, not total bodyweight. I'd say 100 grams of protein
is probably enough for now, maybe 150 if you're really trying to pack on
the muscle at some point down the road, but that shouldn't be your first
focus now, losing weight should, in my opinion.

And, with all due respect, bodyweight for two reps in the bench press
isn't surprising. My experience is that bodyweight is pretty easy to
achieve but it starts to get harder fairly soon after that. Given that
you're pretty strong and muscular already from the sound of things, I
imagine your bench will keep going up, but I strongly suggest you focus
on the deadlift or squat, not the bench press, as your main lift.
American seem obsessed with the bench press for reasons beyond my
understanding.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


Quote:
How many oz. of steak/chicken/salmon makes for 230g?? I'm really
curious now if I can grow these muscles (notieceably) more without
supplements.


And thanks for the link!!
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rick++
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Protein / Fats/ Carbs relative to bodyweight Reply with quote

The body is pretty smart at figuring this out.
Just cut all highly refined/junk foods.
If you start devloping a craving for something,
like fruit or meat, then increase that proportion.
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Dan Cosley
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Protein / Fats/ Carbs relative to bodyweight Reply with quote

In article <1107365383.015264.191870@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>, NYC XYZ wrote:
Quote:

How many oz. of steak/chicken/salmon makes for 230g?? I'm really
curious now if I can grow these muscles (notieceably) more without
supplements.

http://www.fitday.com/ will help you answer these questions.

-- Dan

--
Dan Cosley (cosley@Never.Spam.cs.umn.edu * http://www.cs.umn.edu/~cosley/)
GroupLens Research Lab, Univ of MN (http://movielens.umn.edu/ * 612.624.8372)
*** Just a foot soldier in the Army of Truth ***
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Ignoramus23553
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Protein / Fats/ Carbs relative to bodyweight Reply with quote

On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 13:15:25 -0500, Steve Freides <steve@fridayscomputer.com> wrote:

.... good thoughts on overestimating protein needs skipped ..

Quote:
And, with all due respect, bodyweight for two reps in the bench press
isn't surprising. My experience is that bodyweight is pretty easy to
achieve but it starts to get harder fairly soon after that. Given that
you're pretty strong and muscular already from the sound of things, I
imagine your bench will keep going up, but I strongly suggest you focus
on the deadlift or squat, not the bench press, as your main lift.
American seem obsessed with the bench press for reasons beyond my
understanding.

I am curious about something. I would like to estimate how much I can
bench press. The trouble is that I do not go to a gym.

My thinking was, place a board on an analog scale, put some weight on
the back (like a 3.5 year old kid) and do a slow pushup. Whatever the
scale shows, would be an approximation of a bench press. Does it make
sense?

Another question. What constitutes a "respectable" deadlift, in
relation to body weight?

thanks

i
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John
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 22 Jul 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Protein / Fats/ Carbs relative to bodyweight Reply with quote

"Ignoramus23553" <ignoramus23553@NOSPAM.23553.invalid> wrote in message
news:ctr738$p0p$0@pita.alt.net...
Quote:
On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 13:15:25 -0500, Steve Freides
steve@fridayscomputer.com> wrote:

... good thoughts on overestimating protein needs skipped ..

And, with all due respect, bodyweight for two reps in the bench press
isn't surprising. My experience is that bodyweight is pretty easy to
achieve but it starts to get harder fairly soon after that. Given that
you're pretty strong and muscular already from the sound of things, I
imagine your bench will keep going up, but I strongly suggest you focus
on the deadlift or squat, not the bench press, as your main lift.
American seem obsessed with the bench press for reasons beyond my
understanding.

I am curious about something. I would like to estimate how much I can
bench press. The trouble is that I do not go to a gym.

Go to the gym.
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Steve Freides
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 14 May 2005
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Protein / Fats/ Carbs relative to bodyweight Reply with quote

"Ignoramus23553" <ignoramus23553@NOSPAM.23553.invalid> wrote in message
news:ctr738$p0p$0@pita.alt.net...
Quote:
On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 13:15:25 -0500, Steve Freides
steve@fridayscomputer.com> wrote:

... good thoughts on overestimating protein needs skipped ..

And, with all due respect, bodyweight for two reps in the bench press
isn't surprising. My experience is that bodyweight is pretty easy
to
achieve but it starts to get harder fairly soon after that. Given
that
you're pretty strong and muscular already from the sound of things, I
imagine your bench will keep going up, but I strongly suggest you
focus
on the deadlift or squat, not the bench press, as your main lift.
American seem obsessed with the bench press for reasons beyond my
understanding.

I am curious about something. I would like to estimate how much I can
bench press. The trouble is that I do not go to a gym.

My thinking was, place a board on an analog scale, put some weight on
the back (like a 3.5 year old kid) and do a slow pushup. Whatever the
scale shows, would be an approximation of a bench press. Does it make
sense?

I recall someone saying when you do a pushup, it's about 70% of your
bodyweight on your hands, but the movements are different enough that I
don't think you can count on any one particular relationship. Offhand,
because of the stabilizing required, I'd say bench pressing 70% of one's
bodyweight is harder than doing a pushup.

I'd get a power rack for home or perhaps do a barbell floor press and
have some spotters around just in case things get weird. Power racks
can be had for pretty cheap, and you can always rig up a couple of
sturdy saw horses if you don't want to bother with the rack.

Or be like me and just don't give a s$%^ about how much you can bench
press. If you want a more interesting challenge, IMHO, do handstand
pushups supported by a wall - it's a pretty decent test of overhead
pressing strength, again not the same as anything else except a support
handstand press, but I guesstimate that if you can lower your head all
the way to the floor and press back up again, you're probably good for a
bodyweight barbell military press or maybe a little more.

Quote:
Another question. What constitutes a "respectable" deadlift, in
relation to body weight?

Bryce Lane has a chart somewhere - OK, here it is:

http://home.comcast.net/~joandbryce/hwgdami.htm

From that page: Lift = Deadlift

Nutin' to be ashamed of - 1.5 x bodyweight

Fit Guy - 2.0 x bodyweight

Animal - 2.75 x bodyweight

Holy S**t!! - 3.5 x bodyweight


Me, I hit "Fit Guy" a while back and am trying to get to "Animal"
sometime in the next year or so, all with no gear. Bryce talks about
belt or not for a few of the lifts but doesn't mention the DL. I've
taught at least one guy who was your typical not-a-lifter kind of guy -
tall, skinny, used to ride bikes for distance, never lifted a weight in
his life - I got him up to 1.5 x bodyweight pretty quickly. I think 1.5
x bodyweight is one of those "any healthy adult male under 220 lbs. or
so can learn to do this in six months and be proud of it" kind of
numbers.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com

Quote:
thanks

i
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Ignoramus23553
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Protein / Fats/ Carbs relative to bodyweight Reply with quote

On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 14:31:44 -0500, Steve Freides <steve@fridayscomputer.com> wrote:
Quote:
"Ignoramus23553" <ignoramus23553@NOSPAM.23553.invalid> wrote in message
news:ctr738$p0p$0@pita.alt.net...
On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 13:15:25 -0500, Steve Freides
steve@fridayscomputer.com> wrote:

... good thoughts on overestimating protein needs skipped ..

And, with all due respect, bodyweight for two reps in the bench press
isn't surprising. My experience is that bodyweight is pretty easy
to
achieve but it starts to get harder fairly soon after that. Given
that
you're pretty strong and muscular already from the sound of things, I
imagine your bench will keep going up, but I strongly suggest you
focus
on the deadlift or squat, not the bench press, as your main lift.
American seem obsessed with the bench press for reasons beyond my
understanding.

I am curious about something. I would like to estimate how much I can
bench press. The trouble is that I do not go to a gym.

My thinking was, place a board on an analog scale, put some weight on
the back (like a 3.5 year old kid) and do a slow pushup. Whatever the
scale shows, would be an approximation of a bench press. Does it make
sense?

I recall someone saying when you do a pushup, it's about 70% of your
bodyweight on your hands, but the movements are different enough that I
don't think you can count on any one particular relationship. Offhand,
because of the stabilizing required, I'd say bench pressing 70% of one's
bodyweight is harder than doing a pushup.

If I can clarify, you are saying that because a pushup involves a
movement substantially different from bench press, the force of the arms
on the floor/scale during a pushup is not indicative of possible
bench press performance.

Quote:
I'd get a power rack for home or perhaps do a barbell floor press and
have some spotters around just in case things get weird. Power racks
can be had for pretty cheap, and you can always rig up a couple of
sturdy saw horses if you don't want to bother with the rack.

I am indeed thinking of doing something along these lines.

Quote:
Or be like me and just don't give a s$%^ about how much you can bench
press. If you want a more interesting challenge, IMHO, do handstand
pushups supported by a wall - it's a pretty decent test of overhead
pressing strength, again not the same as anything else except a support
handstand press, but I guesstimate that if you can lower your head all
the way to the floor and press back up again, you're probably good for a
bodyweight barbell military press or maybe a little more.

Another question. What constitutes a "respectable" deadlift, in
relation to body weight?

Bryce Lane has a chart somewhere - OK, here it is:

http://home.comcast.net/~joandbryce/hwgdami.htm

From that page: Lift = Deadlift

Nutin' to be ashamed of - 1.5 x bodyweight

Fit Guy - 2.0 x bodyweight

Animal - 2.75 x bodyweight

Holy S**t!! - 3.5 x bodyweight


Thanks, great info!

Quote:
Me, I hit "Fit Guy" a while back and am trying to get to "Animal"

awesome

Quote:
sometime in the next year or so, all with no gear.

Well, you probably do have a barbell. :)

Quote:
Bryce talks about belt or not for a few of the lifts but doesn't
mention the DL. I've taught at least one guy who was your typical
not-a-lifter kind of guy - tall, skinny, used to ride bikes for
distance, never lifted a weight in his life - I got him up to 1.5 x
bodyweight pretty quickly. I think 1.5 x bodyweight is one of those
"any healthy adult male under 220 lbs. or so can learn to do this in
six months and be proud of it" kind of numbers.

Got it, thanks.

--
223/173.1/180
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Ignoramus23553
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Protein / Fats/ Carbs relative to bodyweight Reply with quote

On 2 Feb 2005 20:07:53 GMT, Ignoramus23553 <ignoramus23553@NOSPAM.23553.invalid> wrote:
Quote:
Bryce Lane has a chart somewhere - OK, here it is:

http://home.comcast.net/~joandbryce/hwgdami.htm

thanks again... looks like I am a "nutin' to be ashamed of" in most
categories, and animal in chinups (if my palms facing outward pullups
would count)

i
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Roger Rabbit
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 280

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Have You Heard The Good News? Reply with quote

On 29 Jan 2005 20:49:27 -0800, "Mr-Natural-Health"
<johngohde@naturalhealthperspective.com> wrote:

Quote:

Why are religious people so blatantly obnoxious?

I hear you.

Quote:

Why of all the religious people are Christians / Jesus-Freaks the most
obnoxious group?


That's an easy one ... they can't help it. Its inherent in
Christianity to go out and make a bloody pest of yourself by pushing
your delusion on everyone that has a different belief.

Quote:
And, why are religious Jesus-Freaks so obviously mentally ill?

Major omega-3 deficiency I would say, but who really knows?

Quote:
.
God truly acts in mysterious ways. Sad

I feel your pain.

rr
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Roger Rabbit
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 280

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Veggie Diet May Lower High Blood Pressure Reply with quote

Perhaps Dr. Barnard can explain why it is that the largely vegetarian
population of southern India has a much shorter lifespan compared to
the Indians in the north where meat is consumed. The PCRM is a
vegetarian front that have their own agenda, not your health, at the
top of their priority.

rr

On 31 Jan 2005 16:03:46 -0800, "Roman Bystrianyk"
<rbystrianyk@gmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
http://www.healthsentinel.com/news.php?id=582&title=Veggie+Diet+May+Lower+High+Blood+Pressure&event=news_print_list_item

Karen Pallarito, "Veggie Diet May Lower High Blood Pressure", ABC News,
January 21, 2005,
Link:
http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/01/21/hscout523461.html

Vegetarians tend to have lower blood pressure than the general
population, but it hasn't been clear whether their diet or their
lifestyle guards them against hypertension.

Now, a new review of previously published studies claims that diet
provides the protection.

"It's the diet itself, and it is clearly the diet of choice for people
who want to get their blood pressure under control," said Dr. Neal D.
Barnard, president and founder of the Physicians Committee for
Responsible Medicine and co-author of the report, which appears in the
January issue of Nutrition Reviews.

Barnard, a nutritionist and author of the book Breaking the Food
Seduction: The Hidden Reasons Behind Food Cravings and Seven Steps to
End Them Naturally, concluded that a person who suffers from
hypertension and has yet to switch to a vegetarian diet is "really
trying to fight their condition with one arm tied behind their back."

About 65 million American adults have high blood pressure, according to
the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Hypertension is often
called the "silent killer" because it usually has no symptoms but leads
to increased risk for heart disease, congestive heart failure, stroke
and kidney failure.

Barnard and committee nutritionist Susan Berkow analyzed 80 scientific
studies, including observational studies of individuals on vegetarian
diets compared with non-vegetarians and randomized, controlled trials
in which outcomes of people who switch to a plant-based diet were
compared with control subjects.

"The purpose of our review was to bring together what is known about
the effect of the diet, but also what we know about the mechanism and
try to explain why this occurs," Barnard explained.

Some of the best observational data, according to the report, come from
studies involving Seventh-Day Adventists, who advocate an alcohol-free,
tobacco-free, vegetarian lifestyle. About 50 percent of Adventists
follow a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, which includes dairy products and
eggs, the authors noted.

One study involving California Adventists found that vegetarians have
about half the prevalence of hypertension compared to non-vegetarian
Adventists. When hypertensives were defined as those taking medication
intended to reduce their blood pressure, a nearly threefold difference
in the prevalence of hypertension was seen between the groups.

Overall, the randomized controlled trials included in the review found
that blood pressure is lowered when animal products were replaced with
vegetable products in both people with normal blood pressure and those
who are hypertensive.

To understand the blood-pressure-lowering effects of a plant-based
diet, the authors examined changes in body weight and intake of
specific food groups and nutrients.

Studies show that vegetarians tend to be slimmer, on average, which may
help explain their lower incidence of hypertension. A vegetarian diet
also is significantly lower in saturated fat, reducing the viscosity,
or thickness, of the blood.

Blood becomes "less like oil, more like water," Barnard explained.

And because vegetarian diets are generally high in fruits and
vegetables, people who follow this diet consume more potassium than
those who eat a diet of meat and vegetables. The analysis cites two
reviews involving a total of 52 randomized clinical trials showing
potassium supplementation significantly lowered blood pressure in
people with normal and elevated blood pressure.

There are those who disagree with the finding, however.

Dr. Lawrence J. Appel, a nutrition specialist at the Johns Hopkins
Bloomberg School of Public Health, said the paper fails to establish a
clear cause-and-effect relationship between consuming a plant-based
diet and lowering one's blood pressure.

"It's a good review, but there are still unanswered questions," he
said.

He also noted that very few clinical trials have been conducted, and
that those that have been done are small and not tightly controlled.
Much of the data is observational.

So, he said, it remains unclear whether a vegetarian diet alone is
responsible for lowering blood pressure or whether some aspect of a
vegetarian regimen -- such as eating lots of fruits and vegetables rich
in potassiumand fiber while maintaining a desirable body weight --
could have the same effect.

And then there there is the fact that not everyone who has high blood
pressure eats poorly or is overweight; genetic factors significantly
influence a person's risk for hypertension.

Still, Barnard insists a vegetarian diet is healthy for everyone,
whether or not they have high blood pressure.

He offers this caveat for people taking blood pressure medication:
"Don't throw your medication in the trash." High blood pressure is a
serious medical condition requiring immediate medical attention. Even
if you switch to a vegetarian diet to trim down, you won't lose the
weight overnight, he said. It could take more than a year for a person
who is 60 pounds overweight to drop that excess baggage.

Barnard hopes the review will prompt more doctors to recommend a
vegetarian diet. Many are reluctant to do because they fear that
patients won't stick with it, but there's no reason to believe patients
would be less likely to go vegetarian than to comply with other diets,
he said.

"They may not hit the mark 100 percent, but they'd do much better if a
doctor recommended it," he said.

Barnard's group, the physicians committee, is a Washington, D.C.-based
nonprofit that promotes good nutrition, opposes unethical human
experimentation and advocates alternatives to animal research.
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Piezo Guru
medicine forum addict


Joined: 19 Mar 2005
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Veggie Diet May Lower High Blood Pressure Reply with quote

Better water supply.

"Roger Rabbit" <rogers@home.com> wrote in message
news:oam2019cni082l7tabmvmnlf8kpp814jl3@4ax.com...
Quote:

Perhaps Dr. Barnard can explain why it is that the largely vegetarian
population of southern India has a much shorter lifespan compared to
the Indians in the north where meat is consumed. The PCRM is a
vegetarian front that have their own agenda, not your health, at the
top of their priority.

rr

On 31 Jan 2005 16:03:46 -0800, "Roman Bystrianyk"
rbystrianyk@gmail.com> wrote:


http://www.healthsentinel.com/news.php?id=582&title=Veggie+Diet+May+Lower+H
igh+Blood+Pressure&event=news_print_list_item

Karen Pallarito, "Veggie Diet May Lower High Blood Pressure", ABC News,
January 21, 2005,
Link:

http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/01/21/hscout523461
..html

Vegetarians tend to have lower blood pressure than the general
population, but it hasn't been clear whether their diet or their
lifestyle guards them against hypertension.

Now, a new review of previously published studies claims that diet
provides the protection.

"It's the diet itself, and it is clearly the diet of choice for people
who want to get their blood pressure under control," said Dr. Neal D.
Barnard, president and founder of the Physicians Committee for
Responsible Medicine and co-author of the report, which appears in the
January issue of Nutrition Reviews.

Barnard, a nutritionist and author of the book Breaking the Food
Seduction: The Hidden Reasons Behind Food Cravings and Seven Steps to
End Them Naturally, concluded that a person who suffers from
hypertension and has yet to switch to a vegetarian diet is "really
trying to fight their condition with one arm tied behind their back."

About 65 million American adults have high blood pressure, according to
the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Hypertension is often
called the "silent killer" because it usually has no symptoms but leads
to increased risk for heart disease, congestive heart failure, stroke
and kidney failure.

Barnard and committee nutritionist Susan Berkow analyzed 80 scientific
studies, including observational studies of individuals on vegetarian
diets compared with non-vegetarians and randomized, controlled trials
in which outcomes of people who switch to a plant-based diet were
compared with control subjects.

"The purpose of our review was to bring together what is known about
the effect of the diet, but also what we know about the mechanism and
try to explain why this occurs," Barnard explained.

Some of the best observational data, according to the report, come from
studies involving Seventh-Day Adventists, who advocate an alcohol-free,
tobacco-free, vegetarian lifestyle. About 50 percent of Adventists
follow a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, which includes dairy products and
eggs, the authors noted.

One study involving California Adventists found that vegetarians have
about half the prevalence of hypertension compared to non-vegetarian
Adventists. When hypertensives were defined as those taking medication
intended to reduce their blood pressure, a nearly threefold difference
in the prevalence of hypertension was seen between the groups.

Overall, the randomized controlled trials included in the review found
that blood pressure is lowered when animal products were replaced with
vegetable products in both people with normal blood pressure and those
who are hypertensive.

To understand the blood-pressure-lowering effects of a plant-based
diet, the authors examined changes in body weight and intake of
specific food groups and nutrients.

Studies show that vegetarians tend to be slimmer, on average, which may
help explain their lower incidence of hypertension. A vegetarian diet
also is significantly lower in saturated fat, reducing the viscosity,
or thickness, of the blood.

Blood becomes "less like oil, more like water," Barnard explained.

And because vegetarian diets are generally high in fruits and
vegetables, people who follow this diet consume more potassium than
those who eat a diet of meat and vegetables. The analysis cites two
reviews involving a total of 52 randomized clinical trials showing
potassium supplementation significantly lowered blood pressure in
people with normal and elevated blood pressure.

There are those who disagree with the finding, however.

Dr. Lawrence J. Appel, a nutrition specialist at the Johns Hopkins
Bloomberg School of Public Health, said the paper fails to establish a
clear cause-and-effect relationship between consuming a plant-based
diet and lowering one's blood pressure.

"It's a good review, but there are still unanswered questions," he
said.

He also noted that very few clinical trials have been conducted, and
that those that have been done are small and not tightly controlled.
Much of the data is observational.

So, he said, it remains unclear whether a vegetarian diet alone is
responsible for lowering blood pressure or whether some aspect of a
vegetarian regimen -- such as eating lots of fruits and vegetables rich
in potassiumand fiber while maintaining a desirable body weight --
could have the same effect.

And then there there is the fact that not everyone who has high blood
pressure eats poorly or is overweight; genetic factors significantly
influence a person's risk for hypertension.

Still, Barnard insists a vegetarian diet is healthy for everyone,
whether or not they have high blood pressure.

He offers this caveat for people taking blood pressure medication:
"Don't throw your medication in the trash." High blood pressure is a
serious medical condition requiring immediate medical attention. Even
if you switch to a vegetarian diet to trim down, you won't lose the
weight overnight, he said. It could take more than a year for a person
who is 60 pounds overweight to drop that excess baggage.

Barnard hopes the review will prompt more doctors to recommend a
vegetarian diet. Many are reluctant to do because they fear that
patients won't stick with it, but there's no reason to believe patients
would be less likely to go vegetarian than to comply with other diets,
he said.

"They may not hit the mark 100 percent, but they'd do much better if a
doctor recommended it," he said.

Barnard's group, the physicians committee, is a Washington, D.C.-based
nonprofit that promotes good nutrition, opposes unethical human
experimentation and advocates alternatives to animal research.
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Roger Rabbit
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 280

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: HEALTH THREAT! Reply with quote

On 1 Feb 2005 11:27:31 -0800, "drlaibow" <healthfreedom@optonline.net>
wrote:

Quote:
So if you want to take a gram of Vitamin C,
for example, you would need to take 5 tabs of 200 mg (the max
allowable dose) each time you want that gram.

I live in Canada and I buy Vitamin C in 500 mg tablets. I used to buy
1000 mg tabs. I'll check to see if those are still available.

rr
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