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UV photoprotection / chocolate
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vernon
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 15 Jan 2006
Posts: 405

PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 5:30 pm    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

"Ron Peterson" <ron@shell.core.com> wrote in message
news:1152111517.447746.97810@b68g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

vernon wrote:
"Sherry" <hurst1st@sbcglobal.nospam> wrote in message
news:uZwqg.61708$fb2.37556@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net...
I just love chocolate!!!!! Wish that I could eat it and not pay the
price
with a migraine.
Glad to see you post Krista!

Quite often the headache / migrane is from the extra loaded sugar.
You probably don't want to torture yourself but VERY dark chocolate may
not
have the same effect.

According to discovery.com, "There are two ingredients in chocolate
that can trigger migraine headaches: caffeine and phenylethylamine.
These substances can constrict blood vessels, and constriction causes
head pain."

--
Ron

1. I said "quite often".

2. People with caffeine reaction are usually quite aware of it.
3. Migraine is not a "temporary" "constriction" as is "sometimes" in VERY
few people with caffeine. Caffeine usually has the opposite effect.
4. A chemical and physician description which is the OPPOSITE of what
"Discover" states.
Phenylethylamine is known as the "love drug" and is thought to be the reason
why chocolate is said to be an aphrodisiac. It is a chemical that mimics the
brain chemistry of a person in love, so when levels of phenylethylamine are
high in the body it relieves depression from unrequited love. This is one of
the reasons so many women love chocolate - it really is a mood elevator!

5. The "Discover" says "can". Peanuts "can" kill "some".
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Matti Narkia
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Posts: 425

PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 5:22 pm    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

On 5 Jul 2006 07:58:37 -0700, "Ron Peterson" <ron@shell.core.com>
wrote:
Quote:

vernon wrote:
"Sherry" <hurst1st@sbcglobal.nospam> wrote in message
news:uZwqg.61708$fb2.37556@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net...
I just love chocolate!!!!! Wish that I could eat it and not pay the price
with a migraine.
Glad to see you post Krista!

Quite often the headache / migrane is from the extra loaded sugar.
You probably don't want to torture yourself but VERY dark chocolate may not
have the same effect.

According to discovery.com, "There are two ingredients in chocolate
that can trigger migraine headaches: caffeine and phenylethylamine.
These substances can constrict blood vessels, and constriction causes
head pain."

Cocoa and chocolate have plenty of theobromine, which has similar, but
much milder effects (it can still be fatal dogs, who cannot metabolize
it as quickly as humans) than caffeine, but less caffeine than for
example coffee or black tea
(<http://www.cspinet.org/new/cafchart.htm>,
<http://www.faqs.org/faqs/caffeine-faq/>,
<http://coffeefaq.com/site/node/22>,
<http://coffeetea.about.com/library/blcaffeine.htm>).

Chocolate does contain phenylethylamine, which raises blood pressure
and blood glucose levels. Regardless of this, however, high flavanol
cocoa and dark chocolate induce vasodilation and reduce blood
pressure.

References:

Fisher ND, Hughes M, Gerhard-Herman M, Hollenberg NK.
Flavanol-rich cocoa induces nitric-oxide-dependent vasodilation in
healthy humans.
J Hypertens. 2003 Dec;21(12):2281-6.
PMID: 14654748 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=abstractplus&list_uids=14654748>

Engler MB, Engler MM, Chen CY, Malloy MJ, Browne A, Chiu EY, Kwak HK,
Milbury P, Paul SM, Blumberg J, Mietus-Snyder ML.
Flavonoid-rich dark chocolate improves endothelial function and
increases plasma epicatechin concentrations in healthy adults.
J Am Coll Nutr. 2004 Jun;23(3):197-204.
PMID: 15190043 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
<http://www.jacn.org/cgi/content/full/23/3/197>

Vlachopoulos C, Aznaouridis K, Alexopoulos N, Economou E, Andreadou I,
Stefanadis C.
Effect of dark chocolate on arterial function in healthy individuals.
Am J Hypertens. 2005 Jun;18(6):785-91.
PMID: 15925737 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=abstractplus&list_uids=15925737>

Heiss C, Kleinbongard P, Dejam A, Perre S, Schroeter H, Sies H, Kelm
M.
Acute consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa and the reversal of
endothelial dysfunction in smokers.
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Oct 4;46(7):1276-83.
PMID: 16198843 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=abstractplus&list_uids=16198843>

Grassi D, Necozione S, Lippi C, Croce G, Valeri L, Pasqualetti P,
Desideri G, Blumberg JB, Ferri C.
Cocoa reduces blood pressure and insulin resistance and improves
endothelium-dependent vasodilation in hypertensives.
Hypertension. 2005 Aug;46(2):398-405. Epub 2005 Jul 18.
PMID: 16027246 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
<http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/46/2/398>

Grassi D, Lippi C, Necozione S, Desideri G, Ferri C.
Short-term administration of dark chocolate is followed by a
significant increase in insulin sensitivity and a decrease in blood
pressure in healthy persons.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):611-4.
PMID: 15755830 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
<http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/81/3/611>

Actis-Goretta L, Ottaviani JI, Fraga CG.
Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme activity by flavanol-rich
foods.
J Agric Food Chem. 2006 Jan 11;54(1):229-34.
PMID: 16390204 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=abstractplus&list_uids=16390204>

Engler MB, Engler MM.
The emerging role of flavonoid-rich cocoa and chocolate in
cardiovascular health and disease.
Nutr Rev. 2006 Mar;64(3):109-18. Review.
PMID: 16572598 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE
<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=abstractplus&list_uids=16572598>

Fisher ND, Sorond FA, Hollenberg NK.
Cocoa Flavanols and Brain Perfusion.
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2006 Jun;47 Suppl 2:S210-S214.
PMID: 16794460 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=abstractplus&list_uids=16794460>

Schroeter H, Heiss C, Balzer J, Kleinbongard P, Keen CL, Hollenberg
NK, Sies H, Kwik-Uribe C, Schmitz HH, Kelm M.
(-)-Epicatechin mediates beneficial effects of flavanol-rich cocoa on
vascular function in humans.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Jan 24;103(4):1024-9. Epub 2006 Jan 17.
PMID: 16418281 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
<http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/103/4/1024>

Ding EL, Hutfless SM, Ding X, Girotra S.
Chocolate and prevention of cardiovascular disease: a systematic
review.
Nutr Metab (Lond). 2006 Jan 3;3:2.
PMID: 16390538 [PubMed - in process]
<http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/3/1/2>

Buijsse B, Feskens EJ, Kok FJ, Kromhout D.
Cocoa intake, blood pressure, and cardiovascular mortality: the
Zutphen Elderly Study.
Arch Intern Med. 2006 Feb 27;166(4):411-7.
PMID: 16505260 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=abstractplus&list_uids=16505260>


IMHO its better to use natural unsweetened cocoa powder mixed in
liquid than chocolate, which is more processed and usually comes with
plenty of added sugar.







--
Matti Narkia
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Ron Peterson
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 18 May 2005
Posts: 181

PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 2:58 pm    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

vernon wrote:
Quote:
"Sherry" <hurst1st@sbcglobal.nospam> wrote in message
news:uZwqg.61708$fb2.37556@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net...
I just love chocolate!!!!! Wish that I could eat it and not pay the price
with a migraine.
Glad to see you post Krista!

Quite often the headache / migrane is from the extra loaded sugar.
You probably don't want to torture yourself but VERY dark chocolate may not
have the same effect.

According to discovery.com, "There are two ingredients in chocolate
that can trigger migraine headaches: caffeine and phenylethylamine.
These substances can constrict blood vessels, and constriction causes
head pain."

--
Ron
Back to top
Jim Chinnis
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 1030

PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 2:38 pm    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

"Krista" <kdp8575@gmail.com> wrote in part:

Quote:

William R Thompson wrote:
"Krista" wrote:

My pain doctor told me that Dove chocolate is the only one with
flavanoids. So she told me if I wanted chocolate that was the best to
eat!

Are you sure he didn't mean dark chocolate?

Yes darlin', I'm sure. I may be crazy but I'm not a moron.

But I can be a dumbass at certain times. (Not about chocolate though.)

Dove Dark chocolate was developed by Mars (candy company) incorporating the
cocoa they have come up with that preserves more of the flavinols. They also
sell a range of other products, usually identified with a CocoaPro
trademark, particularly in Europe.

Cocoa loses most of its flavinols when processed by the usual means. The
best would probably be the type used by the locals in Guatamala, where
processing is minimal. What Mars has done is to find a way to preserve a bit
of the flavinols using a process that will still produce the chocolate
flavor their customers are used to in a heavily sweetened candy.

I eat a variety of dark, high cocoa-butter chocolate myself and usually skip
Mars's products because of the high sugar content.
--
Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA jchinnis@alum.mit.edu
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Krista
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 04 Jul 2006
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 6:36 am    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

Speaking of chocolate, I forgot I ran across a chocolate bar at a
health food store called health by chocolate, women's wonder bar (sorry
fellas!). It says take sweet revenge on PMS, menopause and everyday
cravings with this delicious swiss chocolate, rose oil, and herbs and
soy. The manager said that she had alot of return business for this
little treat. look it up by healthbychocolate.com
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Krista
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 04 Jul 2006
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 6:22 am    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

William R Thompson wrote:
Quote:
"Krista" wrote:

My pain doctor told me that Dove chocolate is the only one with
flavanoids. So she told me if I wanted chocolate that was the best to
eat!

Are you sure he didn't mean dark chocolate?

Yes darlin', I'm sure. I may be crazy but I'm not a moron.

But I can be a dumbass at certain times. (Not about chocolate though.)
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Krista
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 04 Jul 2006
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2006 6:18 am    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

GMCarter wrote:
Quote:
On 3 Jul 2006 21:36:25 -0700, "Krista" <kdp8575@gmail.com> wrote:

My pain doctor told me that == chocolate is the only one with
flavanoids. So she told me if I wanted chocolate that was the best to
eat!

No. No Brand is best to eat. The best chocolate is the DARKEST
chocolate, highest in cocoa content. That's step one to look for in a
good chocolate.

Equally important, in my view, is getting a FAIR TRADE chocolate. This
helps to ensure that the earnings from the sale of the chocolate help
the people that grow it. A much better system than buying just any
chocolate, which at times has been associated with the most horrific
maltreatment of local villagers (getting their arms cut off, things
like that).

So: DARK and FAIR TRADE. Then you can enjoy with a good heart and do
your body some pleasurable good!

George M. Carter

Ok George, I am just saying what she told me. She won't let me eat
anything. I knew that about dark chocolate, I prefer that, but it's
harder to find. I'm not really sure what a FAIR TRADE chocolate is or
how to check the chocolate to see how many villagers got their arms
chopped off, er, other things chopped off? No wonder the Oompa Loompas
are so short... (Ok that was a joke, I don't care who you are that's
funny right there...)

Are you a chocolate scientist George? That would be a cool job.
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vernon
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 15 Jan 2006
Posts: 405

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 7:34 pm    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

"Sherry" <hurst1st@sbcglobal.nospam> wrote in message
news:uZwqg.61708$fb2.37556@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net...
Quote:
I just love chocolate!!!!! Wish that I could eat it and not pay the price
with a migraine.
Glad to see you post Krista!

Hugs,
Sherry

Quite often the headache / migrane is from the extra loaded sugar.
You probably don't want to torture yourself but VERY dark chocolate may not
have the same effect.


Quote:


"Krista" <kdp8575@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1151987785.478459.302170@75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
My pain doctor told me that Dove chocolate is the only one with
flavanoids. So she told me if I wanted chocolate that was the best to
eat!

~ Krista

ironjustice@aol.com wrote:
Flavanol-rich chocolate could improve skin from within

By Stephen Daniells


16/05/2006 - Cocoa beverages and food rich in flavanols could thicken
skin and reduce reddening by 25 per cent, say German scientists -
research sure to be welcomed by Europe's burgeoning oral beauty
products sector.

Growing awareness of the link between diet and health, and by extension
physical appearance, means that many consumers are receptive to the
concept of 'beauty from within'.
Indeed, a recent Datamonitor report predicted the overall European
cosmeceuticals market to grow to $4.4bn (?3.4bn) in 2009, up 5 per
cent from today. This includes all cosmetic products containing at
least one bio-active ingredient for the skin.

The new research from Germany that links skin health to cocoa flavanols
could well be readily accepted by the female-dominated consumer base.
The same Datamonitor report said that 63.7 per cent of women over the
age of 50 are prepared to spend more on cosmeceuticals.

"This study demonstrates that the regular consumption of a beverage
rich in flavanols can confer substantial photoprotection as well as
help maintain skin health by improving skin structure and function,"
wrote the researchers in the new issue of the Journal of Nutrition (Vol
136, pp 1565-1569).

Led by Wilhelm Stahl from the Heinrich-Heine University in Dusseldorf,
the researchers supplemented the regular diet of 24 female volunteers
with healthy, normal skin with either a high flavanol (326 milligrams
per day) or low flavanol (27 milligrams per day) cocoa powder drink
(dissolved in water). Both flavanol powders were provided by Mars.

Women were advised to continue their normal dietary habits, while other
dietary supplements were not to be taken during the 12-week
intervention trial. Sunbathing and use of tanning beds was also
forbidden.

On three separate occasions (weeks 0, 6, and 12), the skin of
volunteers was exposed to 1.25 times the UV irradiation dose required
to redden the skin (erythema) on the back and shoulder region.

The researchers found that the group receiving the high flavanol cocoa
beverage had a reduction in skin response to the UV radiation of 15 per
cent after week 6, and 25 per cent after week 12, compared to baseline.
The low flavanol receiving group did not affect UV sensitivity.

"We showed here for the first time, to our knowledge, that dietary
intervention with a cocoa beverage rich in flavanols decreased the
sensitivity of human skin toward UV light, which was determined by the
degree of erythema," wrote the researchers.

In addition to the reduction in sensitivity, the researchers also
observed an increase in subcutaneous blood flow for the high flavanol
group, as well as improving skin texture by increasing skin density (16
per cent), skin thickness (12 per cent), and skin hydration (28 per
cent), compared to baseline. No significant changes were observed in
the low flavanol group.

Polyphenols, such as the catechins found in cocoa, are reported to
absorb UV light, which may contribute to the reduction in UV
sensitivity. The compounds are also capable of scavenging reactive
oxygen species (ROS) that are formed during photo-oxidation.

The main flavanols found in the high flavanol beverage were epicatechin
(61 milligrams per day) and catechins (20 mg/d), while the low flavanol
drink contained about one tenth these concentrations.

"These amounts [in the high flavanol beverage] are similar to those
found in 100 grams of dark chocolate," explained the researchers.

The mechanisms by which the cocoa flavanols improve skin texture are
not known, but Prof Stahl and his colleagues suggest that the
flavanol-mediated rise in skin blood flow is likely to improve the
appearance of the skin.

This research is in-line with previous animal studies that reported tea
flavanols could inhibit UV-induced skin reddening, but Co-author Prof
Helmut Sies, also from the Heinrich-Heine University, stressed to
NutraIngredients.com that this is the first such study to show a
benefit in a human trial, and said that research in this area was
continuing.




Who loves ya.
Tom


Jesus Was A Vegetarian!
http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com


Man Is A Herbivore!
http://tinyurl.com/a3cc3


DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
http://tinyurl.com/zk9fk

Back to top
Sherry
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 26 May 2005
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 4:48 pm    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

I just love chocolate!!!!! Wish that I could eat it and not pay the price
with a migraine.
Glad to see you post Krista!

Hugs,
Sherry


"Krista" <kdp8575@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1151987785.478459.302170@75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
My pain doctor told me that Dove chocolate is the only one with
flavanoids. So she told me if I wanted chocolate that was the best to
eat!

~ Krista

ironjustice@aol.com wrote:
Quote:
Flavanol-rich chocolate could improve skin from within

By Stephen Daniells


16/05/2006 - Cocoa beverages and food rich in flavanols could thicken
skin and reduce reddening by 25 per cent, say German scientists -
research sure to be welcomed by Europe's burgeoning oral beauty
products sector.

Growing awareness of the link between diet and health, and by extension
physical appearance, means that many consumers are receptive to the
concept of 'beauty from within'.
Indeed, a recent Datamonitor report predicted the overall European
cosmeceuticals market to grow to $4.4bn (?3.4bn) in 2009, up 5 per
cent from today. This includes all cosmetic products containing at
least one bio-active ingredient for the skin.

The new research from Germany that links skin health to cocoa flavanols
could well be readily accepted by the female-dominated consumer base.
The same Datamonitor report said that 63.7 per cent of women over the
age of 50 are prepared to spend more on cosmeceuticals.

"This study demonstrates that the regular consumption of a beverage
rich in flavanols can confer substantial photoprotection as well as
help maintain skin health by improving skin structure and function,"
wrote the researchers in the new issue of the Journal of Nutrition (Vol
136, pp 1565-1569).

Led by Wilhelm Stahl from the Heinrich-Heine University in Dusseldorf,
the researchers supplemented the regular diet of 24 female volunteers
with healthy, normal skin with either a high flavanol (326 milligrams
per day) or low flavanol (27 milligrams per day) cocoa powder drink
(dissolved in water). Both flavanol powders were provided by Mars.

Women were advised to continue their normal dietary habits, while other
dietary supplements were not to be taken during the 12-week
intervention trial. Sunbathing and use of tanning beds was also
forbidden.

On three separate occasions (weeks 0, 6, and 12), the skin of
volunteers was exposed to 1.25 times the UV irradiation dose required
to redden the skin (erythema) on the back and shoulder region.

The researchers found that the group receiving the high flavanol cocoa
beverage had a reduction in skin response to the UV radiation of 15 per
cent after week 6, and 25 per cent after week 12, compared to baseline.
The low flavanol receiving group did not affect UV sensitivity.

"We showed here for the first time, to our knowledge, that dietary
intervention with a cocoa beverage rich in flavanols decreased the
sensitivity of human skin toward UV light, which was determined by the
degree of erythema," wrote the researchers.

In addition to the reduction in sensitivity, the researchers also
observed an increase in subcutaneous blood flow for the high flavanol
group, as well as improving skin texture by increasing skin density (16
per cent), skin thickness (12 per cent), and skin hydration (28 per
cent), compared to baseline. No significant changes were observed in
the low flavanol group.

Polyphenols, such as the catechins found in cocoa, are reported to
absorb UV light, which may contribute to the reduction in UV
sensitivity. The compounds are also capable of scavenging reactive
oxygen species (ROS) that are formed during photo-oxidation.

The main flavanols found in the high flavanol beverage were epicatechin
(61 milligrams per day) and catechins (20 mg/d), while the low flavanol
drink contained about one tenth these concentrations.

"These amounts [in the high flavanol beverage] are similar to those
found in 100 grams of dark chocolate," explained the researchers.

The mechanisms by which the cocoa flavanols improve skin texture are
not known, but Prof Stahl and his colleagues suggest that the
flavanol-mediated rise in skin blood flow is likely to improve the
appearance of the skin.

This research is in-line with previous animal studies that reported tea
flavanols could inhibit UV-induced skin reddening, but Co-author Prof
Helmut Sies, also from the Heinrich-Heine University, stressed to
NutraIngredients.com that this is the first such study to show a
benefit in a human trial, and said that research in this area was
continuing.




Who loves ya.
Tom


Jesus Was A Vegetarian!
http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com


Man Is A Herbivore!
http://tinyurl.com/a3cc3


DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
http://tinyurl.com/zk9fk
Back to top
William R Thompson
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 04 Jul 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 2:15 pm    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

"Krista" wrote:

Quote:
My pain doctor told me that Dove chocolate is the only one with
flavanoids. So she told me if I wanted chocolate that was the best to
eat!

Are you sure he didn't mean dark chocolate?

As for the OP, you can always count on Rusty to raise a topic,
then talk endlessly about it yet never say anything relevant.

Bavarian Chocolate Pie

Ingredients:

9 inch baked pie shell
1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1 and 2/3 cup milk (divided)
2/3 cup white sugar
1/3 cup cocoa powder
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup chilled whipping cream

In medium saucepan, sprinkle the gelatin evenly over
1 cup of milk, and let stand for 2 minutes to soften.
In a separate bowl combine the sugar and cocoa, then
add to the milk and gelatin mixture. Cook over low
heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture boils.
Remove from hear; add butter and stir until the butter
melts. Blend in remaining 2/3 cup milk and vanilla.
Cool, then chill and stir occasionally until mixture
begins to set; about one hour. Beat cream until stiff,
then carefully fold into the chocolate mixture. Pour
into pie shell and chill until set.

Cover the set pie with Spiced Cream topping:

1 and 1/2 cup chilled whipping cream
3 tablespoons confectioner's (powdered) sugar
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoon ground cinammon
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Pour the cream in a bowl; add all other ingredients
and beat until stiff. Spread over the pie.

--Bill Thompson
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GMCarter
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 193

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 8:39 am    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

On 3 Jul 2006 21:36:25 -0700, "Krista" <kdp8575@gmail.com> wrote:

Quote:
My pain doctor told me that == chocolate is the only one with
flavanoids. So she told me if I wanted chocolate that was the best to
eat!

No. No Brand is best to eat. The best chocolate is the DARKEST
chocolate, highest in cocoa content. That's step one to look for in a
good chocolate.

Equally important, in my view, is getting a FAIR TRADE chocolate. This
helps to ensure that the earnings from the sale of the chocolate help
the people that grow it. A much better system than buying just any
chocolate, which at times has been associated with the most horrific
maltreatment of local villagers (getting their arms cut off, things
like that).

So: DARK and FAIR TRADE. Then you can enjoy with a good heart and do
your body some pleasurable good!

George M. Carter
Back to top
Starlight
medicine forum Guru Wannabe


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 186

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 4:50 am    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

On 3 Jul 2006 21:36:25 -0700, "Krista" <kdp8575@gmail.com> posted:

Quote:
My pain doctor told me that Dove chocolate is the only one with
flavanoids. So she told me if I wanted chocolate that was the best to
eat!


Dove makes a specific dark chocolate candy that has a lot of flavanols
in it, but any dark chocolate candy contains them. The flavonoids
are found in the cocoa, and dark chocolate candy contains more cocoa
than milk chocolate or white chocolate.
Back to top
Krista
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 04 Jul 2006
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 4:36 am    Post subject: Re: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

My pain doctor told me that Dove chocolate is the only one with
flavanoids. So she told me if I wanted chocolate that was the best to
eat!

~ Krista

ironjustice@aol.com wrote:
Quote:
Flavanol-rich chocolate could improve skin from within

By Stephen Daniells


16/05/2006 - Cocoa beverages and food rich in flavanols could thicken
skin and reduce reddening by 25 per cent, say German scientists -
research sure to be welcomed by Europe's burgeoning oral beauty
products sector.

Growing awareness of the link between diet and health, and by extension
physical appearance, means that many consumers are receptive to the
concept of 'beauty from within'.
Indeed, a recent Datamonitor report predicted the overall European
cosmeceuticals market to grow to $4.4bn (3.4bn) in 2009, up 5 per
cent from today. This includes all cosmetic products containing at
least one bio-active ingredient for the skin.

The new research from Germany that links skin health to cocoa flavanols
could well be readily accepted by the female-dominated consumer base.
The same Datamonitor report said that 63.7 per cent of women over the
age of 50 are prepared to spend more on cosmeceuticals.

"This study demonstrates that the regular consumption of a beverage
rich in flavanols can confer substantial photoprotection as well as
help maintain skin health by improving skin structure and function,"
wrote the researchers in the new issue of the Journal of Nutrition (Vol
136, pp 1565-1569).

Led by Wilhelm Stahl from the Heinrich-Heine University in Dusseldorf,
the researchers supplemented the regular diet of 24 female volunteers
with healthy, normal skin with either a high flavanol (326 milligrams
per day) or low flavanol (27 milligrams per day) cocoa powder drink
(dissolved in water). Both flavanol powders were provided by Mars.

Women were advised to continue their normal dietary habits, while other
dietary supplements were not to be taken during the 12-week
intervention trial. Sunbathing and use of tanning beds was also
forbidden.

On three separate occasions (weeks 0, 6, and 12), the skin of
volunteers was exposed to 1.25 times the UV irradiation dose required
to redden the skin (erythema) on the back and shoulder region.

The researchers found that the group receiving the high flavanol cocoa
beverage had a reduction in skin response to the UV radiation of 15 per
cent after week 6, and 25 per cent after week 12, compared to baseline.
The low flavanol receiving group did not affect UV sensitivity.

"We showed here for the first time, to our knowledge, that dietary
intervention with a cocoa beverage rich in flavanols decreased the
sensitivity of human skin toward UV light, which was determined by the
degree of erythema," wrote the researchers.

In addition to the reduction in sensitivity, the researchers also
observed an increase in subcutaneous blood flow for the high flavanol
group, as well as improving skin texture by increasing skin density (16
per cent), skin thickness (12 per cent), and skin hydration (28 per
cent), compared to baseline. No significant changes were observed in
the low flavanol group.

Polyphenols, such as the catechins found in cocoa, are reported to
absorb UV light, which may contribute to the reduction in UV
sensitivity. The compounds are also capable of scavenging reactive
oxygen species (ROS) that are formed during photo-oxidation.

The main flavanols found in the high flavanol beverage were epicatechin
(61 milligrams per day) and catechins (20 mg/d), while the low flavanol
drink contained about one tenth these concentrations.

"These amounts [in the high flavanol beverage] are similar to those
found in 100 grams of dark chocolate," explained the researchers.

The mechanisms by which the cocoa flavanols improve skin texture are
not known, but Prof Stahl and his colleagues suggest that the
flavanol-mediated rise in skin blood flow is likely to improve the
appearance of the skin.

This research is in-line with previous animal studies that reported tea
flavanols could inhibit UV-induced skin reddening, but Co-author Prof
Helmut Sies, also from the Heinrich-Heine University, stressed to
NutraIngredients.com that this is the first such study to show a
benefit in a human trial, and said that research in this area was
continuing.




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Tom


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Joined: 28 Apr 2005
Posts: 1522

PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2006 4:27 pm    Post subject: UV photoprotection / chocolate Reply with quote

Flavanol-rich chocolate could improve skin from within

By Stephen Daniells


16/05/2006 - Cocoa beverages and food rich in flavanols could thicken
skin and reduce reddening by 25 per cent, say German scientists -
research sure to be welcomed by Europe's burgeoning oral beauty
products sector.

Growing awareness of the link between diet and health, and by extension
physical appearance, means that many consumers are receptive to the
concept of 'beauty from within'.
Indeed, a recent Datamonitor report predicted the overall European
cosmeceuticals market to grow to $4.4bn (3.4bn) in 2009, up 5 per
cent from today. This includes all cosmetic products containing at
least one bio-active ingredient for the skin.

The new research from Germany that links skin health to cocoa flavanols
could well be readily accepted by the female-dominated consumer base.
The same Datamonitor report said that 63.7 per cent of women over the
age of 50 are prepared to spend more on cosmeceuticals.

"This study demonstrates that the regular consumption of a beverage
rich in flavanols can confer substantial photoprotection as well as
help maintain skin health by improving skin structure and function,"
wrote the researchers in the new issue of the Journal of Nutrition (Vol
136, pp 1565-1569).

Led by Wilhelm Stahl from the Heinrich-Heine University in Dusseldorf,
the researchers supplemented the regular diet of 24 female volunteers
with healthy, normal skin with either a high flavanol (326 milligrams
per day) or low flavanol (27 milligrams per day) cocoa powder drink
(dissolved in water). Both flavanol powders were provided by Mars.

Women were advised to continue their normal dietary habits, while other
dietary supplements were not to be taken during the 12-week
intervention trial. Sunbathing and use of tanning beds was also
forbidden.

On three separate occasions (weeks 0, 6, and 12), the skin of
volunteers was exposed to 1.25 times the UV irradiation dose required
to redden the skin (erythema) on the back and shoulder region.

The researchers found that the group receiving the high flavanol cocoa
beverage had a reduction in skin response to the UV radiation of 15 per
cent after week 6, and 25 per cent after week 12, compared to baseline.
The low flavanol receiving group did not affect UV sensitivity.

"We showed here for the first time, to our knowledge, that dietary
intervention with a cocoa beverage rich in flavanols decreased the
sensitivity of human skin toward UV light, which was determined by the
degree of erythema," wrote the researchers.

In addition to the reduction in sensitivity, the researchers also
observed an increase in subcutaneous blood flow for the high flavanol
group, as well as improving skin texture by increasing skin density (16
per cent), skin thickness (12 per cent), and skin hydration (28 per
cent), compared to baseline. No significant changes were observed in
the low flavanol group.

Polyphenols, such as the catechins found in cocoa, are reported to
absorb UV light, which may contribute to the reduction in UV
sensitivity. The compounds are also capable of scavenging reactive
oxygen species (ROS) that are formed during photo-oxidation.

The main flavanols found in the high flavanol beverage were epicatechin
(61 milligrams per day) and catechins (20 mg/d), while the low flavanol
drink contained about one tenth these concentrations.

"These amounts [in the high flavanol beverage] are similar to those
found in 100 grams of dark chocolate," explained the researchers.

The mechanisms by which the cocoa flavanols improve skin texture are
not known, but Prof Stahl and his colleagues suggest that the
flavanol-mediated rise in skin blood flow is likely to improve the
appearance of the skin.

This research is in-line with previous animal studies that reported tea
flavanols could inhibit UV-induced skin reddening, but Co-author Prof
Helmut Sies, also from the Heinrich-Heine University, stressed to
NutraIngredients.com that this is the first such study to show a
benefit in a human trial, and said that research in this area was
continuing.




Who loves ya.
Tom


Jesus Was A Vegetarian!
http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com


Man Is A Herbivore!
http://tinyurl.com/a3cc3


DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
http://tinyurl.com/zk9fk
Back to top
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