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Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control
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William Wagner
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 809

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 3:03 pm    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

In article <4gcsr6F1n07arU1@individual.net>,
Susan <nevermind@nomail.com> wrote:

Quote:
x-no-archive: yes

Susan wrote:

If doctors and patients understood how rapidly and easily CVD and DM
prevention and risk management were with low carb with or without
exercise, their stock prices would plummet.

Well, there's an incoherent statement!

I meant that stock prices for DM and lipid lowering and bp drug
companies would plummet, along with the lipids, blood glucose and blood
pressure of those who eat lower carb.

Low carbing drops bg and triglycerides like a rock, while typically
raising HDL.

Susan

Karl Jung had a word for this Sychronicity.

Enjoy


Bill

..............


http://www.medpagetoday.com/Endocrinology/Diabetes/dh/3631

AHA and ADA Declare Truce in Metabolic Syndrome Squabble




 
By Peggy Peck, Managing Editor, MedPage Today
Reviewed by Rubeen K. Israni, M.D., Fellow, Renal-Electrolyte and
Hypertension Division, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
June 26, 2006
Also covered by: Yahoo! News

MedPage Today Action Points

€ Explain to patients who ask that the disputed metabolic syndrome
is a compilation of a number of risk factors, including dyslipidemia,
hypertension, obesity, and insulin resistance.

€ Be aware that both the AHA and ADA recommend using risk assessment
algorithms.
Review
DALLAS, June 26 ‹ The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the
American Heart Association (AHA) have decided to paper over their public
differences on the validity of the metabolic syndrome as a treatable
diagnosis.
To that end, both groups today issued a joint statement declaring that
they remain "unified and committed to reducing the burden of diabetes
and cardiovascular disease."
The statement, which was being simultaneously published by Diabetes Care
and Circulation, Journal of the American Heart Association, said the
widespread publicity over the divergent views of the usefulness of
metabolic syndrome as a diagnosis was becoming counterproductive to the
overriding goals of both groups.
"Unfortunately, some of the medical press have positioned the scientific
issues related to the metabolic syndrome as a 'battle' between the
American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association,
implicitly suggesting that cardiovascular disease risk factor
identification and treatment is now questionable," they wrote. "We are
concerned that the presumed dispute will lead to a reduction in the
favorable trend of many aspects of cardiovascular disease risk factor
reduction."
The joint statement was co-authored by AHA president Robert Eckel, M.D.,
ADA president Robert A. Rizza, M.D., along with Rose Marie Robertson,
M.D., and Richard Kahn, Ph.D., chief science officers of the AHA and the
ADA, respectively.
The joint statement emphasized agreement. It backed an emphasis on
treating "a core set of risk factors (pre-diabetes, hypertension,
dyslipidemia, and obesity)" as well as smoking. The statement
sidestepped the genesis of the still-simmering disagreement‹a dispute
that neither group tried to hide‹the definition of metabolic syndrome.
Last year the ADA signed onto a European Association for the Study of
Diabetes (EASD) statement published in the August issue of Diabetes
Care. It said, "We found that the metabolic syndrome has been
imprecisely defined, there is a lack of certainty regarding its
pathogenesis, and there is considerable doubt regarding its value as a
cardiovascular disease risk marker. Our analysis indicates that too much
critically important information is missing to warrant its designation
as a 'syndrome.' Until much needed research is completed, clinicians
should evaluate and treat all cardiovascular disease risk factors
without regard to whether a patient meets the criteria for diagnosis of
the 'metabolic syndrome.'"
A month later the AHA, along with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute, issued an updated statement on metabolic syndrome, which it
declared a real and growing health problem. The AHA/NHLBI statement
included one major change-it identified fasting glucose as a key risk
factor and dropped the threshold for elevated fasting glucose from 110
mg/dL to 100 mg/dL or higher, which matched the glucose threshold
endorsed by the ADA.
In a series of back and forth comments made at the European Society of
Cardiology meeting and the EASD in last September, the two organizations
traded soft jabs. Dr. Eckel, who is himself an endocrinologist at the
University of Colorado, said the diabetologists raised some valid points
about the metabolic syndrome definition. But he added there are "no
doubts that the metabolic syndrome exists."
At the same time Dr. Rizza of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said
he was not at all disturbed by the difference of opinion. "The real
issue is whether the concept of metabolic syndrome adds value to
treatment of persons with diabetes." He suggested it did not.
Dr. Kahn said from the ADA standpoint, "there doesn't appear to be any
evidence that a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is helpful. To step back
and say this (metabolic syndrome) doesn't exist is a train that is hard
to stop and reverse, but more and more people are challenging the
conceptŠI think the tide is actually turning on this concept."
Now, however, the AHA and ADA say they are putting their disagreements
aside in pursuit of the greater goal‹"a reduction in heart disease,
stroke and new-onset diabetes."
To that end they suggested that a useful tool for estimating risk of
diabetes and cardiovascular disease is
http://www.diabetes.org/diabetesphd/default.jsp, a free assessment tool
that has been "extensively validated" in a number of studies yet is
"rarely used in clinical practice."
A low tech approach, which they say may also be an effective first step,
is "simply ascertaining a person's blood glucose level, blood pressure,
LDL cholesterol level, and tobacco use and noting the presence of
obesity."
In a vague reference to metabolic syndrome, the statement cautioned that
even "borderline abnormalities, especially if they are multiple, may
well presage future problems and should be addressed."
The AHA/NHLBI defined metabolic syndrome as a group of metabolic risk
factors in one person. Those risk factors include abdominal obesity,
atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, insulin resistance,
prothrombotic state and proinflammatory state.

Finally, the AHA/ADA statement concluded that despite "many unresolved
scientific issues, a number of cardiometabolic risk factors have been
clearly shown to be closely related to diabetes and cardiovascular
disease: fasting/postprandial hyperglycemia, overweight/obesity,
elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and dyslipidemia.
Although pharmacologic therapy is often indicated when overt disease is
detected, in the early stages of these conditions, lifestyle
modification with attention to weight loss and physical activity may
well be sufficient."
Source reference:
Eckel RH et al "Preventing Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes: A Call
to Action from the American Diabetes Association and American Heart
Association" Circulation 206; 113: 2943-2946

--
S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
This article is posted under fair use rules in accordance with
Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, and is strictly for the educational
and informative purposes. This material is distributed without profit.
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Susan
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 2:15 pm    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

x-no-archive: yes

Susan wrote:

Quote:
If doctors and patients understood how rapidly and easily CVD and DM
prevention and risk management were with low carb with or without
exercise, their stock prices would plummet.

Well, there's an incoherent statement!

I meant that stock prices for DM and lipid lowering and bp drug
companies would plummet, along with the lipids, blood glucose and blood
pressure of those who eat lower carb.

Low carbing drops bg and triglycerides like a rock, while typically
raising HDL.

Susan
Back to top
Susan
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 2:12 pm    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

x-no-archive: yes

Sharon Hope wrote:
Quote:
Since you are on the topic of diabetes, did you happen to see the articles
on the Beagle who won the lifesaving award?
She actually dialed 911 (yes, on purpose) to save her master's life.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/bizarre/3985928.html

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060620/ap_on_fe_st/hero_dog_2

She is a specially trained diabetic service dog.

"Using their keen sense of smell, the animals can detect abnormalities in a
person's blood-sugar levels.
The dog periodically licks Weaver's nose to take her own reading of his
blood-sugar level. If something seems off to her, she will paw and whine at
him.

"Every time she paws at me like that I grab my meter and test myself,"
Weaver said. "She's never been wrong.""


Having known some child diabetics, I can't help but wonder why they don't
all have dogs who lick their noses, which has to be far preferable to taking
blood tests every day. Has to be much more fun, and lots of additional
health benefits from having a best friend, vs a sharp tester.


Sharon, they don't need dogs to lick their noses to find they're running
sugars that high, they need doctors and nutritionists to stop telling
them to eat most of their calories from starches.

Susan
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Susan
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 2:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

x-no-archive: yes

William Wagner wrote:

Quote:
Gut feeling...blood sugar and heart issues will become more
intertwined. Obesity, blood sugar and CAD require a new word. OBBSCAD?


They already are completely intertwined, which is why the drug pushers
for both CVD and DM are doing everything they can to promote high carb,
low fat diets.

If doctors and patients understood how rapidly and easily CVD and DM
prevention and risk management were with low carb with or without
exercise, their stock prices would plummet.

Syndrome X, metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia.
Anyone curious enough to google up these terms with CVD, DM and even
cancers (particularly pancreatic, prostate, breast and ovarian) will get
the same shock of realization I once did.

Susan
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William Wagner
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 29 Apr 2005
Posts: 809

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 1:55 pm    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

In article <4gbi5uF1jneggU1@individual.net>,
Susan <nevermind@nomail.com> wrote:

Quote:
x-no-archive: yes

Jim Chinnis wrote:

I don't know the history, but I assume the bad medical advice came first.
Then the "sponsors" saw a good thing and jumped on board. And now it's
harder to correct the bad medicine because of the sponsors.

Is that the story?

It's sort of. The diagnostic threshold was set deliberatly too high to
diagnose most type 2s back in the 70s, I think it was, because there was
no treatment or meters for home use and there was lots of employment and
health insurance discrimination. Noble of them. Not so of those
perpetuating those ranges, though, now that we know how much damage
occurs with any fbg above 100 or post prandial above 140.

Unfortunately, this rationale has gotten lost in the years that gave
us meters and more knowledge about prevention and the drug metformin,
and lots of folks develop advanced diabetic complications while still
running blood glucose in the "pre-diabetic" range. I'm talking
peripheral neuropathies, nephropathy and retinopathies, along with
autonomic neuropathies.

Those sponsors don't want us eating in a way that keeps us in normal
healthy ranges of bg; it means doing without all or most of their
products, except for generic metformin.

See phlaunt.com/diabetes

Susan

Thanks for pointing out phlaunt.com/diabetes !

Another interesting turning point that happened in the 70s was Earl
Butz's decision to encourage the growing of corn. Earl was the Sec. of
agriculture . With all the resulting corn what to do with it became an
issue. Answer whiskey and high fructose corn syrup. We are talking
lots of carbs here. The latter is in just about everything.
Perhaps the switch to ethanol will lower our carbohydrate
consumption? However I hear it takes more energy to make it. If global
warming is a reality carbon is still carbon. A rock and a hot place.

Gut feeling...blood sugar and heart issues will become more
intertwined. Obesity, blood sugar and CAD require a new word. OBBSCAD?

Bill

--
S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
This article is posted under fair use rules in accordance with
Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, and is strictly for the educational
and informative purposes. This material is distributed without profit.
Back to top
Sharon Hope
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 752

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 2:40 am    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

Since you are on the topic of diabetes, did you happen to see the articles
on the Beagle who won the lifesaving award?
She actually dialed 911 (yes, on purpose) to save her master's life.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/bizarre/3985928.html

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060620/ap_on_fe_st/hero_dog_2

She is a specially trained diabetic service dog.

"Using their keen sense of smell, the animals can detect abnormalities in a
person's blood-sugar levels.
The dog periodically licks Weaver's nose to take her own reading of his
blood-sugar level. If something seems off to her, she will paw and whine at
him.

"Every time she paws at me like that I grab my meter and test myself,"
Weaver said. "She's never been wrong.""


Having known some child diabetics, I can't help but wonder why they don't
all have dogs who lick their noses, which has to be far preferable to taking
blood tests every day. Has to be much more fun, and lots of additional
health benefits from having a best friend, vs a sharp tester.


"Susan" <nevermind@nomail.com> wrote in message
news:4gbi5uF1jneggU1@individual.net...
Quote:
x-no-archive: yes

Jim Chinnis wrote:

I don't know the history, but I assume the bad medical advice came first.
Then the "sponsors" saw a good thing and jumped on board. And now it's
harder to correct the bad medicine because of the sponsors.

Is that the story?

It's sort of. The diagnostic threshold was set deliberatly too high to
diagnose most type 2s back in the 70s, I think it was, because there was
no treatment or meters for home use and there was lots of employment and
health insurance discrimination. Noble of them. Not so of those
perpetuating those ranges, though, now that we know how much damage occurs
with any fbg above 100 or post prandial above 140.

Unfortunately, this rationale has gotten lost in the years that gave us
meters and more knowledge about prevention and the drug metformin, and
lots of folks develop advanced diabetic complications while still running
blood glucose in the "pre-diabetic" range. I'm talking peripheral
neuropathies, nephropathy and retinopathies, along with autonomic
neuropathies.

Those sponsors don't want us eating in a way that keeps us in normal
healthy ranges of bg; it means doing without all or most of their
products, except for generic metformin.

See phlaunt.com/diabetes

Susan
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Susan
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 2:06 am    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

x-no-archive: yes

Jim Chinnis wrote:

Quote:
I don't know the history, but I assume the bad medical advice came first.
Then the "sponsors" saw a good thing and jumped on board. And now it's
harder to correct the bad medicine because of the sponsors.

Is that the story?

It's sort of. The diagnostic threshold was set deliberatly too high to
diagnose most type 2s back in the 70s, I think it was, because there was
no treatment or meters for home use and there was lots of employment and
health insurance discrimination. Noble of them. Not so of those
perpetuating those ranges, though, now that we know how much damage
occurs with any fbg above 100 or post prandial above 140.

Unfortunately, this rationale has gotten lost in the years that gave
us meters and more knowledge about prevention and the drug metformin,
and lots of folks develop advanced diabetic complications while still
running blood glucose in the "pre-diabetic" range. I'm talking
peripheral neuropathies, nephropathy and retinopathies, along with
autonomic neuropathies.

Those sponsors don't want us eating in a way that keeps us in normal
healthy ranges of bg; it means doing without all or most of their
products, except for generic metformin.

See phlaunt.com/diabetes

Susan
Back to top
Jim Chinnis
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 1030

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 10:31 pm    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

Susan <nevermind@nomail.com> wrote in part:

Quote:
x-no-archive: yes

Jim Chinnis wrote:
Susan <nevermind@nomail.com> wrote in part:


An obese patient with type 2 diabetes whose diet was changed from
the recommended high-carbohydrate, low-fat type to a low-carbohydrate diet
showed a significant reduction in bodyweight, improved glycemic control and
a reversal of a six year long decline of renal function.


"the RECOMMENDED high-carbohydrate, low-fat type"

Yow.

Yes, the ADA recommends up to 10% of calories from added sugars, and
total of 55% of calories from carbs, and the web site says "eat more
starches, they're good for you!!"

No surprise to note their biggest sponsors are grain, sugar and drug
producers.

I don't know the history, but I assume the bad medical advice came first.
Then the "sponsors" saw a good thing and jumped on board. And now it's
harder to correct the bad medicine because of the sponsors.

Is that the story?
--
Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA
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nospam7@heartmdphd.com
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 27 Dec 2005
Posts: 470

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 5:25 am    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

Susan wrote:
Quote:
x-no-archive: yes
Jim Chinnis wrote:
Susan <nevermind@nomail.com> wrote in part:

An obese patient with type 2 diabetes whose diet was changed from
the recommended high-carbohydrate, low-fat type to a low-carbohydrate diet
showed a significant reduction in bodyweight, improved glycemic control and
a reversal of a six year long decline of renal function.

"the RECOMMENDED high-carbohydrate, low-fat type"

Yow.

Yes, the ADA recommends up to 10% of calories from added sugars, and
total of 55% of calories from carbs, and the web site says "eat more
starches, they're good for you!!"

Far wiser would be variety with a balanced intake of the macronutrients
(equal percentages of each) **and** much less intake (less than 32
ounces of food per day).

Prayerfully in Christ's amazing love,

Prayerfully in Christ's amazing love,

Andrew B.Chung
Cardiologist, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
http://HeartMDPhD.com/TheLife
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Susan
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 1:01 am    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

x-no-archive: yes

Jim Chinnis wrote:
Quote:
Susan <nevermind@nomail.com> wrote in part:


An obese patient with type 2 diabetes whose diet was changed from
the recommended high-carbohydrate, low-fat type to a low-carbohydrate diet
showed a significant reduction in bodyweight, improved glycemic control and
a reversal of a six year long decline of renal function.


"the RECOMMENDED high-carbohydrate, low-fat type"

Yow.

Yes, the ADA recommends up to 10% of calories from added sugars, and
total of 55% of calories from carbs, and the web site says "eat more
starches, they're good for you!!"

No surprise to note their biggest sponsors are grain, sugar and drug
producers.

Susan
Back to top
Jim Chinnis
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 1030

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 12:45 am    Post subject: Re: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

Susan <nevermind@nomail.com> wrote in part:

Quote:
An obese patient with type 2 diabetes whose diet was changed from
the recommended high-carbohydrate, low-fat type to a low-carbohydrate diet
showed a significant reduction in bodyweight, improved glycemic control and
a reversal of a six year long decline of renal function.

"the RECOMMENDED high-carbohydrate, low-fat type"

Yow.
--
Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA
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Susan
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 932

PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 12:32 am    Post subject: Low carbohydrate diet for glycemic and lipidemia control Reply with quote

x-no-archive: yes

Nutr Metab (Lond). 2006 Jun 14;3(1):22
Low-carbohydrate diet in type 2 diabetes. Stable improvement of bodyweight
and glycaemic control during 22 months follow-up.
Nielsen JV, Joensson EA.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Low-carbohydrate diets in the management of obese
patients with type 2 diabetes seem intuitively attractive due to their
potent antihyperglycemic effect. We previously reported that a 20 %
carbohydrate diet was significantly superior to a 55-60 % carbohydrate diet
with regard to bodyweight and glycemic control in 2 non-randomised
groups of
obese diabetes patients observed closely over 6 months. The effect beyond 6
months of reduced carbohydrate has not been previously reported. The
objective of the present study, therefore, was to determine to what degree
the changes among the 16 patients in the low-carbohydrate diet group at
6-months were preserved or changed 22 months after start, even without
close
follow-up. In addition, we report that, after the 6 month observation
period, two thirds of the patients in the high-carbohydrate changed their
diet. This group also showed improvement in bodyweight and glycemic
control.
METHOD: Retrospective follow-up of previously studied subjects on a low
carbohydrate diet. RESULTS: The mean bodyweight at the start of the initial
study was 100.6+/-14.7 kg. At six months it was 89.2+/- 14.3 kg. From 6 to
22 months, mean bodyweight had increased by 2.7+/- 4.2 kg to an average of
92.0 ± 14.0 kg. Seven of the 16 patients (44%) retained the same
bodyweight from 6 to 22 months or reduced it further; all but one had lower
weight at 22 months than at the beginning. Initial mean HbA1c was 8.0 ±
1.5 %. After 6 and 12 months it was 6.6 ±1.0 % and 7.0 ±1.3 %,
respectively. At 22 months, it was still 6.9 ± 1.1 % . CONCLUSION: Advice
on a 20 % carbohydrate diet with some caloric restriction to obese patients
with type 2 diabetes has lasting effect on bodyweight and glycemic control.

PMID: 16774674





Nutr Metab (Lond). 2006 Jun 14;3(1):23
A low-carbohydrate diet may prevent end-stage renal failure in type 2
diabetes. A case report.
Nielsen JV, Westerlund P, Bygren PG.

ABSTRACT: An obese patient with type 2 diabetes whose diet was changed from
the recommended high-carbohydrate, low-fat type to a low-carbohydrate diet
showed a significant reduction in bodyweight, improved glycemic control and
a reversal of a six year long decline of renal function. The reversal of
the
renal function was likely caused by both improved glycemic control and
elimination of the patients obesity. Insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes
patients usually leads to weight increase which may cause further injury to
the kidney. Although other unknown metabolic mechanisms cannot be excluded,
it is likely that the obesity caused by the combination of
high-carbohydrate
diet and insulin in this case contributed to the patients deteriorating
kidney function. In such patients, where control of bodyweight and
hyperglycemia is vital, a trial with a low-carbohydrate diet may be
appropriate to avoid the risk of adding obesity-associated renal failure to
already failing kidneys.

PMID: 16774676


Nutr Metab (Lond). 2006 Jun 21;3(1):24
Low carbohydrate diets improve atherogenic dyslipidemia even in the absence
of weight loss.
Feinman RD, Volek JS.

ABSTRACT: Because of its effect on insulin, carbohydrate restriction is one
of the obvious dietary choices for weight reduction and diabetes. Such
interventions generally lead to higher levels of dietary fat than official
recommendations and have long been criticized because of potential effects
on cardiovascular risk although many literature reports have shown that
they
are actually protective even in the absence of weight loss. A recent report
of Krauss et al. (AJCN, 2006) separates the effects of weight loss and
carbohydrate restriction. They clearly confirm that carbohydrate
restriction
leads to an improvement in atherogenic lipid states in the absence of
weight
loss or in the presence of higher saturated fat. In distinction, low fat
diets seem to require weight loss for effective improvement in atherogenic
dyslipidemia.

PMID: 16790045
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