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Can breathing pattern effect blood flow?
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Kumar
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 870

PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 3:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

Doc John wrote:
Quote:
kumar wrote:
Doc John wrote:
kumar wrote:

Rapid and deep

Rapid and shallow

Slow

Holding the breath

Deep breathing is a part of the Wellness movement. While often made
fun of by scientists, it actually happens to be a matter of basic human
physiology.

The sympathetic nervous system connects breathing patterns to your
pulse rate and blood pressure. Change one and you will automatically
change the other. This is basic human physiology, NOT magic.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"# EXPLANATION OF THE MOST LIKELY PHYSICAL MECHANISM OF ACTION FOR DEEP
BREATHING: "The linkage between vagal baroreflex impairment and
mortality may partially reflect patients' autonomic responses to
cardiac rhythm changes. ... the body's modulatory processes (eg, the
well-known modulation of BP [blood pressure] changes by baroreflex
activity), through which vagal as well as sympathetic reflexes may be
controlled. ... Thus, vagal cardiac and pulmonary mechanisms are
linked, and there are reasons to expect that improvements in one vagal
limb might spill over into the other. ... We suggest that chronic
biofeedback-induced increases in baroreflex gain, which, to our
knowledge, has not previously been reported, reflects neuroplasticity
[i.e., nerves that are capable of growing or developing]."[10]"

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"Baroreflex sensitivity can be enhanced significantly by slow
breathing, both in health and in the presence of CHF [chronic heart
failure]. This seems to occur through a relative increase in vagal
activity and a reduction in sympathetic activity, as could be argued by
the small reduction in heart rate observed during slow breathing and by
the reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures."[2]

"Several studies ... showed that 15 minutes of daily breathing exercise
lowered BP [Blood Pressure] within 8 weeks by 12.1/6.1 mmHg as compared
to 7.6q3.4 mmHg in the control group."[6]

"Slow breathing at 6 breaths/minute increases baroreflex sensitivity
and reduces sympathetic activity ... suggesting a potentially
beneficial effect in hypertension. ... Slow breathing decreased
systolic and diastolic pressures in hypertensive subjects ... Slow
breathing reduces blood pressure and enhances baroreflex sensitivity in
hypertensive patients."[5]
Ergo, my response which I made a while back did in fact answer most
your questions.

The information is all over the place in PubMedd. But, in order to
find it you have to think like a Geek.

Further:
http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"# Breaths per minute, respiration rate, or rate of breathing:

* Slow breathing
o 6 or 5 breaths/minute[2]
o "Slow, rhythmic, and deep breathing"[4]
o "There was a significant decrease in basal heart rate in
slow breathing group after three months of practice of slow breathing
exercise."[1]
o "produced a significant increase in respiratory pressures
and respiratory endurance."[4]
o "Heart rate, rate-pressure product and double product
decreased."[4]
o Slow breathing is the healthiest method of deep breathing.
* Spontaneous, or normal uncontrolled, breathing
o 15 breaths/minute[2]
* Fast breathing
o 20 breaths or more/minute, such as the Lamaze childbirth
rapid panting method.
o "Bellows-type rapid and deep breathing"[4]
o "Heart rate, rate-pressure product ... increased
significantly."[4]
o All Fast/Rapid breathing techniques should be avoided.
Yogic rapid breathing rates can get extremely high and might result in
hyperventilation. Also, the research indicates that rapid breathing
negatively affects your heart."
--
Doc John

Doc John,

Thanks for informations.

You tried to link breathing pattern with Baroreflex sensitivity or with
nervous system. There can be other channel as metabolic, humrol,
myogenic etc. which can also BP.

How can you link breathing pattern changing O2 and CO2 levels and
effecting BP in view of this aspect also from physiology book:-

"Oxygen is important not only for acute but also long term control of
local blood flow."

Well, obviously that particular question has nothing to do with my web
page.

Nevertheless, all you have to is research it in PubMed just like any
other question.

I was able to quickly turn up these 4 full text research studies that
are available online for free, 2 on each factor or changing O2 and CO2
levels. There are a lot more available.

"Administering supplemental oxygen to patients undergoing cardiac
catheterization substantially increases coronary vascular resistance by
a mechanism that may involve oxidative quenching of NO within the
coronary microcirculation. ... These results suggest that hyperoxia is
a potent vasoconstrictor stimulus to the coronary circulation that
functions at the level of microvascular resistance vessels."
http://ajpheart.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/288/3/H1057

"There are local metabolic feedback and sympathetic feedforward control
mechanisms that match coronary blood flow to myocardial oxygen
consumption. Despite intensive research the local feedback control
mechanism remains unknown."
http://jap.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/97/1/404

"Pulmonary NO synthase inhibition and inspired CO2: effects on V'/Q'
and pulmonary blood flow distribution."
http://erj.ersjournals.com/cgi/reprint/16/2/288

"Effects of defibrination on hemorheology, cerebral blood flow
velocity, and CO2 reactivity during hypocapnia in normal subjects. ...
The increase in MCA blood flow velocity was associated with improved
CO2 reactivity and reduced blood viscosity after defibrination. The
data may suggest that defibrination increases cerebral blood flow by
reducing blood viscosity."
http://stroke.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/27/8/1328

Thanks. Btw have you any idea how excess nutrients can be harmful to
cells if diffused in excess to interstitial compartments? Whether body
local blood flow mechnism try to restrict these to avoid toxicities to
target cells by decreasing the physical size and numbers of arteries
supplying to tissues? If yes, will such mechnism increase BP in
upstream arteries and overall BP?
Back to top
Mr-Natural-Health
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 01 May 2005
Posts: 1807

PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 1:57 pm    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

kumar wrote:
Quote:
Doc John wrote:
kumar wrote:

Rapid and deep

Rapid and shallow

Slow

Holding the breath

Deep breathing is a part of the Wellness movement. While often made
fun of by scientists, it actually happens to be a matter of basic human
physiology.

The sympathetic nervous system connects breathing patterns to your
pulse rate and blood pressure. Change one and you will automatically
change the other. This is basic human physiology, NOT magic.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"# EXPLANATION OF THE MOST LIKELY PHYSICAL MECHANISM OF ACTION FOR DEEP
BREATHING: "The linkage between vagal baroreflex impairment and
mortality may partially reflect patients' autonomic responses to
cardiac rhythm changes. ... the body's modulatory processes (eg, the
well-known modulation of BP [blood pressure] changes by baroreflex
activity), through which vagal as well as sympathetic reflexes may be
controlled. ... Thus, vagal cardiac and pulmonary mechanisms are
linked, and there are reasons to expect that improvements in one vagal
limb might spill over into the other. ... We suggest that chronic
biofeedback-induced increases in baroreflex gain, which, to our
knowledge, has not previously been reported, reflects neuroplasticity
[i.e., nerves that are capable of growing or developing]."[10]"

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"Baroreflex sensitivity can be enhanced significantly by slow
breathing, both in health and in the presence of CHF [chronic heart
failure]. This seems to occur through a relative increase in vagal
activity and a reduction in sympathetic activity, as could be argued by
the small reduction in heart rate observed during slow breathing and by
the reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures."[2]

"Several studies ... showed that 15 minutes of daily breathing exercise
lowered BP [Blood Pressure] within 8 weeks by 12.1/6.1 mmHg as compared
to 7.6q3.4 mmHg in the control group."[6]

"Slow breathing at 6 breaths/minute increases baroreflex sensitivity
and reduces sympathetic activity ... suggesting a potentially
beneficial effect in hypertension. ... Slow breathing decreased
systolic and diastolic pressures in hypertensive subjects ... Slow
breathing reduces blood pressure and enhances baroreflex sensitivity in
hypertensive patients."[5]
Ergo, my response which I made a while back did in fact answer most
your questions.

The information is all over the place in PubMedd. But, in order to
find it you have to think like a Geek.

Further:
http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"# Breaths per minute, respiration rate, or rate of breathing:

* Slow breathing
o 6 or 5 breaths/minute[2]
o "Slow, rhythmic, and deep breathing"[4]
o "There was a significant decrease in basal heart rate in
slow breathing group after three months of practice of slow breathing
exercise."[1]
o "produced a significant increase in respiratory pressures
and respiratory endurance."[4]
o "Heart rate, rate-pressure product and double product
decreased."[4]
o Slow breathing is the healthiest method of deep breathing.
* Spontaneous, or normal uncontrolled, breathing
o 15 breaths/minute[2]
* Fast breathing
o 20 breaths or more/minute, such as the Lamaze childbirth
rapid panting method.
o "Bellows-type rapid and deep breathing"[4]
o "Heart rate, rate-pressure product ... increased
significantly."[4]
o All Fast/Rapid breathing techniques should be avoided.
Yogic rapid breathing rates can get extremely high and might result in
hyperventilation. Also, the research indicates that rapid breathing
negatively affects your heart."
--
Doc John

Doc John,

Thanks for informations.

You tried to link breathing pattern with Baroreflex sensitivity or with
nervous system. There can be other channel as metabolic, humrol,
myogenic etc. which can also BP.

How can you link breathing pattern changing O2 and CO2 levels and
effecting BP in view of this aspect also from physiology book:-

"Oxygen is important not only for acute but also long term control of
local blood flow."

Well, obviously that particular question has nothing to do with my web
page.

Nevertheless, all you have to is research it in PubMed just like any
other question.

I was able to quickly turn up these 4 full text research studies that
are available online for free, 2 on each factor or changing O2 and CO2
levels. There are a lot more available.

"Administering supplemental oxygen to patients undergoing cardiac
catheterization substantially increases coronary vascular resistance by
a mechanism that may involve oxidative quenching of NO within the
coronary microcirculation. ... These results suggest that hyperoxia is
a potent vasoconstrictor stimulus to the coronary circulation that
functions at the level of microvascular resistance vessels."
http://ajpheart.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/288/3/H1057

"There are local metabolic feedback and sympathetic feedforward control
mechanisms that match coronary blood flow to myocardial oxygen
consumption. Despite intensive research the local feedback control
mechanism remains unknown."
http://jap.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/97/1/404

"Pulmonary NO synthase inhibition and inspired CO2: effects on V'/Q'
and pulmonary blood flow distribution."
http://erj.ersjournals.com/cgi/reprint/16/2/288

"Effects of defibrination on hemorheology, cerebral blood flow
velocity, and CO2 reactivity during hypocapnia in normal subjects. ...
The increase in MCA blood flow velocity was associated with improved
CO2 reactivity and reduced blood viscosity after defibrination. The
data may suggest that defibrination increases cerebral blood flow by
reducing blood viscosity."
http://stroke.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/27/8/1328
Back to top
Kumar
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 870

PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 1:19 am    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

Doc John wrote:
Quote:
kumar wrote:

Rapid and deep

Rapid and shallow

Slow

Holding the breath

Deep breathing is a part of the Wellness movement. While often made
fun of by scientists, it actually happens to be a matter of basic human
physiology.

The sympathetic nervous system connects breathing patterns to your
pulse rate and blood pressure. Change one and you will automatically
change the other. This is basic human physiology, NOT magic.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"# EXPLANATION OF THE MOST LIKELY PHYSICAL MECHANISM OF ACTION FOR DEEP
BREATHING: "The linkage between vagal baroreflex impairment and
mortality may partially reflect patients' autonomic responses to
cardiac rhythm changes. ... the body's modulatory processes (eg, the
well-known modulation of BP [blood pressure] changes by baroreflex
activity), through which vagal as well as sympathetic reflexes may be
controlled. ... Thus, vagal cardiac and pulmonary mechanisms are
linked, and there are reasons to expect that improvements in one vagal
limb might spill over into the other. ... We suggest that chronic
biofeedback-induced increases in baroreflex gain, which, to our
knowledge, has not previously been reported, reflects neuroplasticity
[i.e., nerves that are capable of growing or developing]."[10]"

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"Baroreflex sensitivity can be enhanced significantly by slow
breathing, both in health and in the presence of CHF [chronic heart
failure]. This seems to occur through a relative increase in vagal
activity and a reduction in sympathetic activity, as could be argued by
the small reduction in heart rate observed during slow breathing and by
the reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures."[2]

"Several studies ... showed that 15 minutes of daily breathing exercise
lowered BP [Blood Pressure] within 8 weeks by 12.1/6.1 mmHg as compared
to 7.6q3.4 mmHg in the control group."[6]

"Slow breathing at 6 breaths/minute increases baroreflex sensitivity
and reduces sympathetic activity ... suggesting a potentially
beneficial effect in hypertension. ... Slow breathing decreased
systolic and diastolic pressures in hypertensive subjects ... Slow
breathing reduces blood pressure and enhances baroreflex sensitivity in
hypertensive patients."[5]
Ergo, my response which I made a while back did in fact answer most
your questions.

The information is all over the place in PubMedd. But, in order to
find it you have to think like a Geek.

Further:
http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"# Breaths per minute, respiration rate, or rate of breathing:

* Slow breathing
o 6 or 5 breaths/minute[2]
o "Slow, rhythmic, and deep breathing"[4]
o "There was a significant decrease in basal heart rate in
slow breathing group after three months of practice of slow breathing
exercise."[1]
o "produced a significant increase in respiratory pressures
and respiratory endurance."[4]
o "Heart rate, rate-pressure product and double product
decreased."[4]
o Slow breathing is the healthiest method of deep breathing.
* Spontaneous, or normal uncontrolled, breathing
o 15 breaths/minute[2]
* Fast breathing
o 20 breaths or more/minute, such as the Lamaze childbirth
rapid panting method.
o "Bellows-type rapid and deep breathing"[4]
o "Heart rate, rate-pressure product ... increased
significantly."[4]
o All Fast/Rapid breathing techniques should be avoided.
Yogic rapid breathing rates can get extremely high and might result in
hyperventilation. Also, the research indicates that rapid breathing
negatively affects your heart."
--
Doc John

Doc John,

Thanks for informations.

You tried to link breathing pattern with Baroreflex sensitivity or with
nervous system. There can be other channel as metabolic, humrol,
myogenic etc. which can also BP.

How can you link breathing pattern changing O2 and CO2 levels and
effecting BP in view of this aspect also from physiology book:-

"Oxygen is important not only for acute but also long term control of
local blood flow."
Back to top
Mr-Natural-Health
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 01 May 2005
Posts: 1807

PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 1:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

kumar wrote:

Quote:
Rapid and deep

Rapid and shallow

Slow

Holding the breath

Deep breathing is a part of the Wellness movement. While often made
fun of by scientists, it actually happens to be a matter of basic human
physiology.

The sympathetic nervous system connects breathing patterns to your
pulse rate and blood pressure. Change one and you will automatically
change the other. This is basic human physiology, NOT magic.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"# EXPLANATION OF THE MOST LIKELY PHYSICAL MECHANISM OF ACTION FOR DEEP
BREATHING: "The linkage between vagal baroreflex impairment and
mortality may partially reflect patients' autonomic responses to
cardiac rhythm changes. ... the body's modulatory processes (eg, the
well-known modulation of BP [blood pressure] changes by baroreflex
activity), through which vagal as well as sympathetic reflexes may be
controlled. ... Thus, vagal cardiac and pulmonary mechanisms are
linked, and there are reasons to expect that improvements in one vagal
limb might spill over into the other. ... We suggest that chronic
biofeedback-induced increases in baroreflex gain, which, to our
knowledge, has not previously been reported, reflects neuroplasticity
[i.e., nerves that are capable of growing or developing]."[10]"

Quote:
In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"Baroreflex sensitivity can be enhanced significantly by slow
breathing, both in health and in the presence of CHF [chronic heart
failure]. This seems to occur through a relative increase in vagal
activity and a reduction in sympathetic activity, as could be argued by
the small reduction in heart rate observed during slow breathing and by
the reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures."[2]

"Several studies ... showed that 15 minutes of daily breathing exercise
lowered BP [Blood Pressure] within 8 weeks by 12.1/6.1 mmHg as compared
to 7.6q3.4 mmHg in the control group."[6]

"Slow breathing at 6 breaths/minute increases baroreflex sensitivity
and reduces sympathetic activity ... suggesting a potentially
beneficial effect in hypertension. ... Slow breathing decreased
systolic and diastolic pressures in hypertensive subjects ... Slow
breathing reduces blood pressure and enhances baroreflex sensitivity in
hypertensive patients."[5]
Ergo, my response which I made a while back did in fact answer most
your questions.

The information is all over the place in PubMedd. But, in order to
find it you have to think like a Geek.

Further:
http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
"# Breaths per minute, respiration rate, or rate of breathing:

* Slow breathing
o 6 or 5 breaths/minute[2]
o "Slow, rhythmic, and deep breathing"[4]
o "There was a significant decrease in basal heart rate in
slow breathing group after three months of practice of slow breathing
exercise."[1]
o "produced a significant increase in respiratory pressures
and respiratory endurance."[4]
o "Heart rate, rate-pressure product and double product
decreased."[4]
o Slow breathing is the healthiest method of deep breathing.
* Spontaneous, or normal uncontrolled, breathing
o 15 breaths/minute[2]
* Fast breathing
o 20 breaths or more/minute, such as the Lamaze childbirth
rapid panting method.
o "Bellows-type rapid and deep breathing"[4]
o "Heart rate, rate-pressure product ... increased
significantly."[4]
o All Fast/Rapid breathing techniques should be avoided.
Yogic rapid breathing rates can get extremely high and might result in
hyperventilation. Also, the research indicates that rapid breathing
negatively affects your heart."
--
Doc John
Back to top
Kumar
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 870

PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2006 7:40 am    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

Doc John wrote:
Quote:
kumar wrote:
Comax wrote:
kumar wrote:
johngohde@naturalhealthperspective.com wrote:
kumar wrote:

Slow

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

The scientific basis to this is in fact well established.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html

Yes, thanks. But I think science of effects by breathing pattern
changes is not mentioned very clearly. Moreover, how much we consider
such effects in treatments, drug's effect and understanding the
diseases? Probably, diabetes type2 may have some link with it as I
indicated in my other topic under discussion here.

You'll find a very clear message if you read "The Cure of High Blood
Pressure by Respiratory Exercises" now available in e-book format on
www.cureofhighbloodpressure.com. Some of the information and the
results of case studies are absolutely amazing.

Good Health

Comax

Yes, it should be intresting. But I have one doubt.

Deep and rapid breath may mean more O2 and less CO2 in system.

Why are you academics so bloody stupid and mentally slow?

Rapid breath is NOT used to lower blood pressure. My web page which
you totally ignored points this out.

The facts are that you don't have a clue as to what you are talking
about. You have not read the literature on the subject. And, you are
just plain mentally slow.

Who says so? I do. Who else would, if I don't?

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
..

Sorry, you lost patience bit early. I indicated:" it is indicative that
more O2 promote more vasculature in short term but can decrease it on
prolonged its excessive concentration" a decrease in size and number of
arteries, may cause increase in pressure. More O2 concentration or less
CO2 may cause such effect whereas less O2 and more CO2 can cause
vasodialating or increase in size and numbers of arteries or relaxing
effect resulting into lowering of BP.
Back to top
Mr-Natural-Health
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 01 May 2005
Posts: 1807

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 11:12 am    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

kumar wrote:
Quote:
Comax wrote:
kumar wrote:
johngohde@naturalhealthperspective.com wrote:
kumar wrote:

Slow

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

The scientific basis to this is in fact well established.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html

Yes, thanks. But I think science of effects by breathing pattern
changes is not mentioned very clearly. Moreover, how much we consider
such effects in treatments, drug's effect and understanding the
diseases? Probably, diabetes type2 may have some link with it as I
indicated in my other topic under discussion here.

You'll find a very clear message if you read "The Cure of High Blood
Pressure by Respiratory Exercises" now available in e-book format on
www.cureofhighbloodpressure.com. Some of the information and the
results of case studies are absolutely amazing.

Good Health

Comax

Yes, it should be intresting. But I have one doubt.

Deep and rapid breath may mean more O2 and less CO2 in system.

Why are you academics so bloody stupid and mentally slow?

Rapid breath is NOT used to lower blood pressure. My web page which
you totally ignored points this out.

The facts are that you don't have a clue as to what you are talking
about. You have not read the literature on the subject. And, you are
just plain mentally slow.

Who says so? I do. Who else would, if I don't?

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
Back to top
Kumar
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 870

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 10:00 am    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

Comax wrote:
Quote:
kumar wrote:
johngohde@naturalhealthperspective.com wrote:
kumar wrote:

Slow

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

The scientific basis to this is in fact well established.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html

Yes, thanks. But I think science of effects by breathing pattern
changes is not mentioned very clearly. Moreover, how much we consider
such effects in treatments, drug's effect and understanding the
diseases? Probably, diabetes type2 may have some link with it as I
indicated in my other topic under discussion here.

You'll find a very clear message if you read "The Cure of High Blood
Pressure by Respiratory Exercises" now available in e-book format on
www.cureofhighbloodpressure.com. Some of the information and the
results of case studies are absolutely amazing.

Good Health

Comax

Yes, it should be intresting. But I have one doubt.

Deep and rapid breath may mean more O2 and less CO2 in system. I think
it is indicative that more O2 promote more vasculature in short term
but can decrease it on prolonged its excessive concentration. How such
decrease in size and numbers of arteries--as long term local blood flow
control will effect blood presuure in need to be understood. Can anyone
explain such effect?

Furthur, while moving into polluted parts of modern cities, we may be
breathing shallow and slow? If we put some cloths on nose or move to
some lesser polluted part or to remote area, we may experiance deep and
rapid breathing pattern. How it can effect us?
Back to top
Comax
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 9:15 am    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

kumar wrote:
Quote:
johngohde@naturalhealthperspective.com wrote:
kumar wrote:

Slow

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

The scientific basis to this is in fact well established.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html

Yes, thanks. But I think science of effects by breathing pattern
changes is not mentioned very clearly. Moreover, how much we consider
such effects in treatments, drug's effect and understanding the
diseases? Probably, diabetes type2 may have some link with it as I
indicated in my other topic under discussion here.

You'll find a very clear message if you read "The Cure of High Blood
Pressure by Respiratory Exercises" now available in e-book format on
www.cureofhighbloodpressure.com. Some of the information and the
results of case studies are absolutely amazing.

Good Health

Comax
Back to top
Comax
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 9:15 am    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

kumar wrote:
Quote:
johngohde@naturalhealthperspective.com wrote:
kumar wrote:

Slow

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

The scientific basis to this is in fact well established.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html

Yes, thanks. But I think science of effects by breathing pattern
changes is not mentioned very clearly. Moreover, how much we consider
such effects in treatments, drug's effect and understanding the
diseases? Probably, diabetes type2 may have some link with it as I
indicated in my other topic under discussion here.

You'll find a very clear message if you read "The Cure of High Blood
Pressure by Respiratory Exercises" now available in e-book format on
www.cureofhighbloodpressure.com. Some of the information and the
results of case studies are absolutely amazing.

Good Health

Comax
Back to top
Kumar
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 870

PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 1:58 pm    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

johngohde@naturalhealthperspective.com wrote:
Quote:
kumar wrote:

Slow

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

The scientific basis to this is in fact well established.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html

Yes, thanks. But I think science of effects by breathing pattern
changes is not mentioned very clearly. Moreover, how much we consider
such effects in treatments, drug's effect and understanding the
diseases? Probably, diabetes type2 may have some link with it as I
indicated in my other topic under discussion here.
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Mr-Natural-Health
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 01 May 2005
Posts: 1807

PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 11:03 am    Post subject: Re: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

kumar wrote:

Quote:
Slow

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

The scientific basis to this is in fact well established.

http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/deep-breathing.html
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Kumar
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 870

PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 6:25 am    Post subject: Can breathing pattern effect blood flow? Reply with quote

Hello,

To add from "Text book of Medical physiology by Guyton & Hall.;-


" "Long term regulation of blood flow is esp. important when
metabolic
demands of tissue change. Thus, if a tisue become chronicallt
overactive and therefore require chronicaly increased quantity of
oxygen and other nutrients, the blood vessels usually increase within
few weeks almost to match needs of the the tissues--unless the
circulatory system has become pathological too old to repond.

The mechanism of long term local blood flow regulation is principally
to change the degree of vascularity of the tissues. For instance; if
metabolism in in a given tissue is increased for a prolonged time
vascularity increases; if the metabolism is decreased, vascularity
decreases. Thus there is reconstruction of the tissue vasculature to
meet the needs of the tissues. The reconstruction occurs rapidly(within

days) in exteremely young animals. It also occurs rapidly in new groth
tissue, such as scar tissue and cancerous tissue; however it occurs
much more slowly in old, well established tissues.

Oxygen is important not only for acute but also long term control of
local blood flow. One example of this in to increase in vascularity in
the tissues of animals that live on high altitudes, where the
atmospheric oxygen is low. A second example is that fetel chicks
hatched in low oxygen have upto twice as muchblood vessel conductivity
as is normally true. This same effect is also dramatically demonstrated

in premature human babies who are put on oxygen tents for therapeutic
purposes. The excess O2 causes almost immediate cesstion of new
vascular growth in the retina of the premature baby's eyes and even
causes degenaration of some of the capillaries that already have
formed. Then when the infant is taken out of the o2 tent, there is
explosive overgroth of new vessels to make up for the sudden decrease
in available oxygen; indeed, there is often so much overgroth that
vessels grow into the eye's vitreous humor and eventuall cause
blindness. (This condition is called "retrolental fibroplasia"). " "


It is indicated that Oxygen is important not only for acute but also
long term control of
local blood flow. We can experiance different patterns of breathing
i.e.

Rapid and deep

Rapid and shallow

Slow

Holding the breath

In view of above it looks breathing pattern--unintentional and
intentional, environmental..etc. can effect local blood flow to
tissues--vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Normal and abnormal blood
flow to tisues can be a concern of prime importance for maintaining
health and getting disorders respectively-- locally and systematically.

Pls tell your views to this effect. Can we manage blood flow changes by
changing the breathing pattern intentionally or environmently?

Best wishes.
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