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Magnesium fights range of serious ills
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vernon
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 15 Jan 2006
Posts: 405

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 7:20 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

"vernon" <there@there> wrote in message
news:445792f9$0$2979$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com...
Quote:

"Caitriona Mac Fhiodhbhuidhe" <st_brigids_gate_farm@yahoo.com> wrote in
message news:1146589350.818803.40670@i39g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

vernon wrote:
snipped
"Animals" like many humans try to "steal" what others have even if it is
not
good or not good for them.
Of course you would know that if you worked a farm very long.

But then there is the pig and chicken.


I could have sworn you were talking about the goats. They are masters
at finding ways through fences, to get to food that doesn't belong to
them.

Hugo, our black Spanish buck, has been caught a few times vertically
climbing the fence around the chick yard. We have to make sure the
chick feed is inside the brooder house so that the goats can't get to
it, as the clay in it will kill them.

Kitten


Yep, forgot about the goats, four and two legged ones.

When I was about 12, my uncle (13) and I took a fifth of bourbon and poured
it over some feed. Only chickens and goats touched it and the chickens quit
very quickly.

What else are you going to at 12 on a farm 40 miles from the closest city?
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vernon
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 15 Jan 2006
Posts: 405

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 5:12 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

"Caitriona Mac Fhiodhbhuidhe" <st_brigids_gate_farm@yahoo.com> wrote in
message news:1146589350.818803.40670@i39g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

vernon wrote:
snipped
"Animals" like many humans try to "steal" what others have even if it is
not
good or not good for them.
Of course you would know that if you worked a farm very long.

But then there is the pig and chicken.


I could have sworn you were talking about the goats. They are masters
at finding ways through fences, to get to food that doesn't belong to
them.

Hugo, our black Spanish buck, has been caught a few times vertically
climbing the fence around the chick yard. We have to make sure the
chick feed is inside the brooder house so that the goats can't get to
it, as the clay in it will kill them.

Kitten


Yep, forgot about the goats, four and two legged ones.
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st_brigids_gate_farm@yaho
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 5:02 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

vernon wrote:
Quote:
snipped
"Animals" like many humans try to "steal" what others have even if it is not
good or not good for them.
Of course you would know that if you worked a farm very long.

But then there is the pig and chicken.


I could have sworn you were talking about the goats. They are masters
at finding ways through fences, to get to food that doesn't belong to
them.

Hugo, our black Spanish buck, has been caught a few times vertically
climbing the fence around the chick yard. We have to make sure the
chick feed is inside the brooder house so that the goats can't get to
it, as the clay in it will kill them.

Kitten
Back to top
vernon
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 15 Jan 2006
Posts: 405

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 4:39 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

"Caitriona Mac Fhiodhbhuidhe" <st_brigids_gate_farm@yahoo.com> wrote in
message news:1146587086.635215.289750@e56g2000cwe.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

PeterB wrote:
st_brigids_gate_farm@yahoo.com wrote:
PeterB wrote:
snipped

I agree. Low fat was a solution to a problem that never existed
(unless puking has an RDA)


I thought low fat was the solution to the problem created by
homogenizing milk.

First, we have no genes expressed for metabolization of extraspecies
dairy because 99% of our ancestors had no exposure to it. Second,
lactose intolerance (or even higher cholesterol resulting from whole
fat milk) may be just the most obvious indicators that dairy is
problematic. Long-term disease response usually develops without
warning. Some research shows that even those with high-range normal
glucose response are at greater risk of heart disease, without being
classified as diabetic.


Is there any research addressing these issues when unpasteurized,
non-homogenized milk is used? Or are all the studies with pasteurized
and homogenized milk?

Man is the only animal that consumes milk
after being weaned from the mother.


LOL... you've never lived on a farm, have you? It's interesting
watching grown animals attempting to "steal" milk from nursing mommas.

Kitten


"Animals" like many humans try to "steal" what others have even if it is not
good or not good for them.
Of course you would know that if you worked a farm very long.

But then there is the pig and chicken.
Back to top
st_brigids_gate_farm@yaho
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 4:24 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

PeterB wrote:
Quote:
st_brigids_gate_farm@yahoo.com wrote:
PeterB wrote:
snipped

I agree. Low fat was a solution to a problem that never existed
(unless puking has an RDA)


I thought low fat was the solution to the problem created by
homogenizing milk.

First, we have no genes expressed for metabolization of extraspecies
dairy because 99% of our ancestors had no exposure to it. Second,
lactose intolerance (or even higher cholesterol resulting from whole
fat milk) may be just the most obvious indicators that dairy is
problematic. Long-term disease response usually develops without
warning. Some research shows that even those with high-range normal
glucose response are at greater risk of heart disease, without being
classified as diabetic.


Is there any research addressing these issues when unpasteurized,
non-homogenized milk is used? Or are all the studies with pasteurized
and homogenized milk?

Quote:
Man is the only animal that consumes milk
after being weaned from the mother.


LOL... you've never lived on a farm, have you? It's interesting
watching grown animals attempting to "steal" milk from nursing mommas.

Kitten
Back to top
vernon
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 15 Jan 2006
Posts: 405

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 4:17 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

"PeterB" <pkm@mytrashmail.com> wrote in message
news:1146576962.749836.117240@j73g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

st_brigids_gate_farm@yahoo.com wrote:
PeterB wrote:
snipped

I agree. Low fat was a solution to a problem that never existed
(unless puking has an RDA)


I thought low fat was the solution to the problem created by
homogenizing milk.

First, we have no genes expressed for metabolization of extraspecies
dairy because 99% of our ancestors had no exposure to it.

There is ample observation to the casual observer that excess ice cream
alters one's jeans.
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Fuck Google
medicine forum addict


Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 94

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 2:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

Roman Bystrianyk <rbystrianyk@gmail.comFrom Stuart Hyderman who also claims
to be a chiropractor wrote in message:
Stuart hydernan hyderman stuart
Quote:
wrote in message
news:1146486945.931025.26920@e56g2000cwe.googlegroups.com...
Dr. W. Gifford-Jones, "Magnesium fights range of serious ills", Star
Phoenix, April 29, 2006,
Link:

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/weekend_extra/story.html?id=

7e9bedf0-2513-4413-b34a-0881216c0cb6
Quote:

A healthy 18-year-old basketball player and health-conscious jogger
recently left this world all of a sudden. Why?

An initial diagnosis was death from coronary artery disease due to high
blood cholesterol. However, the cause of death eventually proved to be
magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium has never been a super-star nutrient like calcium. But it's
still crucial in keeping the undertaker away and in fighting several
common chronic diseases.

So are you getting enough of this mineral?

Magnesium is nature's natural antispasmodic and it's amazing this fact
hasn't triggered more attention from the medical community.

In 1979. Dr. J.R. Chipperfield reported in the British Journal Lancet
that patients who suffered from angina often had low levels of blood
magnesium and that this nutrient could ease spasm and pain.

More important, magnesium can prevent sudden death.

Regular beating of the heart is controlled by an extremely complex
electrical mechanism. Low magnesium levels toss a monkey-wrench into
this process, causing an abnormal rhythm called ventricular
fibrillation. Death often results.

Magnesium also adds oil to the blood, helping to prevent sudden death
in another way. Adequate amounts of magnesium decrease the risk that
blood platelets will stick together forming a fatal blood clot. This is
important for those with risk factors for heart attack such as obesity,
diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. The lack of magnesium helps
to explain why 50 per cent of people who die of a heart attack have
normal blood cholesterol.

Now researchers have discovered that magnesium assists in the fight
against one of this nation's biggest killers, diabetes. Today 95 per
cent of diabetes is due to obesity. The exhausted pancreas fails to
produce sufficient amounts of insulin to control the amount of sugar
(glucose) in the blood. To make matters worse for obese patients,
"insulin resistance" develops. Then insulin becomes less effective in
clearing the blood of glucose.

Dr. Jerry Nadler, chief of endocrinology and metabolism at the
University of Virginia, reports that a low dietary intake of magnesium
can also encourage insulin resistance.

In his study, Nadler placed patients on a magnesium-deficient diet for
a mere three weeks. This showed that their cells not only became
deficient in magnesium, but also that insulin became less capable of
transporting glucose from the blood into cells.

Nadler's message was quite clear: "You can cause insulin resistance in
people who do not have diabetes. Just deprive them of magnesium."

Another huge study has demonstrated the importance of magnesium. Since
1976, Harvard University has followed the health of 85,000 nurses and
since 1986, another 43,000 men. Both studies concluded that that there
was a significant relationship between magnesium intake and the risk of
developing diabetes.

In the Nurses Health Study, for instance, researchers found that women
consuming 220 milligrams (mg) of magnesium were one-third more likely
to develop diabetes during the next six years than those consuming 340
mg of magnesium daily. The message? The greater the intake of magnesium
the less likelihood of developing this disease.

Dr. Lawrence Resnick, professor of medicine and director of
hypertension, Wayne State University, studied the blood pressure of
patients who were both diabetic and non-diabetic. He found that all
patients with hypertension, whether diabetic or non-diabetic, had lower
magnesium levels than people with normal blood pressure.

Resnick says he has treated patients who were hypertensive in spite of
taking one or two medications to treat this disease. And that by adding
magnesium their pressure returned to normal.

So are you getting 350 milligrams (mg) of magnesium a day? A good start
would be one baked potato with skin (55 mg), half an ounce of almonds
(43 mg), one shredded wheat (40 mg), one cup of plain low fat yogurt
(43 mg), one-half cup of brown rice (42 mg), one banana (32 mg), a
three-ounce grilled salmon (28 mg), one slice of whole wheat bread (24
mg) and add more fruits and vegetables.

As well, don't forget to drink milk. Drinking two glasses of milk a day
also provides 20 per cent of the daily requirements of magnesium. Once
again we find that milk isn't just for kids.
Back to top
Fuck Google
medicine forum addict


Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 94

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 2:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

<st_brigids_gate_farm@yahoo.coFrom Stuart Hyderman who also claims to be a
chiropractor wrote in message:
Stuart hydernan hyderman stuart
m> wrote in message
news:1146489836.412293.31010@i40g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
snipped
Dr. Lawrence Resnick, professor of medicine and director of
hypertension, Wayne State University, studied the blood pressure of
patients who were both diabetic and non-diabetic. He found that all
patients with hypertension, whether diabetic or non-diabetic, had lower
magnesium levels than people with normal blood pressure.

Resnick says he has treated patients who were hypertensive in spite of
taking one or two medications to treat this disease. And that by adding
magnesium their pressure returned to normal.


This makes sense. In eastern Europe, people drink kefir to lower
hypertension.



So are you getting 350 milligrams (mg) of magnesium a day? A good start
would be one baked potato with skin (55 mg), half an ounce of almonds
(43 mg), one shredded wheat (40 mg), one cup of plain low fat yogurt
(43 mg), one-half cup of brown rice (42 mg), one banana (32 mg), a
three-ounce grilled salmon (28 mg), one slice of whole wheat bread (24
mg) and add more fruits and vegetables.

As well, don't forget to drink milk. Drinking two glasses of milk a day
also provides 20 per cent of the daily requirements of magnesium. Once
again we find that milk isn't just for kids.


Kefir is good for those who are lactose intolerant. Apparently, the
fermentation process breaks down the lactose and releases more of the
B-complex vitamins contained in the milk from which it's made.

Kitten
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Fuck Google
medicine forum addict


Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 94

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 2:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

PeterB <pkm@mytrashmail.com> wrote in messagFrom Stuart Hyderman who also
claims to be a chiropractor wrote in message:
Stuart hydernan hyderman stuart
e news:1146491469.671264.223670@j73g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
Dr. W. Gifford-Jones, "Magnesium fights range of serious ills", Star
Phoenix, April 29, 2006,
Link:

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/weekend_extra/story.html?id=

7e9bedf0-2513-4413-b34a-0881216c0cb6
Quote:

A healthy 18-year-old basketball player and health-conscious jogger
recently left this world all of a sudden. Why?

An initial diagnosis was death from coronary artery disease due to high
blood cholesterol. However, the cause of death eventually proved to be
magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium has never been a super-star nutrient like calcium. But it's
still crucial in keeping the undertaker away and in fighting several
common chronic diseases.

So are you getting enough of this mineral?

Magnesium is nature's natural antispasmodic and it's amazing this fact
hasn't triggered more attention from the medical community.

In 1979. Dr. J.R. Chipperfield reported in the British Journal Lancet
that patients who suffered from angina often had low levels of blood
magnesium and that this nutrient could ease spasm and pain.

More important, magnesium can prevent sudden death.

Regular beating of the heart is controlled by an extremely complex
electrical mechanism. Low magnesium levels toss a monkey-wrench into
this process, causing an abnormal rhythm called ventricular
fibrillation. Death often results.

Magnesium also adds oil to the blood, helping to prevent sudden death
in another way. Adequate amounts of magnesium decrease the risk that
blood platelets will stick together forming a fatal blood clot. This is
important for those with risk factors for heart attack such as obesity,
diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. The lack of magnesium helps
to explain why 50 per cent of people who die of a heart attack have
normal blood cholesterol.

Now researchers have discovered that magnesium assists in the fight
against one of this nation's biggest killers, diabetes. Today 95 per
cent of diabetes is due to obesity. The exhausted pancreas fails to
produce sufficient amounts of insulin to control the amount of sugar
(glucose) in the blood. To make matters worse for obese patients,
"insulin resistance" develops. Then insulin becomes less effective in
clearing the blood of glucose.

Dr. Jerry Nadler, chief of endocrinology and metabolism at the
University of Virginia, reports that a low dietary intake of magnesium
can also encourage insulin resistance.

In his study, Nadler placed patients on a magnesium-deficient diet for
a mere three weeks. This showed that their cells not only became
deficient in magnesium, but also that insulin became less capable of
transporting glucose from the blood into cells.

Nadler's message was quite clear: "You can cause insulin resistance in
people who do not have diabetes. Just deprive them of magnesium."

Another huge study has demonstrated the importance of magnesium. Since
1976, Harvard University has followed the health of 85,000 nurses and
since 1986, another 43,000 men. Both studies concluded that that there
was a significant relationship between magnesium intake and the risk of
developing diabetes.

In the Nurses Health Study, for instance, researchers found that women
consuming 220 milligrams (mg) of magnesium were one-third more likely
to develop diabetes during the next six years than those consuming 340
mg of magnesium daily. The message? The greater the intake of magnesium
the less likelihood of developing this disease.

Dr. Lawrence Resnick, professor of medicine and director of
hypertension, Wayne State University, studied the blood pressure of
patients who were both diabetic and non-diabetic. He found that all
patients with hypertension, whether diabetic or non-diabetic, had lower
magnesium levels than people with normal blood pressure.

Resnick says he has treated patients who were hypertensive in spite of
taking one or two medications to treat this disease. And that by adding
magnesium their pressure returned to normal.

So are you getting 350 milligrams (mg) of magnesium a day? A good start
would be one baked potato with skin (55 mg), half an ounce of almonds
(43 mg), one shredded wheat (40 mg), one cup of plain low fat yogurt
(43 mg), one-half cup of brown rice (42 mg), one banana (32 mg), a
three-ounce grilled salmon (28 mg), one slice of whole wheat bread (24
mg) and add more fruits and vegetables.

As well, don't forget to drink milk. Drinking two glasses of milk a day
also provides 20 per cent of the daily requirements of magnesium. Once
again we find that milk isn't just for kids.

I agree with the article on every point except the recommendation to
drink milk, unless it's raw and unpasteurized. The dairy association
in the US managed to destroy that market for most states years ago.
Dairy has been implicated in elevated risk for several diseases,
including CVD. Cultured dairy products are fine.
Back to top
Fuck Google
medicine forum addict


Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 94

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 2:21 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

vernon <there@there> wrote in message
news:445622cb$0$3077$9a6e19ea@unlimited.newshosting.com...
Quote:

"PeterB" <pkm@mytrashmail.com> wrote in message
news:1146491469.671264.223670@j73g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
Dr. W. Gifford-Jones, "Magnesium fights raFrom Stuart Hyderman who also
claims to be a chiropractor wrote in message:

Stuart hydernan hyderman stuart
nge of serious ills", Star
Quote:
Phoenix, April 29, 2006,
Link:

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/weekend_extra/story.html?id=

7e9bedf0-2513-4413-b34a-0881216c0cb6
Quote:

A healthy 18-year-old basketball player and health-conscious jogger
recently left this world all of a sudden. Why?

An initial diagnosis was death from coronary artery disease due to high
blood cholesterol. However, the cause of death eventually proved to be
magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium has never been a super-star nutrient like calcium. But it's
still crucial in keeping the undertaker away and in fighting several
common chronic diseases.

So are you getting enough of this mineral?

Magnesium is nature's natural antispasmodic and it's amazing this fact
hasn't triggered more attention from the medical community.

In 1979. Dr. J.R. Chipperfield reported in the British Journal Lancet
that patients who suffered from angina often had low levels of blood
magnesium and that this nutrient could ease spasm and pain.

More important, magnesium can prevent sudden death.

Regular beating of the heart is controlled by an extremely complex
electrical mechanism. Low magnesium levels toss a monkey-wrench into
this process, causing an abnormal rhythm called ventricular
fibrillation. Death often results.

Magnesium also adds oil to the blood, helping to prevent sudden death
in another way. Adequate amounts of magnesium decrease the risk that
blood platelets will stick together forming a fatal blood clot. This is
important for those with risk factors for heart attack such as obesity,
diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. The lack of magnesium helps
to explain why 50 per cent of people who die of a heart attack have
normal blood cholesterol.

Now researchers have discovered that magnesium assists in the fight
against one of this nation's biggest killers, diabetes. Today 95 per
cent of diabetes is due to obesity. The exhausted pancreas fails to
produce sufficient amounts of insulin to control the amount of sugar
(glucose) in the blood. To make matters worse for obese patients,
"insulin resistance" develops. Then insulin becomes less effective in
clearing the blood of glucose.

Dr. Jerry Nadler, chief of endocrinology and metabolism at the
University of Virginia, reports that a low dietary intake of magnesium
can also encourage insulin resistance.

In his study, Nadler placed patients on a magnesium-deficient diet for
a mere three weeks. This showed that their cells not only became
deficient in magnesium, but also that insulin became less capable of
transporting glucose from the blood into cells.

Nadler's message was quite clear: "You can cause insulin resistance in
people who do not have diabetes. Just deprive them of magnesium."

Another huge study has demonstrated the importance of magnesium. Since
1976, Harvard University has followed the health of 85,000 nurses and
since 1986, another 43,000 men. Both studies concluded that that there
was a significant relationship between magnesium intake and the risk of
developing diabetes.

In the Nurses Health Study, for instance, researchers found that women
consuming 220 milligrams (mg) of magnesium were one-third more likely
to develop diabetes during the next six years than those consuming 340
mg of magnesium daily. The message? The greater the intake of magnesium
the less likelihood of developing this disease.

Dr. Lawrence Resnick, professor of medicine and director of
hypertension, Wayne State University, studied the blood pressure of
patients who were both diabetic and non-diabetic. He found that all
patients with hypertension, whether diabetic or non-diabetic, had lower
magnesium levels than people with normal blood pressure.

Resnick says he has treated patients who were hypertensive in spite of
taking one or two medications to treat this disease. And that by adding
magnesium their pressure returned to normal.

So are you getting 350 milligrams (mg) of magnesium a day? A good start
would be one baked potato with skin (55 mg), half an ounce of almonds
(43 mg), one shredded wheat (40 mg), one cup of plain low fat yogurt
(43 mg), one-half cup of brown rice (42 mg), one banana (32 mg), a
three-ounce grilled salmon (28 mg), one slice of whole wheat bread (24
mg) and add more fruits and vegetables.

As well, don't forget to drink milk. Drinking two glasses of milk a day
also provides 20 per cent of the daily requirements of magnesium. Once
again we find that milk isn't just for kids.

I agree with the article on every point except the recommendation to
drink milk, unless it's raw and unpasteurized. The dairy association
in the US managed to destroy that market for most states years ago.
Dairy has been implicated in elevated risk for several diseases,
including CVD. Cultured dairy products are fine.


Yes, milk IS "just for kids"
Also forget the nonsense about "low fat" yogurt. It's either yogurt or no
yogurt.

Back to top
Fuck Google
medicine forum addict


Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 94

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 2:19 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

From Stuart Hyderman who also claims to be a chiropractor wrote in message:
Stuart hydernan hyderman stuart

PeterB <pkm@mytrashmail.com> wrote in message
news:1146501458.934021.29120@v46g2000cwv.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

vernon wrote:
"PeterB" <pkm@mytrashmail.com> wrote in message
news:1146491469.671264.223670@j73g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
Dr. W. Gifford-Jones, "Magnesium fights range of serious ills", Star
Phoenix, April 29, 2006,
Link:

http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarphoenix/news/weekend_extra/story.html?id=

7e9bedf0-2513-4413-b34a-0881216c0cb6
Quote:

A healthy 18-year-old basketball player and health-conscious jogger
recently left this world all of a sudden. Why?

An initial diagnosis was death from coronary artery disease due to
high
blood cholesterol. However, the cause of death eventually proved to
be
magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium has never been a super-star nutrient like calcium. But it's
still crucial in keeping the undertaker away and in fighting several
common chronic diseases.

So are you getting enough of this mineral?

Magnesium is nature's natural antispasmodic and it's amazing this
fact
hasn't triggered more attention from the medical community.

In 1979. Dr. J.R. Chipperfield reported in the British Journal Lancet
that patients who suffered from angina often had low levels of blood
magnesium and that this nutrient could ease spasm and pain.

More important, magnesium can prevent sudden death.

Regular beating of the heart is controlled by an extremely complex
electrical mechanism. Low magnesium levels toss a monkey-wrench into
this process, causing an abnormal rhythm called ventricular
fibrillation. Death often results.

Magnesium also adds oil to the blood, helping to prevent sudden death
in another way. Adequate amounts of magnesium decrease the risk that
blood platelets will stick together forming a fatal blood clot. This
is
important for those with risk factors for heart attack such as
obesity,
diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. The lack of magnesium
helps
to explain why 50 per cent of people who die of a heart attack have
normal blood cholesterol.

Now researchers have discovered that magnesium assists in the fight
against one of this nation's biggest killers, diabetes. Today 95 per
cent of diabetes is due to obesity. The exhausted pancreas fails to
produce sufficient amounts of insulin to control the amount of sugar
(glucose) in the blood. To make matters worse for obese patients,
"insulin resistance" develops. Then insulin becomes less effective in
clearing the blood of glucose.

Dr. Jerry Nadler, chief of endocrinology and metabolism at the
University of Virginia, reports that a low dietary intake of
magnesium
can also encourage insulin resistance.

In his study, Nadler placed patients on a magnesium-deficient diet
for
a mere three weeks. This showed that their cells not only became
deficient in magnesium, but also that insulin became less capable of
transporting glucose from the blood into cells.

Nadler's message was quite clear: "You can cause insulin resistance
in
people who do not have diabetes. Just deprive them of magnesium."

Another huge study has demonstrated the importance of magnesium.
Since
1976, Harvard University has followed the health of 85,000 nurses and
since 1986, another 43,000 men. Both studies concluded that that
there
was a significant relationship between magnesium intake and the risk
of
developing diabetes.

In the Nurses Health Study, for instance, researchers found that
women
consuming 220 milligrams (mg) of magnesium were one-third more likely
to develop diabetes during the next six years than those consuming
340
mg of magnesium daily. The message? The greater the intake of
magnesium
the less likelihood of developing this disease.

Dr. Lawrence Resnick, professor of medicine and director of
hypertension, Wayne State University, studied the blood pressure of
patients who were both diabetic and non-diabetic. He found that all
patients with hypertension, whether diabetic or non-diabetic, had
lower
magnesium levels than people with normal blood pressure.

Resnick says he has treated patients who were hypertensive in spite
of
taking one or two medications to treat this disease. And that by
adding
magnesium their pressure returned to normal.

So are you getting 350 milligrams (mg) of magnesium a day? A good
start
would be one baked potato with skin (55 mg), half an ounce of almonds
(43 mg), one shredded wheat (40 mg), one cup of plain low fat yogurt
(43 mg), one-half cup of brown rice (42 mg), one banana (32 mg), a
three-ounce grilled salmon (28 mg), one slice of whole wheat bread
(24
mg) and add more fruits and vegetables.

As well, don't forget to drink milk. Drinking two glasses of milk a
day
also provides 20 per cent of the daily requirements of magnesium.
Once
again we find that milk isn't just for kids.

I agree with the article on every point except the recommendation to
drink milk, unless it's raw and unpasteurized. The dairy association
in the US managed to destroy that market for most states years ago.
Dairy has been implicated in elevated risk for several diseases,
including CVD. Cultured dairy products are fine.


Yes, milk IS "just for kids"
Also forget the nonsense about "low fat" yogurt. It's either yogurt or
no
yogurt.

I agree. Low fat was a solution to a problem that never existed
(unless puking has an RDA)
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Fuck Google
medicine forum addict


Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 94

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 2:18 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

From Stuart Hyderman who also claims to be a chiropractor wrote in message:
Stuart hydernan hyderman stuart

<st_brigids_gate_farm@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1146508014.855665.35300@u72g2000cwu.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

PeterB wrote:
snipped

I agree. Low fat was a solution to a problem that never existed
(unless puking has an RDA)


I thought low fat was the solution to the problem created by
homogenizing milk.

I'll stick with raw, unpasteurized milk, and with the kefir, yogurt,
and cheeses made from it.

Kitten, who needs to get a couple of goats trained to be milked and is
contemplating trading one of last spring's heifers for an unrelated
milker
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Fuck Google
medicine forum addict


Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 94

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 2:02 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

From Stuart Hyderman who also claims to be a chiropractor wrote in message:
PeterB <pkm@mytrashmail.com> wrote in message
news:1146576962.749836.117240@j73g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:

st_brigids_gate_farm@yahoo.com wrote:
PeterB wrote:
snipped

I agree. Low fat was a solution to a problem that never existed
(unless puking has an RDA)


I thought low fat was the solution to the problem created by
homogenizing milk.

First, we have no genes expressed for metabolization of extraspecies
dairy because 99% of our ancestors had no exposure to it. Second,
lactose intolerance (or even higher cholesterol resulting from whole
fat milk) may be just the most obvious indicators that dairy is
problematic. Long-term disease response usually develops without
warning. Some research shows that even those with high-range normal
glucose response are at greater risk of heart disease, without being
classified as diabetic. Man is the only animal that consumes milk
after being weaned from the mother.

I'll stick with raw, unpasteurized milk, and with the kefir, yogurt,
and cheeses made from it.

Kitten, who needs to get a couple of goats trained to be milked and is
contemplating trading one of last spring's heifers for an unrelated
milker
Back to top
PeterB
medicine forum Guru


Joined: 28 Apr 2005
Posts: 384

PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2006 1:36 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

st_brigids_gate_farm@yahoo.com wrote:
Quote:
PeterB wrote:
snipped

I agree. Low fat was a solution to a problem that never existed
(unless puking has an RDA)


I thought low fat was the solution to the problem created by
homogenizing milk.

First, we have no genes expressed for metabolization of extraspecies
dairy because 99% of our ancestors had no exposure to it. Second,
lactose intolerance (or even higher cholesterol resulting from whole
fat milk) may be just the most obvious indicators that dairy is
problematic. Long-term disease response usually develops without
warning. Some research shows that even those with high-range normal
glucose response are at greater risk of heart disease, without being
classified as diabetic. Man is the only animal that consumes milk
after being weaned from the mother.

Quote:
I'll stick with raw, unpasteurized milk, and with the kefir, yogurt,
and cheeses made from it.

Kitten, who needs to get a couple of goats trained to be milked and is
contemplating trading one of last spring's heifers for an unrelated
milker
Back to top
st_brigids_gate_farm@yaho
medicine forum beginner


Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2006 6:26 pm    Post subject: Re: Magnesium fights range of serious ills Reply with quote

PeterB wrote:
<snipped>
Quote:

I agree. Low fat was a solution to a problem that never existed
(unless puking has an RDA)


I thought low fat was the solution to the problem created by
homogenizing milk.

I'll stick with raw, unpasteurized milk, and with the kefir, yogurt,
and cheeses made from it.

Kitten, who needs to get a couple of goats trained to be milked and is
contemplating trading one of last spring's heifers for an unrelated
milker
Back to top
Google

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